Looking for previews and reviews of SXSW 2019? Right this way.

SXSW 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | Live at Leeds 2016 | 2015 | 2014
Sound City 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | Great Escape 2018 | 2015 | 2013 | 2012

Don't forget to like There Goes the Fear on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

Video of the Moment #2807: We Are Scientists

 
By on Tuesday, 20th March 2018 at 6:00 pm
 

Long-soldiering American indie rock duo We Are Scientists will have a new album for us next month. ‘Megaplex’, the American duo’s sixth studio album, will be out on the 27th of April on 100% Records. The first single ‘One In, One Out’ appeared last month; you can read my review of it through here. This week, they have a new one called ‘Your Light Has Changed’. Those have seen the pair play live may recognise it, as it was the first tune from the upcoming LP that We Are Scientists added to their set list. This hard-rocking number full of pounding drum beats and squealing guitar will soon become one of your favourites. Stay tuned for ‘Megaplex’ coming soon in just a few weeks! For much more on We Are Scientists here on TGTF – we’ve covered them quite a bit – follow this link.

 

Single Review: We Are Scientists – One In, One Out

 
By on Tuesday, 6th February 2018 at 12:00 pm
 

The last time we heard from American pop rockers We Are Scientists, in 2016, they had released their sixth album ‘Helter Seltzer’. You can read our review of that long player through here. It’s 2 years later, and Keith Murray and Chris Cain are hinting about their next record. As usual, the jokesters want to tease us a little with the first single from the upcoming release. An unexpected high-tech sound and an accompanying video is our first glimpse into ‘Megaplex’. The forthcoming album was produced by Max Hart, their partner in crime for 2008’s most excellent ‘Brain Thrust Mastery’, as well as ‘Helter Seltzer’.

Lyrically, ‘One In, One Out’ seems like a run-of-the-mill pop song, treading the all too common ground of angst of falling in love and feeling unsatisfied. Instead of pairing it with a trite melody, We Are Scientists have gone all futuristic, with icy robotic beats and Murray’s voice feeling faintly autotuned. An anthemic, feel good chorus pulls everything together. Instrumentally, the song bops along with a heavy synth line reminiscent of the New Wave-y ‘80s. Cain acknowledges in the press release that the direction of the new material is less philosophical and more hedonistic. “In the past we’ve used our music to educate, to enlighten, to awaken people to the depth and complexity of moral concerns. This time, we really wanted to drop a fun-bomb. Something to dance or f*** to.” Okay, then!

The video for the song looks like something out of the same era: pulsating dots bounce together for each of the band members’ silhouettes, while the band themselves are projected on a black-lit, magenta computerised checkerboard. I’m not going to spoil it for you but where the video ultimately goes is, in typical WAS style, unpredictable and hilarious. One clue: cheese and crackers are great, aren’t you? ‘One In, One Out’ is an intriguing preview of a much-awaited return from a pair of experienced singer/songwriters whose pop gems have rarely disappointed us.

8/10

‘One In, One Out’, We Are Scientists’ newest single, is out now. ‘Megaplex’, the American duo’s sixth studio album, will be out on the 27th of April on 100% Records. To read more on We Are Scientists here on TGTF, go here.

 

LeeFest Presents: The Neverland 2016 Roundup

 
By on Friday, 5th August 2016 at 2:00 pm
 

When you think of Neverland, you consider the following synonymous: timelessness, youthful vigour and a certain transcendence. In the middle of a forest in Kent, near Edenbridge, Neverland became a reality through the help of Lee and his homegrown festival Leefest 2016. Though the weather was not quite ideal upon first landing, it was far from an issue. The moment you wandered into the main arena, it was clear the only thing that would stop a good time being had would be those adult thoughts that should’ve been, at this point, relegated to the outside world. Neverland’s sole purpose over these 3 days was to be a vehicle for your removal from society and instead to provide you a good time.

Split into three main sections, The Neverwoods (main arena), Mermaids Lagoon (rave central) and Skull Ridge (rock city), you were never far from some form of entertainment. The introductory day, Thursday, saw the smallest of the lineup but definitely the strongest. With only Tootles Circus, your average festival tent, operating as a stage, all four acts were nice and accessible. Peluche and Loyle Carner eased the gaining crowd in, but it was the main attractions of Everything Everything and Ghostpoet (pictured at top) who garnered in the big numbers. With Everything Everything, they perfectly stoked the crowd’s fire and brought their unique blend of rapturous choruses and genre bending music. Conversely, Ghostpoet gave the tent a dark atmosphere with his blend of hip-hop-cum-rock-assault.

Friday brought forth the first full day affair, with Peluche once again kicking proceedings off, but this time on the main stage, aka the ‘Bangerang’ stage. The overall setup of the main arena was easily navigated but with the two stages being centrally located, sound spill was inevitable. Fortunately this didn’t happen frequently, though it’s a dangerous game to play. Highlights from the second day included Corey Fox-Fardell and his brand of songwriter electro melding, which was a particularly pleasant listen whilst grazing in front of the Bangerang stage. Little Simz proved why she is one to watch in the UK hip-hop game, leading the enthusiastic crowd through numerous chants as she dominated the beats surrounding her. In a similar fashion, Roots Manuva brought domineering and commanding beats that just reinforced the entire notion behind LeeFest: you can be who you want, and listen to what you want, as long as you have a good time. Rockers, hip-hoppers and the like were all moving and shaking to the sounds that flowed from the Bangerang stage.

Current London-based pop troubadour Oscar provided his blend of melodic darling instrumentation and baritone vocals. One thing’s for sure, you can’t not have a good time at an Oscar show, no matter the crowd size or venue. Dinosaur Pile-Up sat on top of the kingdom of chaos and noise after a headlining set at the Hook Rock stage in the Skull Ridge. It’s was a venue reminiscent of small clubs, where the noise cascades from all orifices and you’re able to lose yourself in the darkness amongst your other perspiring peers. Barrelling through their grunge/punk hybrid hits, the volume was overbearing at the front. We recommend you watch from a safe distance if you’re stupid enough to forget ear protection (a particular note to self).

The final day started off in stereotypical British style, with grey clouds and intermittent rain, but this didn’t affect the atmosphere. Hannah Lou Clark was a particular highlight: sans band, she used both her pure talents and an iPod to create a wonderfully relaxed and charming environment. Everybody’s favourite indie twosome We Are Scientists provided a particularly raucous set that included singer Keith Murray venturing deep into the crowd during ‘Textbook’, where he proceeded to enlist the help of a particularly fluorescent orange Poseidon who was amongst the crowd. Following these shenanigans was current electro-indie darling Shura, having released her debut album ‘Nothing’s Real’ in July. Delivering a captivating set that never failed to both strike you emotively and melodically, the biggest draw of Shura live is the fact she is clearly there because of the sheer love and devotion for her art. She knows what she likes to dance to and fortunately, we do too.

Originally announced to take place on the Thursday, after a mishap with the programs and the cat being let out of the bag early, the not-so-secret secret set from Frank Carter & The Rattlesnakes Saturday evening was the perfect climax to this weekend of escapism and release. The pure fury that comes with any Frank Carter show is cathartic enough to make sure you leave with a weightlessness, one that can only be achieved by taking part in both a circle pit and storming the stage, two things this fortunate writer was seen doing.

After all is said and done, the aforementioned sole purpose of LeeFest was achieved. With pirates and lost boys running around shooting each other with water pistols and climbing aboard the decorative dens around the stages, it was impossible to not get lost in the affair. A festival that catered to both families and those of all ages looking to simply cut loose, the promise this event holds is even grander than its current fasthon. Considering this was Leefest’s largest year yet, the sky’s the limit. And with the lead lost boy at the helm, LeeFest could very well be a major player for years to come.

 

We Are Scientists / October and November 2016 UK/Irish Tour

 
By on Friday, 22nd July 2016 at 9:00 am
 

Perennial American jokesters – and awesome music duo to boot – We Are Scientists have announced details of a massive UK and Irish tour for this autumn. They’ll be touring in support of their sixth album ‘Helter Seltzer’, which was released back in the spring. You can read Steven’s review of the long player through this link. You can also have a read of bassist Chris Cain’s chat with him this month here, ahead of their appearances this weekend at Kendal Calling 2016 and next weekend’s Leefest Presents: The Neverland 2016.

Tickets to this autumn’s tour are on sale now. To watch their latest video for ‘In My Head’, featured on ‘Helter Skelter’, check it out below the long tour date list. We love those guys, so to read any or all of our extensive back catalogue of articles on We Are Scientists, head this way.

Friday 7th October 2016 – Bognor Regis Butlins (Rockaway Beach)
Saturday 8th October 2016 – Cardiff Clwb Ifor Bach
Sunday 9th October 2016 – Portsmouth Wedgewood Rooms
Monday 10th October 2016 – Oxford Academy 2
Tuesday 11th October 2016 – Gloucester Guildhall
Thursday 13th October 2016 – Falmouth Pavillion
Friday 14th October 2016 – Plymouth Hub
Saturday 15th October 2016 – London Oval Space (Hackney Wonderland)
Sunday 16th October 2016 – Guildford Boileroom
Tuesday 18th October 2016 – Wolverhampton Slade Rooms
Wednesday 19th October 2016 – Liverpool Arts Club
Thursday 20th October 2016 – Dublin Opium
Friday 21st October 2016 – Galway Roisin Dubh
Sunday 23rd October 2016 – Belfast Limelight
Monday 24th October 2016 – Edinburgh Liquid Rooms
Tuesday 25th October 2016 – Aberdeen Garage
Wednesday 26th October 2016 – Dundee Buskers
Thursday 27th October 2016 – York Fibbers
Saturday 29th October 2016 – Holmfirth Picturedrome
Monday 31st October 2016 – Norwich Waterfront
Tuesday 1st November 2016 – Cambridge Junction
Wednesday 2nd November 2016 – Southend Chinnerys
Thursday 3rd November 2016 – Bedford Esquires
Friday 4th November 2016 – Barrow In Furness Barrow Library (Get Loud in Libraries)

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VOWiQNpy6hg[/youtube]

 

Interview: Chris Cain of We Are Scientists

 
By on Thursday, 21st July 2016 at 11:00 am
 

The ever hard-working duo of Chris Cain and Keith Murray, better known as We Are Scientists, are back at it again. Having just released their fifth studio album ‘Helter Seltzer’ in April, they’re hitting the road. Hard. With dates completed in the UK and American already, they’re embarking once again to the fair British shores for a few small festival dates before a much larger and focused album tour in October. One of the festival dates coming up is at LeeFest, based in Kent (the one from the advert on TV for UK readers), one of a small explosion of smaller festivals appearing over recent years. We managed to get a phone call with Chris (pictured left at top) during this hectic season, where he spoke to us about the difference between playing to smaller festivals than larger ones. Also discussed was the new, slick We Are Scientists look and the new album artwork that is, shall we say, for your own interpretation.

Chris Cain has one of those voice that kind of lends itself to being father-like but also an air of humour, which is just one of the reasons why a We Are Scientists show is one of the best investments you could make. As previously mentioned, they are returning to the UK for a run of those quaint, smaller festivals before embarking on a larger tour later in the year. On the subject of the differences between those behemoth festivals that shadow the festival season, compared to those smaller, metropolitan festivals that are sprouting up everywhere, Cain muses, “A smaller festival shares some characteristics with a club show, where you know you feel more of a connection with the audience. And ultimately, that’s our preferred type of show, where it’s a few hundred to maximum a couple of thousand.” Elaborating further, he offers, “once you get into [playing to] 20,000 people, which we’ve played a handful of times, it’s cool, it has its own thrill to have that many people doing anything in sync with each other, with the energy there, that’s the only good thing about larger festivals.”

We all know that atmosphere at festivals is the most important part. It’s why we attend them as music fans. There’s a certain feeling that can only be found when surrounded by several thousand of your fellow music fans, rather than a concentration of specific band fans. Cain says, “It’s that specific moment and that vibe. There’s so many other things that you lose when you play to that many people. And I also think as an audience member, there’s so much that kind of disappears, although that crazy energy of being in sync with many thousands of your fellow man is pretty cool. Luckily we have both in the world.”

The rise of smaller, city-based festivals has definitely increased the ability for bands to both tour while gaining new fans, as well as bringing an atmosphere otherwise reserved for large fields to towns that would normally go amiss. These smaller festivals are certainly more suited to We Are Scientists, as Cain mentioned. “City festivals are cool because you’re still playing in a club, but you have this sort communal spirit of a festival where a bunch of people are out for a couple of days to listen to music and that’s kind of the focus of everyone’s lives which gives a kind of a festive atmosphere than a single club show can provide.”

big We Are Scientists Helter Seltzer cover

‘Helter Seltzer’, the reason behind all these shows, features artwork that is particularly, we’ll go for inexplainable, even by Cain himself. “I’m not sure I can completely claim to understand the artwork, it was a very much a collaboration with our artist who is a weird New Zealand recluse who I’ve never met face to face. He did our last record as well, he makes all of our merch designs and he re-did our Web site for this record. Very talented, a drawer as well as a builder of Web sites, but also very crazy, strange fella with highly peculiar tastes. So this album artwork was very much his reaction to the music.” The best advice we can give is to listen to the new record whilst staring intensely at the artwork. Without blinking. If you manage to make any sense of it, leave a comment here or send us a postcard.

Moving onto their current live show. If you haven’t seen We Are Scientists before, then you are greatly missing out. And this time around you’ll notice they’ve suited up, making the well-oiled machine that is We Are Scientists an even smoother watch. “It was kind of an arbitrary decision, we had a friend take some photos of us, because we needed press photos around the time we were announcing the new album and we decided to wear those outfits, just all black.” For some reason this look seriously suits the duo, ridiculously so. Cain continues, “then we really liked how the photos turned out and thought, ‘are we really going to pack five black outfits?’ So we decided we would. It kind of hasn’t been as much of a laundry nightmare as I thought it would.”

There is literally no reason to not catch We Are Scientists on tour this year and if they aren’t coming to your town, get some friends and travel. They’re worth it. Catch them at Kendal Calling this weekend in the North, followed by their appearance back in the South East in Kent for LeeFest Presents: The Neverland 2016.

 

Live at Leeds 2016 Roundup (Part 2)

 
By on Thursday, 12th May 2016 at 1:00 pm
 

If you missed the first installment of Rebecca’s roundup of Live at Leeds 2016, you can catch up on it right back here.

Following Mystery Jets at the Academy, I arrived early for Clean Cut Kid’s set at Leeds University Union and caught their soundcheck, which consisted of a stripped back version of ‘Vitamin C’, showcasing Evelyn and Mike Halls’ impeccable vocals. The crowd had already built up before the end of the soundcheck, and I’d bumped into a couple of people on my way in who were looking for the stage and excited to catch the band in action. The set was bookended with the band’s two most popular tracks, opening with ‘Runaway’ and closing with ‘Vitamin C’. From start to finish, it was an indie-pop filled half hour of fun, bright guitar hooks and vibrant vocals, and there was an abundance of dancing, clapping and singing along from the crowd.

[youtube]https://youtu.be/aDnC5oUVht0[/youtube]

I caught Catholic Action at Nation of Shopkeepers, the kooky bunting-trimmed venue in the city’s centre. Catholic Action are one of those bands who sound good on record, and even better live. Their upbeat, pop/indie blend was well suited to Nation of Shopkeepers, which was probably my favourite venue of all that I was able to visit on the day. A friend of mine recently described the band as a “Scottish Weezer”, and after hearing them perform, I can’t say that I disagree. Their set was a standout for me on the day, from the jingling guitars to the clap-inspiring drumbeats and crisp vocals.

[youtube]https://youtu.be/BAl47wdxgS4[/youtube]

Back over at the Brudenell Social Club I arrived partway through Vitamin‘s set. The dreamy indie pop quartet are Leeds locals and were in full-flow by the time I arrived, having drawn in a medium-sized but enthusiastic crowd. Lead singer Jared Laville was decked out in a double denim stonewashed ensemble and was charismatically wooing the crowd. During the final song of the set, the band’s latest single ‘Waterfall’, Laville descended into the crowd, with people reaching out to touch him like he was the messiah of dream pop.

[youtube]https://youtu.be/D7rGP9aoGSY[/youtube]

After Vitamin was Anteros on the Games Room stage across the hall at Brudenell. As with The Velveteens earlier in the day, it took a while for the crowd to build and required prompting from lead singer Laura Hayden to bring the crowd forward. Hayden was vibrant and commanded attention, standing before the crowd with just a microphone in her hand, occasionally bashing a drum. The whole band looked like they were having a great time. Stand out tracks were ‘Breakfast’, the band’s latest single, and their previous singles ‘Fade to Grey’ and self-titled ‘Anteros’, which is such an excellent track and sounds even better live, showing off Hayden’s brilliant voice. The band has created an iridescent variety of wistful indie-pop that’s just edgy enough to avoid being too sweet. Their performance was another standout for me, but I can’t help thinking that they might have benefitted from a stage closer to the city centre that would have drawn in a larger crowd.

[youtube]https://youtu.be/MdENOdnxPkc[/youtube]

The first and only other time I’ve seen We Are Scientists live was in 2010 on the NME stage at Leeds Festival, so I was determined to make it back to Leeds University Union to catch them before I had to leave. I made it to the Union in order to get a decent spot on the stairs, which in hindsight wasn’t the best idea as I was constantly bumped into by people trying to make their way up and down the staircase, struggling against the tide of people that had also decided on the same viewing spot as myself. But the struggle was worth it. From the minute Keith Murray and Chris Cain walked on stage they built up a cheeky back and forth between each other and the audience, with Cain immediately going over to the audience at this side of the stage and shaking hands with members of the audience.

We Are Scientists opened with ‘The Scene is Dead’, before following up with other hits such as ‘Nobody Move, Nobody Get Hurt’ and ‘I Don’t Bite’, and ‘Buckle’, the first single from their latest album ‘Helter Seltzer’, released in April. I had to leave shortly after, but I was happy to have experienced the 20 minutes or so in the band’s presence, which was the cherry on top of an already great day.

[youtube]https://youtu.be/Et9llKBJdEs[/youtube]

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

RSS Feed   RSS Feed  

Learn More About Us