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Live Gig Video: Waylayers perform new song ‘Rose Tinted’ at London Roundhouse

 
By on Tuesday, 5th August 2014 at 4:00 pm
 

Back in the spring, East London’s Waylayers shot this video of ‘Rose Tinted’ from a live performance they did at London Roundhouse. The video features on the CD release on the 15th of September on Alcopop! Records of a new double A-sided single, ‘Take Hold’ / ‘Footsie’. Watch the live performance below; the song itself has a bit of a bouncy reggae-ish / pop flavour. If you like this one, hang tight: we’ve been told this is the first of three videos that have been done.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQqDitNr0wM[/youtube]

 

(SXSW 2014 flavoured!) Bands to Watch #299: Waylayers

 
By on Monday, 10th March 2014 at 12:00 pm
 

Waylayers are like a cool ice bath in the searing heat of Austin, Texas. This London based synth-pop four-piece feel incredibly fresh, as they engulf you in their delightfully chipper electronica beats. Dripping with a subtle sense of euphoria their new track ‘Medicine’ has the kind of hook deserving of top chart billing – especially seeing as everyone is getting a bit bored of being told how bloody happy Pharrell is.

We get it, Pharrell – it’s the absolute tits being you – now fuck off, will you?

In a completely positive fashion, frontman Harry Lee’s vocals remind me of Chris Martin of Coldplay*, inoffensive and unobtrusive whilst wholly compelling in the same chords. The chorus of ‘Medicine’ feels extremely ‘80s and works as an atmosphere builder perfectly. The final 20 seconds of the single seems like it’s dragged directly from the end of a Rick Astley song.

Nostalgia aside, you can immediately imagine this pulsing from speakers as you wade through a sea of dry ice. In tandem with their earlier EP, Waylayers are certainly an interesting prospect for your perusal at SXSW. They’re the kind of cute British boys, ala Two Door Cinema Club (also three band members) who you can imagine the American population will adore.

With that in mind, Saturday the 15th of March at 9 in the evening at Icenhauer’s is a showcase sure to have the industry crawling with their grubby mitts all over this three-piece.

*I really like old Coldplay and I REALLY dislike new Coldplay.

 

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2014: Electronic and DJ UK artists showcasing at this year’s SXSW (R-Y)

 
By on Friday, 28th February 2014 at 1:00 pm
 

Please note: all information we bring you about SXSW 2014 is to the best of our knowledge when it posts, and bands scheduled to appear may be subject to change. To learn when your favourite band is playing in Austin, we recommend you first consult the official SXSW schedule, then stop by the band’s Facebook and official Web site for details of any non-official SXSW appearances.

Continuing our coverage of the electronic artists and DJs gracing SXSW 2014‘s fine stages next month, we get down and dirty with the second half of the UK showcasing acts of these genres in this fourth installment of the TGTF Guide to SXSW 2014. In case you missed the first half of the list, you can read all about those previously featured acts here.

Raffertie
In the mood for music with an r&b flavour with soul and a good beat? Benjamin Stefanski has got you covered. Stripped back, he exhibits James Blake-esque composure, but he’s equally at home dropping the eclectic electronic fuzz.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsQlOE4vl5w[/youtube]

Sivu
I wrote: “Let’s face it: there a lot of men out there trying to negotiate the choppy waters of electronic music as solo artists, with varying levels of success. The trick seems to be finding your own special niche in the already overcrowded electro market, something that this act has done well. And seemingly so quickly too.”

Read more of my Bands to Watch on Sivu here.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_964dqQxQwY[/youtube]

Snow Ghosts
London duo Snow Ghosts sound exactly the way their name does: folky vocals overlaid on top of brooding electronica. Intriguing!

Southern Hospitality DJs
DJs Rob Breezy and Superix founded the now infamous Hip Hop Karaoke London, the first of its kind in the UK and an event that has been a road-block every single month at the Social in central London. Recognised for this and many other dance nights their group put on by tonnes of tv and radio stations, newspapers and other media outlets in Britain, they’ve become a DJ force to be reckoned with and won’t be going anywhere anytime soon. Just shut up and dance!

THUMPERS
Ben writes: “Dreamy and ethereal, alt pop duo THUMPERS are seasoned veterans of the UK sound scene from their time as two-thirds of indie rockers Pull Tiger Tail. Drummer Hamson went on to beat skins for the likes of Friendly Fires and Noah & The Whale before reuniting with Marcus Pepperell and a fresh, sunny and delicately layered approach in 2012. Ever productive, there’re plenty of freebies to brush up on via the band’s Soundcloud account, or you could just hold out until SXSW for the full fat experience.”

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FbAKwTS-1LI[/youtube]

To Be Frank
Martin writes: “To Be Frank is the pseudonym of multi-instrumentalist and songwriter Frank Pescod, who, after a period writing contract music for TV and film, and brands as prestigious as Louis Vuitton, found the desire for the limelight was too strong; To Be Frank was created as a platform to spread his music to a wider audience. Things kicked off with single ‘If You Love Her’, a tender piece of whimsical electronica that showcased Pescod’s delicate, soulful voice and neat way with a minimalist arrangement, but didn’t really go much further. Sophomore release ‘Nothing’ introduced glitchy beats and a more insistent groove, playing on urban r‘n’b stylings but still remaining resolutely downtempo… It’s clear that this is a project in its early stages; the benefit of which is that every release tells us something new about the artist concerned. And with such an intriguing combination of chartbait and esoterica at his fingertips, To Be Frank really is one to keep an eye on.”

Read Martin’s full Bands to Watch on To Be Frank here.

Tourist
I wrote: “How to describe the music? While title track ‘Placid Acid’ on his debut EP is exactly as advertised – a gorgeously chill slow build-up of epicness – the otherworldly charms of ‘Jupiter’ and head boppiness of ‘Forgive’ prove he’s not a one-trick pony. The ‘Tonight’ EP sees Will Phillips taking a turn to more upbeat (handclaps!) and sounding more industrial than the debut, though for sure based on these releases alone, the kind of dancing I’m thinking you’re likely to see at Tourist shows is of the languid, fluid, beautiful creature variety. Then again, track ‘Together’ revealed from upcoming EP ‘Patterns’ seems to indicate for his next release, he’s going into higher octane, faster tempo territory. Either way, you’re in for a good show if you see him when he stops in your town. Or, if you’re lucky like us to be going to SXSW, if you have the good fortune to catch him in Texas in March.”

Read the rest of my Bands to Watch on Tourist here.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeAyTPZfsWk[/youtube]

Until the Ribbon Breaks
Cardiff artist Peter Lawrie-Winfield makes music like sombre, claustrophobic Massive Attack: there is something vaguely sinister, vaguely apocalyptic, and yet the beats are stirring and the emphatic lyrics are strangely hypnotic. Already garnering attention from Pitchfork, Lawrie’s sets are likely to be rammed by the young hipster set.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rd_-JY3yq9w[/youtube]

Waylayers
Martin writes: “Theirs is the sound of guitar songwriting meeting Balearic beats and synths as on the anthemic ‘S.O.S.’, which is dancefloor-worthy even without needing a remix. Harry Lee has enormous physical presence, dominating both the stage and the little keyboard from which he generates any number of uplifting synth lines. His vocals are often the spit of Diagrams’ Sam Genders, while the music treads a similar path to other practitioners of the dance crossover genre such as Friendly Fires; the fact that ‘Fires’ was produced by Ewan Pearson of TGTF former faves Delphic is surely no coincidence.”

Young Fathers
“Ol’ Dirty chose his moniker because there was no father to his bastard style. Young Fathers earn theirs by making something so fresh it doesn’t yet have a name. These are three fellas from Edinburgh who’ve been working together since they were 14, who have an elastic mind meld that mimics their fused sensibility of sound, who one day locked themselves in a dingy Scottish basement and came out with something that’d never been done — a fearless combination of beat, rap and song that smells not only of its dark and dank birthplace, but of discovery and of communion.”

Time to take a breather – we’ll back back next week with more of the TGTF Guide to SXSW 2014!

 

Kendal Calling 2013: Day 1 Roundup

 
By on Monday, 19th August 2013 at 2:00 pm
 

If one was to hold a competition to find the most picturesque view in festivaldom, what would be on the shortlist? Certainly the legendary vista of the entire site from Glastonbury’s stone circle. Perhaps the imposing aspect from underneath Primavera’s vast concrete solar monolith across the Mediterranean sea. Equally as impressive, in a considerably more natural way, is the view just past the entrance barriers into Kendal Calling. The grassy site stretches out down a gentle slope, pocked with multicoloured canvas. Billowy cumulonimbus hang in a vast sky graduated between royal and baby blue, whilst on the horizon sit the imposing peaks of the Lake District. Just into the distance, tantalisingly obscured by trees, can be seen the tents and stages of the arena itself.

The geographical fortune of Kendal Calling doesn’t stop there. Being located roughly equidistant between the conurbations of Manchester, Glasgow, and Newcastle upon Tyne contributes to a heady melting pot of accents from three cultures that, let’s be honest, aren’t renowned for being shy of a bit of a party. And Kendal seems to specifically for their requirements: there’s guitar music aplenty, sometimes with a distinctly ‘laddish’ slant, and non-stop dance music until 3 AM for those so inclined towards a bit of an uplifting boogie. Which, as it turned out, for one night only, was me.

Concrete Knives Kendal Calling 2013

The rest of my time at Kendal mostly was spent at the Calling Out stage, a modestly-sized tent featuring less well-known and more up-and-coming acts than the household names hosted on the main stage. The very first act of the festival were Concrete Knives (pictured above), given a cruelly short 30 minutes in which to get across their funky Gallic guitar-pop. They rattle through several from debut ‘Be Your Own King’, Morgane Colas apparently floating in a self-induced trance when singing. They’re a rare treat, funky, cerebral and humorous all at the same time, and I can’t wait to see them do a full headline set (5/5). Champs have a lovely, summery take on the songwriter duo; something like ‘My Spirit Is Broken’ is just the sort of keening, sweetly-harmonied ditty that you want to hear emanating from a warm afternoon tent (3/5).

Waylayers Kendal Calling 2013

Waylayers turn up the tempo somewhat. Theirs is the sound of guitar songwriting meeting Balearic beats and synths as on the anthemic ‘S.O.S.’, which is dancefloor-worthy even without needing a remix. Harry Lee has enormous physical presence, dominating both the stage and the little keyboard from which he generates any number of uplifting synth lines. His vocals are often the spit of Diagrams’ Sam Genders, while the music treads a similar path to other practitioners of the dance crossover genre such as Friendly Fires; the fact that ‘Fires’ was produced by Ewan Pearson of TGTF former faves Delphic is surely no coincidence. Are they still unsigned? Surely not for long (4/5).

Misty Miller Kendal Calling 2013

“I washed my hair for you / I shaved my legs for you too” – the first couplet of ‘Next To You’ neatly summarises Misty Miller’s brand of guitar-based feminism, and the enormous blues riff which explodes seconds later indicates how serious she is about it. This is properly dirty garage rock, as simple as it gets: two, maybe three chords, drums bashed as hard as possible, and as generous a dose of swagger from the eponymous young frontwoman as one could reasonably hope for. Nothing particularly complicated here, but a generous dose of attitude and a nice loud electric guitar go a long way, and considering Misty is still only 19 years old, this is a particularly impressive performance (4/5).

Clean Bandit (pictured at top) are an unusual proposition, with their uneasy blend of dance music overlaid with a variety of classical stringed instruments and some MCing – effectively an updated version of the Dads’ car stereo favourite ‘Hooked On Classics’. A couple of minutes into this year’s ‘Mozart’s House’ single, the beats stop completely and the strings play a few bars solo, before the inevitable four-to-the-floor kick drum reappears, and it all goes hands-in-the-air again. The MC mines the depth of cliché in his classical music references – staccato, pizzicato, they’re all there, sticking out like four crotchets in a bar of waltz. One can’t help but think that fans of neither genre are served well – do dance heads really want strings all over their music? And it’s a rare kind of classical music fan that thinks, “what this string quartet recital really needs is a nice 909 bassline!” Nevertheless, there is some virtue here – the twin female vocalists give good show, the whole thing could act as a decent, risk-free primer to the charms of dance music for débutantes, and overall it’s all pretty good fun – if you don’t mind a bit of cheese in your mid-afternoon sandwich (2/5).

The Heartbreaks Kendal Calling 2013

Whether or not it’s the fact that Morecambe’s The Heartbreaks are treating Kendal Calling as something of a homecoming gig, what with them being just a quick trip up the M6 away from home, there’s something in the demeanour of Matthew Whitehouse and co. that demonstrates that they’re not just making up the numbers here. They would end up playing three times in the same day, including an acoustic set, but the Calling Out stage set was as good as any place to catch them. Clearly steeped in the aesthetic of the swinging ’60s, in many ways The Heartbreaks are keeping alive the straight pop of the pre-grunge ’90s, with a sweet, upbeat songs about girls. There’s a clear Smiths influence, which is no surprise given the band’s enthusiasm for them, but they come across as far more joyous than the Mancunian miserabilists. If you’re in the market for slice after slice of optimistic guitar pop, The Heartbreaks are who you should be listening to (5/5).

A few minutes in the company of Willy Moon soon assuages any doubts that his underwhelming Liverpool Sound City performance was anything other than representative of the usual standard of his work. His set consists of vignettes of self-aggrandising cliché; he himself is an obsequious musical magpie that steals the shiniest but most worthless musical baubles. For example, a compilation of lyrics from recent album ‘Here’s Willy Moon’ tell their own story:

“ain’t coming back no more / yeah yeah / how you like me now / one, two, three, four / I got what you need / got a strange affliction deep in my soul / I wanna be your man / when I was young my mama said / I put a spell on you”

Make no mistake, the first time these musical ideas were invented, they worked, because they were new and exciting. But to simply rehash them and sell them on as one’s own work, isn’t just plagiarism, it’s insulting the intelligence of one’s audience. Moon has an obvious talent for performance, but a desperate hole where there should be some decent, meaty bits of song – pretty much all of which are under 3 minutes long, and some are under 2. Usually brevity in music is to be applauded, as long as what is presented is an original idea, concisely expressed. In Moon’s case, his are underdeveloped foeti of songs, birthed at too young an age, dressed up in the glitter of production to disguise their weakness (1/5).

Public Enemy Kendal Calling 2013

Public Enemy, on the other hand, have a lot to say, perhaps quite a lot more than can be easily understood on first listen by a white Yorkshireman. The show is highly theatrical, with Flava Flav making an appearance ages after things have got going; in fact it was three songs in, because the photographers were preparing to leave after the customary three songs, only to be called back by Flav because he hadn’t had enough of the limelight – the first time in my experience that an artist has called for more photographic exposure rather than less. And certainly the first time that terms have been overruled directly from onstage. Flav makes an impassioned tribute to the unfortunate black American teenager Trayvon Martin, to whom he dedicates his continuing to wear the clock around his neck. There’s entourage scattered around the stage, seemingly just standing there most of the time, but overall it’s a pretty highly-charged affair, set amongst what it could be said is a fairly inoffensive, apolitical bill. And there’s nowt wrong with that (4/5).

 

Bands to Watch #220: Waylayers

 
By on Tuesday, 21st June 2011 at 12:00 pm
 

It’s safe to say that the world of atmospheric pop is still expanding. Artists such as Clock Opera and Gallops (featured on Kitsune’s recent release ‘Kitsune Maison 11: The Indie-Dance Issue’) have carved out a niche that many people in the UK want to be a part of. One of the newest bands on the scene are East London trio Waylayers. Since their formation last year, the band have begun to find success at a phenomenal rate. Their personal style of indie-pop electronica has already proved a hit with music buffs across the board, most noticeably 6Music’s Steve Lamacq who recently named them as an ‘Unsigned Band of the Week’. The London three-piece are now readying themselves for the release of their debut single, ‘Hear No Lies’ on the 1st of August (video below).

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2R36s_wFRSs[/youtube]

‘Hear No Lies’ was produced by Ewan Pearson (who notably has worked with the likes of TGTF favourite Delphic and Tracey Thorn), and his influence is noticeable. The catchy synthline stands out in what is a prime example of new atmospheric pop. Having only been a band for a short period of time, they’re still brimming with new ideas and styles. The haunting vocals and ambient melody create a chilling but conversely relaxing soundscape, which still keeps its indie-pop undertones.

Waylayers are due to release ‘Hear No Lies’ on 1st of August. They’re also playing the following dates over summer:

Tuesday 12th July 2011 – London Macbeth
Sunday 17th July 2011 – London Queen Of Hoxton
Friday 5th August 2011 – London Old Blue Last

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

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