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MP3 of the Day #828: Wonder Villains

 
By on Thursday, 8th May 2014 at 10:00 am
 

Spunky Northern Irish quartet the the Wonder Villains are offering a free download of ‘Space Jam’ on their Bandcamp page, in return for adding your e-mail address to their mailing list. ‘Space Jam’ is an old favorite tune for the band, but this download is a new version, recorded during the tracking of their new LP ‘Rocky’, which is due out in June. (In case you’re wondering, yes, it’s about the 1996 movie of the same name.)

 

SXSW 2014: Full Irish Breakfast at B.D. Riley’s – 14th March 2014

 
By on Monday, 31st March 2014 at 1:00 pm
 

One of the events I was most looking forward to at SXSW 2014 was the Full Irish Breakfast at B.D. Riley’s hosted by Music From Ireland. I must admit upfront that the actual meal is not my particular cup of tea (and in the interest of full confession, I drank coffee) but it was a nice part of the general atmosphere of the event. Our editor Mary joined me for part of the day’s festivities and has already touched on the Irish Breakfast in her Friday coverage.


When we walked in to B.D. Riley’s, we were warmly greeted by Mary’s friend and event organizer, Music from Ireland’s Angela Dorgan, as well as a host of other now familiar faces including several acquaintances made at the British Music Embassy over the course of the week. We were sat at a table in the front of the room near the sound desk, which gave us easy access to photos and quick chats with the artists on the schedule, and I quickly made the decision to set up camp there for the entire day. I was over the moon, as the lineup for the day included several acts I’d been dying to see.

Music From Ireland playbill SXSW 2014

We had missed UNKNWN earlier in the week at the Creative Belfast showcase, but we didn’t have to wait long to have our curiosity satisfied at B.D. Riley’s. The Northern Irish electro duo of music producer Chris Hanna (identified singularly as Unknown) and vocalist Gemma Dunleavy provided us with our morning slow jam, even as the clock crept into afternoon territory. Hanna’s deep and dreamy bass groove combined with Dunleavy’s smooth, clear vocals created a very chill, relaxed sonic atmosphere to start off the day.

UNKNWN at BD Riley's 14 March 2014

The next band, Dublin sister act Heathers, couldn’t have been more of a stylistic contrast to UNKNWN. I had gotten a sneak peek at them at the Music From Ireland showcase on the Wednesday night, so I knew to expect a change of pace. Of course, it helped that before they went on stage, Ellie Macnamara was kind enough to grant me a cheeky photo of her set list.

Heathers set list BD Riley's 14 March 2014

Heathers’ edgy, energetic rock, interlaced with tightly woven vocal harmonies and countermelodies, was the perfect antidote to the hearty Irish breakfast we’d just consumed. After their set, I was able to set up a quick interview with the sisters Macnamara for a bit later in the day.

Heathers at BD Riley's 14 March 2014

I was especially excited to see Rams’ Pocket Radio again, after having heard his set at Creative Belfast on the Monday night. As he mentioned in my interview with him from that night, he came to SXSW with a full band of musicians, who were tightly packed onto the small stage at B.D. Riley’s. Once again, they played a set featuring several tracks from Rams’ Pocket Radio’s album, ‘Béton’, including ‘Dogs Run in Packs’, ‘1+2’, ‘Dieter Rams Has Got the Pocket Radios’, and current single ‘Love is a Bitter Thing’. (My recent review of ‘Love is a Bitter Thing’ can be found here.)

Rams' Pocket Radio at BD Riley's 14 March 2014

As I’ve previously mentioned, I found Rams’ Pocket Radio a bit difficult to photograph due to his emphatic performance style. I was able to catch a few decent photos at the Irish Breakfast, but unfortunately it distracted me a bit from listening to the music. I made a mental note to try to return for his late show that night, also at B.D. Riley’s, so I could listen unfettered by the camera.

Rams' Pocket Radio at BD Riley's 14 March 2014

After Rams’ Pocket Radio, I stepped outside and around the corner for the aforementioned interview with Heathers, which you can read here. On my way back in, I noticed that there was a passing crowd gathered outside B.D. Riley’s, listening to the music from the open air stage. The space outside the venue proved to be a popular gathering place and was almost as full as the inside bar area for most of the day.

Mary and I were both excited to hear the Wonder Villains play again after speaking with them at the British Music Embassy on the Monday night. We were once again somewhat amazed by the colorful attire of the Wonder Villains’ leading ladies, Eimear Coyle and Cheylene Murphy. But more importantly, we were also amazed by the band’s high-spirited performance. Their latest single, ‘Marshall’, had been playing on the PA system between sets, and by the time the band played it live, everyone in the bar was singing and dancing along, including our indefatigable editor.

Wonder Villains at BD Riley's 14 March 2014

Mary ducked out after the Wonder Villains played, leaving me to the saccharine-sounding garage pop charms of Dott. Their single ‘Small Pony’ is every bit as bouncy and danceable as ‘Marshall’, but Dott were, inevitably, more reserved on stage than the bright and brash Wonder Villains. Little wonder, as I discovered later that they were nearing the end of a full American tour. Their tour diary for the trip, including their time at SXSW, can be viewed here.

Dott at BD RIley's 14 March 2014

I was practically dancing with excitement myself to hear the next band on the playbill, The Young Folk. I’d met them briefly on the Wednesday night at Maggie Mae’s Gibson Room and gotten a sneak preview of their forthcoming album, ‘The Little Battle’, and frankly, I was already hooked. Their live performance didn’t disappoint, despite the number of instruments they had to squeeze onto the tiny stage.

Young Folk at BD Riley's 14 March 2014

Young Folk at BD Riley's 14 March 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Songs from ‘The Little Battle’ predominated the set, but The Young Folk also included non-album tracks ‘A Song About Wolves’ and ‘Hold On To Your Hat’. I was impressed most by their ability to convey the tender lyrical moments in their songs without dampening the lively mood of the crowd. Their relaxed but animated performance style was definitely a hit among those in attendance at B.D. Riley’s

Young Folk at BD Riley's 14 March 2014

Note ‘The Little Battle’ CD taped to Anthony’s guitar.

After The Young Folk played their set, I ducked outside again for an interview with them, which you can read here if you haven’t already. They proved to be quite easy to talk to, and before I knew it, I had missed most of the next set inside the venue. When I came back in, September Girls were rocking the stage with their reverb, rhythm and vocal harmonies. I did manage to peek between the enthusiastic patrons at the front to snap a few quick photos before the band wrapped up.

September Girls at BD Riley's 14 March 2014

Mary returned from her own afternoon interview adventures with DJ Colette and Until the Ribbon Breaks and checking out some of the day’s activities at British Music Embassy in time to catch the last two bands on the schedule, WOUNDS and Kid Karate. I would never have guessed that she would be a fan of either band, but the bass player in her showed through as she headbanged along with WOUNDS.

Mary at BD Riley's 14 March 2014

Editor Mary got her groove on.

Both WOUNDS and Kid Karate required the use of earplugs, especially at the close range where we were seated. Of the two, WOUNDS were definitely the harder, heavier thrashing rock, but they managed to keep their performance confined to the stage.

WOUNDS at BD Riley's 14 March 2014

Kid Karate, on the other hand, were not inclined to that much restraint. By the end of their brazenly bluesy set, guitarist and front man Kevin Breen had completely abandoned drummer Steven Gannon to join the audience for an impromptu moshing session. It was the perfect surprise ending to what had been a showcase full of variety and high quality music.

Kid Karate at BD Riley's 14 March 2014

Kid Karate at BD Riley's 14 March 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once again, I hated to leave after the end of the showcase. Part of my mind lingered at B.D. Riley’s when I dashed off to my next appointment, even as I eagerly anticipated the Communion Records showcase that was still to come at St. David’s Episcopal Church.

Thanks to Brian, Ciaran and Jim for their assistance with interviews and photos at this event. (And special thanks to Angela and the staff at B.D. Riley’s for their help in rescuing my lost voice recorder!)

 

SXSW 2014: eating Irish breakfast at B.D. Riley’s and chatting with new friends on Friday afternoon – 14th March 2014

 
By on Wednesday, 26th March 2014 at 2:00 pm
 

At some point in your SXSW experience, it is inevitable, do not fight it: you will hit a wall. Your body and brain will be close to shutting down from all the running around and shenanigans you have been up to all week. By Friday morning, I’d hit my own personal wall. The mere thought of going through the exercise of figuring out various walking and bus routes for a trip out of town for a show just didn’t seem enticing at all. What was far more appealing was the traditional free Irish breakfast served every Friday morning at SXSW at where else but B.D. Riley’s?

It was also a chance to spend some quality time with the lovely Angela Dorgan, who tirelessly runs the Music from Ireland programming at the festival every year and who happens to be a dear friend. While I was disappointed in the complete lack of black pudding, rashers and mushrooms in my fry up, the eggs scrambled and not sunny side up, and the tomatoes raw and sliced as if they were ready to go into a BLT, it was the strange appearance of two slices of entirely uncooked rye bread that had my friends back in blighty confused. However, it was good, hearty sustenance that both Carrie and I needed to start our day off right, though the food was more important to me than it was to Carrie, who needed her coffee.

SXSW 2014 was the first time in 3 years straight of covering SXSW that I decided to take a load off and relax a little and have a cardiovascular workout to the Wonder Villains. Carrie covered the Irish breakfast and afternoon line-up at B.D. Riley’s, staying in her place all afternoon, while I could chill before my next social engagement. Scanning my Twitter feed, I noticed DJ Colette was in town to do a late night DJ set with friends at Lanai Lounge, an ubercool dance space and bar on Congress where Carrie and I had met up with our Canadian friend Jordy on Monday afternoon. I took a chance at Tweeting at her to see if she’d be willing to do an entirely impromptu interview. That’s how this interview with her at the Hilton happened. And that’s how we roll at SXSW.

My next interview to take place at Latitude 30 had been arranged the afternoon before at the Universal Music Group takeover on Thursday and would be with Pete Lawrie-Winfield, better known as the man behind Until the Ribbon Breaks. (Listen to the interview here.) I watched him perform again and this time, he had a much larger and captive audience at the British Music Embassy, which I was very pleased about. I think of what I hear on top 40 radio here in the States and the Radio 1 playlist, and the direction mainstream pop music has gone doesn’t excite me. What does excite me about what Lawrie is doing is how he incorporates the best of his own personal influences as if putting everything he loves in a electronic blender of sorts, and what comes out is this multi-pronged animal of sound.

When Delphic first really hit UK radio in 2009 with ‘Counterpoint’, a lot was made about their rock and dance hybrid sound being novel. If that’s true, Until the Ribbon Breaks’ mixing of rock, dance, r&b, experimental and of course electronic is truly trailblazing. It’s a bit of a problem that I’m the only one at TGTF who loves electronic and dance music, so I’m hoping my fellow writers – and some of you too! – will listen to this track ‘Perspective’ and maybe have a change of heart. The best electronic music will make you want to dance and will make you feel sexy, and as far as I’m concerned, Lawrie’s doing an excellent job on both fronts.

I hung around for THUMPERS, who were next and had been highly recommended by friends, but I was sorely disappointed. Maybe I was stood in the wrong place, but the thumping (no pun intended) of the bass was drowning out anything and everything else, including the vocals, so I didn’t stay too long. Too bad. Well, you can’t win them all and you are going to encounter some bands that just don’t live up to their promise live in Austin. But I had an interview lined up in early evening that I was positively going out of my mind thinking about, so all was not lost. Not at all.

 

SXSW 2014: Creative Belfast night at Latitude 30 – 10th March 2014

 
By on Tuesday, 18th March 2014 at 3:00 pm
 

Photos by editor Mary Chang

When I arrived in Austin on the Sunday prior to the start of the SXSW 2014, I was already gleefully anticipating the Creative Belfast showcase at the British Music Embassy on the Monday night. Though the Music portion of SXSW didn’t officially begin until Tuesday, the Northern Irish event was a sort of transition show that included music as well as Film and Interactive components from the week before.  The names and faces of the non-musicians were mostly unfamiliar to me, but the lovely sound of Northern Irish accents filling the room kept a smile on my face throughout the evening.

If you’ve read my past writing, you’ll know that some of my favorite musicians are from Northern Ireland, and a few of them were on hand for the event at Latitude 30, the downtown Austin club that was overtaken by the British Music Embassy for the week.  The master of ceremonies for the evening was none other than BBC Radio 1 presenter Phil Taggart, and on the docket were Belfast-based acts UNKNWN, Wonder Villains, and Rams’ Pocket Radio. Unfortunately, Mary and I missed UNKNWN’s set, but don’t fret, because he became known to us later in the week.  We were lucky enough to see and interview both of the other acts; click here for Wonder Villains and here for Rams’ Pocket Radio.

The exuberant Wonder Villains played a bright and lively set to match their attire for the evening, despite the rain coming down outside. Their newest single, ‘Marshall’, was an instant hit; in fact it was featured on the PA system at the British Music Embassy throughout the week.  But it was an older tune, ‘Zola,’ that really got the crowd moving, especially after lead singer Eimear Coyle’s explanation that it was inspired by Italian footballer Gianfranco Zola.  The band’s upbeat tunes can probably be best described as pure fun, and their colorful outfits were equally fun to photograph.

Decidedly more difficult to photograph was Rams’ Pocket Radio, whose emphatic stage movements were tricky to catch on camera.  His darker and more dramatic sound was enhanced by the full complement of talented Northern Irish musicians he brought with him to Austin:  Sabrina Rodgers on violin, Thomas Camblin on drums, Adam Booth on bass, and Travis Gilbert on guitar. (Stay tuned for a feature on Gilbert’s band, Travis is a Tourist, in the Tuesday recap.)  Rams’ Pocket Radio’s set list was comprised of several tracks from his album, ‘Béton’, most notably the eponymous and inevitable ‘Dieter Rams Has Got The Pocket Radios’ and new single ‘Love Is A Bitter Thing’.

After some quick chat in the rain outside Latitude 30, Mary and I headed off to the Clive Bar to see Welsh rockers The Joy Formidable.  You can read Mary’s recap of Monday’s events, including that gig, by clicking here.

 

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2014: Artists from Ireland and Northern Ireland showcasing at this year’s SXSW

 
By on Wednesday, 5th March 2014 at 1:00 pm
 

Please note: all information we bring you about SXSW 2014 is to the best of our knowledge when it posts and bands scheduled to appear may be subject to change. To learn when your favourite band is playing in Austin, we recommend you first consult the official SXSW schedule, then stop by the band’s Facebook and official Web site for details of any non-official SXSW appearances.

This installment of the TGTF Guide to SXSW 2014 explores the contingent of SXSW 2014 showcasing bands from Ireland and Northern Ireland. These acts range from traditional folk to pure electronic, with a healthy dose of plain old pop and rock falling somewhere in between.

Cian Nugent is listed on the SXSW 2014 schedule as being in the “avant/experimental” category. His expansive, virtuosic solo electric guitar compositions are backed by traditional rock instruments, including electric bass and drums, as well as more orchestral bowed strings, woodwinds, and brass. His latest LP ‘Born With the Caul’, released in November 2013, is his first recording with a fully dedicated band. Cian Nugent and The Cosmos are currently touring in America leading up to SXSW.

[youtube]http://youtu.be/ITuigRBWhlM[/youtube]

Dott are a “shiney, harmony-driven guitar pop” band hailing from Galway. Their laid back, low-fi debut album ‘Swoon’ was released on Graveface Records in December 2013; stream it here. For a quick sampling of their sound, take a listen to ‘Love You Too’.

Heathers are Dublin twin sisters Ellie and Louise Macnamara. Their mainstream guitar pop second album, ‘Kingdom’, was released in the UK in September 2012 and nominated for that year’s Meteor Choice Music Prize for Best Irish Album. It is due for release in America on the 8th of April via SonyRED, just after the band’s appearance at SXSW. The album’s first single ‘Forget Me Knots’ has already scored over 250,000 YouTube hits.

[youtube]http://youtu.be/BTLbR80pIqY[/youtube]

Hozier is the stage name of County Wicklow’s Andrew Hozier-Byrne, a soulful singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist whose poignant single ‘Take Me To Church’ turns romantic love into a religious experience. Already receiving radio play in America, the track was nominated for the Meteor Choice Prize Song of the Year. March looks to be a busy month for Hozier, with the release of his EP, ‘From Eden,’ and his appearance at SXSW, along with his St. Patrick’s Day birthday.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MYSVMgRr6pw[/youtube]

Dublin rock duo Kid Karate have been compared to the likes of Jack White and The Black Keys. Their brash, bluesy brand of rock seems more sonically suited to stadiums than the small venues of SXSW, but they are sure to make their boisterous presence known in Austin next month. They have just finished recording their debut long player ‘Night Terrors’, to be released later this year. Be sure to adjust your volume settings before streaming their first single, ‘Two Times’.

Rams’ Pocket Radio is the stage moniker for Northern Irish solo artist Peter McCauley. He is categorized by SXSW organizers as pop, but based on his opening performance for Foy Vance last year (reviewed here), I’d say his keyboard-based rock is more experimental or progressive than most pop artists. Think Ben Folds without the flippancy. Despite its unwieldy title, Rams’ Pocket Radio’s eponymous tune ‘Dieter Rams Has Got The Pocket Radios’ is a surprisingly infectious earworm.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hND_DFhyQNA[/youtube]

Female garage pop band September Girls are aptly named for a Big Star song once covered by The Bangles. The fuzzy guitars and vocal harmonies on ‘Heartbeats’ are a slightly scuzzier version of The Bangles’ signature sound. The single features on September Girls’ debut album,‘Cursing the Sea,’ which was released in January on Fortuna Pop! Records.

The Strypes’ official Web site describes the band as “a 4-piece rhythm and blues band hailing from Cavan, Ireland,” and their single ‘Blue Collar Jane’ clearly pinpoints their style as reminiscent of the early Beatles R&B sound. Their first EP release ‘Young, Gifted & Blue’ is a set of four homemade recordings of classic blues songs, including a cheeky version of Bo Diddley’s ‘You Can’t Judge a Book by the Cover’. ‘Blue Collar Jane’ appears on the band’s debut LP ‘Snapshot’, released in September 2013. Their latest EP release ‘4 Track Mind’ coincided with their February tour dates in the UK, which included several sold out shows.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZb8nEemK2k[/youtube]

Unknown is the professional name of Belfast music producer Chris Hanna, who began his career attempting to create his music anonymously and without hype. He started producing music in 2012 with a series of tracks titled simply ‘#001’ – ‘#010’. He currently performs with vocalist Gemma Dunleavy under the stage name of UNKNWN, but the official SXSW schedule lists him as “Unknown,” which might imply that he will be performing solo at the festival. Check out the groove of ‘#008’ below.

Indie pop wunderkinds the Wonder Villains hail from Derry, Northern Ireland and have already become major players on the Northern Irish music scene. They released two singles on No Dancing Records, ‘Ferrari’ and ‘Zola’, the latter of which was playlisted on BBC Radio 1 in February 2012. Their spunky forthcoming single ‘Marshall’ is due out on the 24th of March. After SXSW, the Wonder Villains are expected to return to the studio to finish their debut album, ‘Rocky’, which is scheduled for release in June.

[youtube]http://youtu.be/A-OP2FxCB6c[/youtube]

Dublin punk outfit WOUNDS released their first EP ‘Dead Dead Fucking Dead’ and began work on their debut LP before guitarist James Coogan fell from a four-story balcony and spent 3 months on life support. After Coogan’s painful recovery, Wounds licked their wounds and moved forward, releasing the LP ‘Die Young’,in January 2013. Listen to the merciless thrashing of ‘Dead Dead Fucking Dead’ below.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lKnGvlYetU[/youtube]

The Young Folk, as you might have already guessed, are a folk quartet of a “certain youthful age”, according to the bio on the band’s Web site. Their brand of folk pop includes subtle and eclectic instrumentation, introspective lyrics, and lightly lilting vocals along with a relentlessly energetic performing style. Having recently signed with ARC Music UK, The Young Folk are set to release their debut album in the early part of 2014.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rm8gYScu2Xw[/youtube]

 

SXSW 2012: Day 2 – Northern Ireland showcase at Tap Room at Six – 15th March 2012

 
By on Monday, 26th March 2012 at 1:00 pm
 

Sometimes, even in the competitive world of music blogging, an editor needs to take time out for herself. One of the SXSW showcases I was most looking forward to hunkering myself down at was the Northern Irish showcase being put on at the Tap Room at Six on Wednesday night. Oddly, the line-up was pretty much the same at British Music Embassy’s Monday night show at Latitude 30, so had I arrived a day earlier, I could have caught that bill instead, but I suppose it was just my good luck that the three of the bands from Monday night were performing together once again. Wasn’t a huge fan that the stage was so high up that I got neck sprain, just like at Philly’s Trocadero, but beggars can’t be choosers, can they?

The first band on were the Wonder Villains from Derry. I’d first heard of them after last month when they received the glowing nod of approval from Steve Lamacq on his weekly New Favourite Band feature on 6music. Musically, they sound a lot like General Fiasco, who we’ve written about a lot here on TGTF, except they’re made up of two girls and two guys and they have a female lead singer, Eimear Coyle, who came out on stage in an Iron Maiden t-shirt, hot pink leggings, and a gigantic daisy nested in the organised chaos that was her hair. Then you looked at backing singer / keyboardist Cheylene Murphy, with her bright red feather earrings and appropriately tropical outfit of red and turquoise. A strong look, but this is Austin and SXSW, so it worked. So what are they like live? Think superhero (superheroine?) choruses that were infectious as hell and bouncy guitar that everyone’s going for these days. Combine that with a youthful exuberance that makes you wish you were 15 again, running out of town with their ‘Ferrari’ (video below) as you do when you’re young with no responsibilities, not worrying about money or where you’re going in life. Sigh.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auFtYm4wWWw[/youtube]

I thought it might be a stretch to relate to these kids so much younger than myself, but Coyle was going on about their song ‘Calgary’ that was written after they’d watched the Disney film Cool Runnings (you remember it I’m sure, about the scrappy Jamaican bobsled team) and I just had to laugh, knowingly, to myself. If anything, this is the kind of band that’s destined to be big with the Disney crowd (and that’s not a dig by any means, by the way).

I always have a different outlook on bands after I’ve interviewed them and they’ve revealed themselves to nice people and not posturing, obnoxious snobs. So I viewed my impending first view of Belfast’s General Fiasco in gigging mode with much excitement. I think I’d like to sum up their performance with one word: wheeeeeeeeeee! Having only ever heard their sound through the internet, I already knew I was in for frantic guitar lines and driving beats but wow, I was simply blown away. I don’t know how these guys don’t have an American record contract yet. Seriously.

I had connected with ‘Waves’ on initial listen; Owen Strathern’s declaration of “and I go back like a wave to the shore / I don’t think about you much now anymore” rings true to anyone who’s trying to get back on their feet after a break-up. But you can get over someone this way, admitting to your mistakes and being ok with it all, it’s so much more enjoyable. And this was a definite highlight of the set; as the title track off their November 2011 EP, it’s a definite step up in maturity from their ‘Rebel Get By’ early days, as was ‘Don’t You Ever’, another newer song. A new album’s purported to be along the way later this year, and I couldn’t be more delighted.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwTQRvFTXro[/youtube]

The last band I’d see in this showcase would be Cashier No. 9. If you recall, I saw them play a triumphant set at London XOYO in November. I already knew then that they had what it took to get a foothold in America, so when I heard they were announced to play SXSW, I had hoped this meant industry execs would get to see them and they’d be offered a record deal up front. (I’ve not heard anything to this effect yet, which is not to say it hasn’t happened already in the last 10 days, but this was my biggest wish after seeing them in London.) While the Wonder Villains and General Fiasco play very in your face guitar rock/pop, I find Cashier No. 9 is a bit harder and possibly more middle of the road in terms of American radio play. Not surprisingly, the Tap Room at Six by this time was pretty packed, which I was pretty pleased with.

Besides being high up, the stage was tiny, and the group crammed all their gear and personnel onto it. At one point in the set, I ended up becoming emergency guitar wrangler down the front because Danny Todd didn’t have a safe place to park his acoustic, so I grabbed it from him and placed it down on the floor in front of me for safekeeping. Despite the claustrophobia while they weren’t physically all over the place as the two that preceded them, the band delivered a blinding yet measured performance. ‘Goldstar’ started the proceedings off with pop punch, which continued all the way to ‘The Lighthouse Will Lead You Out’ (video below), with its psych rock outro, and closing track ‘Goodbye Friend’, an appropriate ending to bid adieu to new friends that you hope you will see again soon, a sentiment I share. Let’s hope they, along with their Northern Irish band friends, will tour worldwide in the very near future.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oem8XMpOBCY[/youtube]

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

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