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Video of the Moment #1726: The Subways

 
By on Thursday, 22nd January 2015 at 6:00 pm
 

The Subways will be releasing their self-titled album – their fourth – on the 9th of February. On the same day, they’ll also be dropping the single ‘Taking All the Blame’, which now has its own promo video. Interestingly, you can watch the band performing the song in this, but not exactly the way I bet you’re imagining it. Watch it below.

Grab ‘The Subways’ when it comes out on the 9th of February on YFE Records / Cooking Vinyl. John’s review of previous single ‘I’m in Love and It’s Burning My Soul’ can be read here; all of TGTF’s coverage on the Subways is this way.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zD0YZsvFin0[/youtube]

 

Single Review: The Subways – I’m in Love And It’s Burning My Soul

 
By on Tuesday, 28th October 2014 at 12:00 pm
 

First up: ‘My Heart is Pumping to a Brand New Beat’.

Second on the bill: ‘I’m in Love And It’s Burning My Soul’.

Who said indie kids were just a bunch of sweaty lads and ladies with greasy hair shouting about their heartbreaks? The archetypal ‘Girls & Boys’ of indie rock ‘n’ roll, The Subways have released their second single in the run-up to the release of their self-titled new album out in February 2015, and they’ve stuck to the tried and tested formula which has made them popular up to now.

They’re not experimenting, and I think that should at least be lauded. The three-piece have a distinct mid-’90s DIY indie-punk vibe about them, and they’re bloody good at making rowdy, simple songs which clock in at just less than 3 minutes. In ‘I’m in Love And It’s Burning My Soul’, Billy Lunn and Charlotte Cooper’s vocals weave through the verses, with a toe-tappingly melodic chorus of the song’s title interjecting.

It probably sounds like more of a throwback to the earliest phases of the band due to the fact this single was borne from some “really old demos” in Billy Lunn’s words. The video mirrors this; it’s a subtle nod to where the band has come from, moving away from the sheened production of songs like ‘Kiss Kiss Bang Bang’ and back to the DIY-esque grit and edge that in 2005 made ‘Rock & Roll Queen’ such a huge indie disco hit – and why it’s still blasted out at a Propaganda near you.

‘I’m in Love And It’s Burning My Soul’ is underscored by the energy that has driven this band through the last 14 years of releases and relentless touring. While the single isn’t exactly a progression, who gives a flying fuck. They’re good at what they do, and who’s to stop them from continuing.

Not me.

8/10

The Subways’ newest single ‘I’m in Love And It’s Burning My Soul’ is out now on YFE Records / Cooking Vinyl. The band’s eponymous fourth album ‘The Subways’ will be released on the 9th of February 2015.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cAVLuS8LxGI[/youtube]

 

Preview: Camden Rocks Festival 2014

 
By on Friday, 11th April 2014 at 3:00 pm
 

Camden Rocks is one of a new breed of urbane festival that has infiltrated the scene across the U.S. and Europe. It requires the special kind of electric setting that can be found in places like Camden and Dublin, or organically grown ala SXSW; the corner of Texas that grew into national new music mecca. On 31 May, 20 venues across the borough will fire up their PAs, and over 200 bands will take to the stage from midday through to the small hours. There’s no mud, no tents and no burst fibreglass urinals. But what it lacks in escapist appeal, it will surely make up for in cultural backdrop and convenience. The Subways are what you might call the conventional headliners, but you can almost guarantee that it will be one of the plethora of lesser known talent that will steal the headlines.

Camden Rocks was conceived as homage to the borough’s staggering influence over the British music scene for the past 50 years. For so long an incubator of fragile new talent – from psychedelia to punk to Britpop – festival promoters have sought to express this diversity with an eclectic line up set across 20 of the town’s famous aural boltholes. It began as a one off, headlined by Pete Doherty and Carl Barat in 2009, and boasted a distinctly London chic, even if its scope was embryonic by comparison.

Resurfacing again in 2013, this year’s line-up is now a leviathan with hundreds of slobbering, stage-hardened heads just waiting to gnaw your face off. Some, like electronic punk rockers Sonic Boom Six, will be returning for another bite after appearing at the festival’s inception, whilst the likes of young guns The Hell will be attempting to muscle in and gain their share of the spoils. And, with festival scene rival Camden Crawl shipped over to Dublin in 2013, the locale will likely be chomping at the bit to host an event that expresses the veracity of the areas musical mythology.

For many, it won’t be headliners The Subways or Reverend and the Makers that are the big draw (although the £25 ticket fee would get you little change from going to see either individually on any other night). It is in the malaise of the lower line-up that the rare stones can be found. Starting at the top, Turbowolf and Orange Goblin will be representing the more traditional end of the hard rock spectrum, whilst Hacktivist’s intense hip hop/metal crossover is sure to compliment the likes of the anarchic Gnarwolves, and slackers Nine Black Alps. Further down the list and there is a thread of uber aggressive noisemakers that can be traced through the likes of Hang the Bastard, Crazy Arm and The Hell – the latter of which are solely responsible for leaving Watford as the wasteland it is today. Even the famous London poseur will be catered for, thanks to Blitz Kids and The Blackout.

It may just be a hyperbole of a standard Camden evening, but when your starting point is the motherland for so many generations of musical genres, the magnification creates a heady brew. It’s on nights like these, when Dr. Martens delve into every dive bar from Dingwalls to Dublin Castle, that you can sense the ghosts of Hendrix, The Rolling Stones, The Clash and Ramones – even Winehouse. On that Saturday in late May, the music of the new generation will do the talking; Camden Rocks has seen to that. But, it’s rare to find a festival at which the talent will be conscious of playing second fiddle to the venue itself.

Tickets and lineup info are available now from the Camden Rocks Web site.

 

Live at Leeds 2012: Roundup

 
By on Thursday, 24th May 2012 at 1:00 pm
 

With the festival season beckoning, the seasonal weather up north has brightened up as some of the brightest upcoming stars look to start their summer crawl on Saturday the 5th of May at Live at Leeds, the same weekend as Camden Crawl and ahead of other upcoming major city festivals. With this 1-day line-up arguably looking stronger than the London weekend this year, it’s difficult to see why you wouldn’t drop up for the day, especially with so many bustling venues in the Leeds city centre within a short walking distance.

Beginning TGTF’s day in the city are Manchester dance band Swiss Lips. Whilst the venue may be difficult to navigate, that may be because it’s rammed in the early afternoon. With indie hit ‘U Got the Power’ having given them some heat, the crowd stay for their infectious breed of ‘sexy pop’ and the band are sure to make some friends with their upcoming debut record.

After this, it’s the atmospheric, but not hugely entertaining iLikeTrains at the O2 Academy. Later, Niki and the Dove also suffer the same fate with a great sound that’s not really matched up front in entertainment. Luckily, there’s so much to see at Live at Leeds that you can never be bored for long. Opening up the Met Uni are Bastille. Their recent mixtape has proved popular with the hundreds that have quickly assembled, and away from their own electropop, the tender vocals of Bastille are the highlight, especially in the cover of City High’s ‘What Would You Do’.

Back at the O2 Academy, Spector flounce about the stage with overly polished indie rock. There’s potential here but the act never really materialises to greater things in the songs, being much more annoying than hoped in the process. This leads to TGTF seeing the end of a powerful Dan Mangan set in Holy Trinity Church followed by a packed show from Lucy Rose. The young singer/songwriter’s music fits perfectly in these surroundings and even the more energetic songs such as ‘Red Face’ sound fitting to her increasingly confident set. With a band behind her, Rose has depth to match her stunning voice and the crowd agree, shh-ing anyone that talks, even in between songs. There’s a muted singalong early on to ‘Middle of the Bed’ and throughout the set there’s a real quality to Lucy Rose’s set that shines in this church. As soon as it starts though, it seems to be over and it’s quickly down to the Cockpit for part one of tonight’s two headliners.

With Ladyhawke making her return to the UK with album two, Lianne La Havas stepping up to the headline mark left by Marina and the Diamonds, there’s a lot of talent on display across the headliners of the festival. TGTF’s route is one of a blend of safety and guaranteed fun in the form of the Subways, followed by Scroobius Pip. First up, the Subways rock out a venue half the size of their most recent tour, making the room sweatier than a sauna and more energetic up-front than most football teams. Blending tracks from all three of their diverse records, noughties classics ‘Rock and Roll Queen’ and “Oh Yeah” fit in with the likes of ‘Shake Shake’ and new single ‘Kiss Kiss Bang Bang’ as ‘It’s A Party’ turns lead singer Billy Lunn’s trademark stage dive into a venue-long crowdsurf to the back, up onto the sound-desk and then a dive from 10 feet back down and towards the stage (did you follow that, we nearly didn’t). The man’s got balls, and the Subways still rock.

Closing the night with a set starting long past 11, Scroobius Pip executes a well thought out and powerful set of his solo material to the underground venue. Even without B Dolan by his side on tour, Pip’s tracks have venom and everyone present joins in with every lyric from last year’s record. There’s crowd surfing, huge men bashing each other about and one man with an MCA-stolen VW badge on his necklace up front leading the events. It’s a fitting way to end the night, and TGTF can’t help but feel that the right decisions were made. It’s going to be a bright summer for so many of the artists on the bill at Live at Leeds, there’s no doubt about that, but definitely watch out for the likes of Lucy Rose and Swiss Lips, and by no means underestimate those who’ve been around the block.

 

Live Review: The Subways with the Dancers and the Computers at London Koko – 4th October 2011

 
By on Friday, 14th October 2011 at 2:00 pm
 

Koko is crammed. Tickets tonight sold out almost as soon as tonight’s headliners released their latest album. The bill has two rising acts on it worth checking out and on a Tuesday evening, what could possibly be better than going to a show such as this one? Yes, tonight, the Subways are in town touring their third offering, ‘Money and Celebrity’, and they’ve brought the Computers and the Dancers along with them for good measure.

The evening starts off with a pop offering from new French act the Dancers. With a sound not too dissimilar from Alphabeat, it’s undeniable that they’re catchy, but it’s hard to tell whether that’s a good thing or not. Their Subways-style lineup with indie pop never really lights up the place but they’re endearing to the point of smiles even if the music lacks genuine character.

Thankfully, bringing a whole different sound to Camden tonight are the Computers. Self professed as the Hives meet Black Flag is a big ask, but within seconds of their more than electric set beginning, you can tell why. If Pulled Apart By Horses have opened up a gap in the industry, the Computers have definitely come along at the right time to fill it as screaming with catchy tracks is what they do best. Choosing to spend more time off stage than on, their front-man is certainly enigmatic and the tunes aren’t half bad either. Hopefully you’ll be hearing a lot more from the men in white in the future.

Tonight’s main event is the Subways. With their Pledge Music project gaining them fan recognition as well as involving a whole lot of planning, this tour is the big one in which we find out if it was worth it. Opening with debut single proper ‘Oh Yeah’ and racing through five well known old tracks from ‘Young for Eternity’ and ‘All Or Nothing’, ‘We Don’t Need Money To Have A Good Time’ is greeted with plenty of enthusiasm as the packed crowd really seem to have taken in the new record with open arms. The new single nestles in well with old material as do the likes of ‘I Wanna Dance With You’ and ‘Celebrity’. It’s of course the older hits that give tonight such a special feel as first album opener ‘I Wanna Hear What You Have Got To Say’ brings a respite for jumping and instead gives a room filling sing-along to Koko’s glorious layout. ‘Rock and Roll Queen’ is getting old these days and the trio don’t drag it out like they used to, now content on playing it mid-set and letting it live amongst the back catalogue. Closing their main set with ‘With You’ feels fitting, with “my best days are with you. They are so easy” being the last words of the main event.

In true rock and roll style of course, there’s an encore. Not content with the earlier circle pit for ‘Turnaround’, which engulfed most of the main standing area, frontman Billy Lunn chooses ‘Money and Celebrity’’s lead single ‘It’s a Party’ to do some of his trademark stage jumping and plays around in the crowd for a while before setting his sights on higher things. Making an ambitious 15-foot dive from a balcony, the willing crowd takes him with outstretched arms and sends him back to the stage. Even security look mildly impressed as they’re thanked for their good work.

‘Money and Celebrity’ may be the Subways’ most pop album to date, after all, they’ve gone from being in the studio with Butch Vig (Nirvana, Foo Fighters) to Stephen Street (Blur, the Smiths), but it’s still a rock party when the Subways roll into town. Add a bit of gloss, and you’ve got a killer Koko show.

 

Best of 2008: Live

 
By on Tuesday, 30th December 2008 at 10:22 am
 

Idlewild @ ULU - 3rd July 2008

10. Idlewild at London’s ULU (3rd July)
First time catching the indie rockers, blown away. So much so that I caught them again in Bristol just a month later, they were that good. They showed just how they’ve managed to be so successful for the past decade, with energy and great songs.

9. I’m From Barcelona at London Scala (25th November)
I know I said I’d write a review and then didn’t, but things were kinda hectic with university stuff at the time. Still, I’m From Barcelona provided one of the best nights of entertainment I’ve had in a while – chaotic, crazy, they had so much energy I was finding bits of ticker tape for days after.

8. Bloc Party at London’s Apple Store (10th October)
My second Bloc Party experience of the year, hot and sweaty in the Apple Store. I was expecting a bland, boring performance but we got anything but – chaotic, Kele was on top form, crawling over the crowd, standing all over the place. I’d hate to have had the job of cleaning up the next morning!

7. Friendly Fires at Oxford Zodiac (5th October)
My second time seeing Friendly Fires, they were even more intense than the first time. Loud, energetic, and slightly chaotic – we forgot it was Sunday night and danced like it was 3am. Just immense. Watch them become huge in 209.

Continue reading Best of 2008: Live

 
 
 

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There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

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