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Video of the Moment #2430: The Big Moon

 
By on Thursday, 24th August 2017 at 6:00 pm
 

You know that Ardyn video I posted on Monday? I mentioned in it how much I love collaborations and friendships that last. Back in March at SXSW 2017, I watched Marika Hackman perform at the British Music Embassy with her backing band, who just happened to be The Big Moon.

Hackman has now returned the favour, appearing in the London group’s latest promo video. In ‘Pull the Other One’, a track from The Big Moon’s ‘Love in the 4th Dimension’ reviewed by Rebecca here, Hackman appears as the black-clad baddie as the gals in the band try their hand at sleuthing. Who wins out, and what’s the ultimate prize? You’ll have to watch the entire video with the lovely ladies below. For more of our past coverage here on TGTF on The Big Moon, go here.

 

Deer Shed Festival 2017: Day 2 Roundup

 
By on Tuesday, 1st August 2017 at 2:00 pm
 

Words and photos by Martin Sharman, formerly Head Photographer at TGTF

A rain shower of ferocious but mercifully short intensity awoke all but the most persistent party heads at breakfast time. Saturday is the traditional time when the kids are raring to make a mess and have a party with the smorgasbord of stuff laid on for them, so off we go. There’s crafts galore: painting pots, making milk bottle faces, sewing ra-ra skirts, and creating robot faces out of cardboard boxes. For the little ones, there’s storytelling, and not just your average bedtime effort: this rendition of Bear Hunt ended up in a toddler foam party. Don’t try this at home, kids. Honestly, please don’t. For the older ones, the science tent is where it’s at. There’s countless electronic experiments to take part in, from making basic circuits on cardboard bases, to soldering more complex ones, to taking a screwdriver and a hammer to an enormous pile of obsolete consumer electronics. Music-wise, there was a competition to see who could sing the longest note (I had my eye on the top prize but had to settle for third with 42 seconds), and a multitude of analogue synth and beginners’ DJ classes. The racket from which, as you can imagine, makes the science tent quite an intense experience. Misophonics should steer clear.

Deer Shed 2017

The theme for this year was the Wilderwild, which introduced a completely new area of the festival, devoted to the natural world and humans’ place within it. There was all manner of wild pastimes to have a go at: a stall devoted to a love of hedgehogs, where you could make one out of a pine cone; an actual blacksmith where you could make your own horseshoe in case your steed had lost one; the seemingly innocuous but actually very messy chance to model clay; and a brilliant method of making fire from sticks, which actually works, but is a bit more involved than just rubbing a couple of twigs together. We made a dream catcher. We missed the den building and the live theatre so can only imagine their wondrous delights. In short, what a brilliant and appropriate addition to the festival and one can only hope it becomes a permanent fixture.

Bands-wise, October Drift were impressively active in their morning slot (Teenage Fanclub take note), their proggy songs suddenly jerking into life a bleary early crowd. The Big Moon were brilliant as always and continue the tradition of excellent lady-bands at Deer Shed. Roddy Woomble was the highlight of many people’s weekend with his off-kilter guitar pop.

Happyness at Deer Shed 2017

Stop the press for Happyness. Not satisfied by their performance on Friday night, they were pressed into service for another performance to substitute for a sadly absent booking. And in the flesh they were the best I’ve ever seen. And I’ve seen them a lot. In this writer’s opinion, they are the best art-rock band in the country right now; their offering of surrealist, downtempo art-rock is utterly perfect – there was some involvement of the legs from a high-street window mannekin, and of course scalping Win Butler – they’ve added a keyboard player now but still there is no finer afternoon festival experience than the inscrutable minimalism that is Happyness. They don’t seem that happy but that’s how I end up when I see them. Well done.

The return of Ibibio Sound Machine is a glory to behold. Bringing a flash of African colour to the North Yorkshire countryside, their mere presence is a joyous, uplifting affair – add to that that they play a wonderful mashup of traditional African rhythms, funk, soul, and electro, and further still that singer Eno Williams wears shoulder pads so impressive you could serve Sunday lunch on them, and you have the recipe for a classic Deer Shed appearance. Tea time on Saturday is the musical crescendo of the festival for many: either kids for whom bed isn’t far away, or the parents that have to return to the tent to look after them. To experience such a blast of positivity and extroversion should be the way we all prepare for a decent night’s slumber.

[Those averse to a rant, or are in favour or Ms Kate Tempest should skip the next three paragraphs. You have been warned.]

The worst way to be woken from such repose would be by the awful racket that comes out of Kate Tempest’s mouth, so what better way to drown it out than another droning cacophony: that of a heavy rainstorm atop canvas? Which is exactly what happened. For the exact duration of her set – no shorter, no longer – the heavens gave the site a thorough drenching. Deer Shed themselves reviewed her performance as prophetic. How? Their review was written only the day after. Had anything she prophesied already come true? Did she predict the rain? Does a black cloud follow her around? Or maybe she’s prophetic in the more general sense of being a prophet: a modern-day Chicken Licken who’s come to tell us how awful we all are and how shit the world is. According to the festival, being subjected to “an apocalyptic epic poem about the pain and suffering inflicted on the most deprived members of society” is a fun way to spend a Saturday night, and apparently the pouring rain actually enhanced the experience. The sky is falling! Wicked, man! Blame the Tories!

It’s a truism that one person’s champion of the disenfranchised is another person’s dreary propagandist, and for this writer Kate Tempest falls firmly into the second category. So we have a situation exactly like Billy Bragg in 2015: at least half the festival have NOTHING TO SEE at what should be the climax of the entire weekend. Why Deer Shed should repeat the mistake of headlining a divisive, politically-charged, minimalist solo artist who’s made a career entirely out of invoking leftier-than-thou middle-class guilt at the exact time when everyone should be united in one big pillow of funky togetherness absolutely fails to compute. Moreover, Tempest is a hypocrite of the highest order – she moans about “the gulf that separates us” whilst by her own presence creating that very gulf; she quite shamelessly complains about “ugly words in public spaces” – I couldn’t think of a better way to describe her own perverse, monotone streams of consciousness. I come to festivals for respite from the turbulent political landscape, not to have it thrust before me. I come to festivals to experience beauty and optimism; hers is an ugly, hopeless world. Most importantly, I come to festivals to have fun, and Tempest is no fun at all. The triumphs of Darwin Deez, Johnny Marr and Richard Hawley are but mocking memories.

Apparently the reasoning for the Tempest booking is to attract more “young people” to the festival. Which is deeply patronising and didn’t work out anyway: every person I spoke to, of all ages and shoe sizes, could sum up their opinion of Tempest as “meh”. And is it just me, or are there already more children here than at every other festival in the land? Perhaps by young people they mean young adults, in which case I would have thought that that age have ample choice in the festival market, and to try and attract a group who the vast majority of your usual demographic are paying you good money to avoid, would be something of a mistake. The Big Chill tried that and look what happened to them. The “young adult” that I bumped into who was complaining about losing his block of hashish before promptly consuming most of a discarded and grassy cardboard plate of cold pasta with his bare hands could hardly be called Deer Shed’s target market. Stick to what, and who, you know.

At any rate, the potential disappointment for losing a Saturday headliner was tempered by the fact I didn’t have to get wet listening to them, and that the Obelisk stage actually worked this time. By which I mean the post-Tempest brilliance of Aelfen, who are secretly a heavy metal act disguised as a folk band – they started off innocuously enough, but by the end of their set the tent was rocking. Good stuff. Marc Riley took over for a bit, playing a predictable but nonetheless rewarding set of classic tunes: lots of ‘80s, some Prince, Bowie, et al.

And then – stop the press! – some actual DJing from Manchester-based collective Across the Tracks. Of course you never see real vinyl these days, but these guys were the next best thing, beatmatching like the experts they are, wrangling perfect mixes from the tabled Pioneers. For a while the tent was properly grooving and whooping to a very competent house music set, and finally there was a reason for the “Rave” definition that the programme had so tantalisingly promised. Deer Shed was finally letting its hair down, which is really all we ask of it.

As I left the Obelisk tent, the rain was falling. The ground was slippery mud. Tomorrow could be challenging.

Across the Tracks at Deer Shed

 

Live at Leeds 2017 Preview: editor Mary’s best band bets

 
By on Wednesday, 19th April 2017 at 11:00 am
 

Please note: as we always recommend in all of TGTF’s festival previews, the information we post here on Live at Leeds 2017 is current at the time of posting. We strongly encourage you to check in at the Live at Leeds 2017 official Web site closer to the start of the event to confirm venues and set times. Wristbands for the event in Leeds on Saturday the 29th of April are still available at the bargain price of £32.50 plus handling if purchased online; VIP tickets are sold out. More information on where you can purchase your tickets in person or online is available here.

SXSW 2017 alums: Here’s a list of artists we either saw last month in Austin who we enjoyed AND/OR we previewed ahead of the festival -AND- will also be appearing at Live at Leeds in 2 Saturdays’ time. For your convenience, I’ve listed them in order of appearance on the day so you can slot them into your growing schedule. The best of the best are marked with an asterisk. (*)

LIFE (2:00 PM, Leeds Beckett Union Stage 2 [Dr. Martens Presents]) *
Ten Tonnes (2:00 PM, Chapel) *
Airways (3:00 PM, Leeds Beckett Union Stage 2 [Dr. Martens Presents])
Jade Bird (4:30 PM, Faversham Patio)
Annabel Allum (5:00 PM, Social)
Be Charlotte (5:00 PM, Faversham)
IDLES (7:15 PM, Key Club [DORK Stage])
She Drew the Gun (8:00 PM, Wardrobe)
Temples (8:00 PM, Church)
Lewis Watson (8:15 PM, Holy Trinity Church [Clash Stage])
The Academic (9:00 PM, Lending Room [WTGR Stage]) *
Dream Wife (9:00 PM, Brudenell Social Club [DIY Stage])
Slaves (9:00 PM, Academy)
Flamingods (9:45 PM, Leeds Beckett Union Stage 2 [Dr. Martens Presents])
Rag‘n’Bone Man (9:45 PM, Leeds University Union Refectory)
The Big Moon (10:00 PM, Brudenell Social Club [DIY Stage])
GURR (10:45 PM, Brudenell Social Club Games Room [DIY Neu Stage])
AJ Tracey (11:00 PM, Faversham)
Let’s Eat Grandma (11:00 PM, Chapel)

To add to the best 3 from above and round things out to a even 10 acts, here are an additional 7 I recommend from the fantastic Live at Leeds 2017 schedule:

The Gallery (Wakefield; 12:00 PM, Lending Room [WTGR Stage])
Wakefield is, of course, famous for being the birthplace The Cribs. But the Jarmans should probably get used to sharing the city with another band. The jangly guitars of The Gallery, reminiscent of Arctic Monkeys before they turned into Queens of the Stone Age, will take you back to the simpler times of British indie.

Wyvern Lingo (Wicklow, Ireland; 1:00 PM, Nation of Shopkeepers)
While already deemed national treasures in their country, most people outside Ireland have only heard of Wyvern Lingo from their association with Irish megastar Hozier, their members Karen and Caoimhe providing him backing vocals at live shows and the group supporting him on UK and Irish tours. Imagine the Staves if they’d gone pop and r&b.

Matt Maltese (London; 2:00 PM, Wardrobe)
It took Morrissey a while to be anointed the title ‘The Pope of Mope’. That said, given the current state of world affairs, it stands to reason that there should rightly be more artists coming out and telling it like it is without sugarcoating it. Piano playing Matt Maltese is one of them, coming out with the sweepingly beautiful ‘As the World Caves In’ to convey his despair. Seriously, close your eyes, and you could swear you’re hearing The Moz.

The Wandering Hearts (London; 3:15 PM, Holy Trinity Church [Clash Stage])
A stark contrast to all the indie and pop acts at this year’s Live at Leeds are The Wandering Hearts, an Americana / alt-country group from the big smoke. Recent signees to Decca Records, the band will provide a welcome midday set different from nearly everyone else invited to this event, with their lush harmonies smartly picked guitar.

Paris Youth Foundation (Liverpool; 5:00 PM, Oporto)
The return of Ride to the record shops this year proves the washy guitar wall of sound era isn’t over. Liverpudlians Paris Youth Foundation takes this and does one better by adding synthpop to the mix, lending an anthemic feel to their tracks. Having released their debut album late last year, this is still early days for them, but I reckon now is time to get on the bandwagon.

Tender Central (Devon; 5:15 PM, Holy Trinity Church [Clash Stage])
India Bourne is a Devon-born, classically trained cellist who now goes by the stage name Tender Central. It’s a good description of her sound, which takes full advantage of her ethereal vocals and her careful crafting of an equally evocative, all-enveloping soundscape. Take a moment and consider the thought of seeing such music being performed in a church. Got it?

The Pale White (Newcastle; 5:30 PM, Church)
While Patrick Carney is busy remoulding his girlfriend Michelle Branch, now is an excellent time to discover the band who will dethrone the Black Keys when they aren’t paying attention. While we can’t be sure their successors will be Newcastle’s The Pale White, their brand of down and dirty blues rock is a suitable North East alternative to that of Southampton’s Band of Skulls.

 

SXSW 2017: Wednesday afternoon at the Convention Center and Lustre Pearl’s Feed the Beat day party – 15th March 2017

 
By on Friday, 7th April 2017 at 3:00 pm
 

The Wednesday afternoon at SXSW 2017 was rather a mixed bag of events. If you’ve been following our coverage, you might be sensing a theme in that regard. But variety is the spice of life, as they say, and one can never go too far wrong with all the great acts at SXSW.

My day started with an early interview at downtown Austin’s W Hotel with Los Angeles indie folk rockers Magic Giant. This year marked their third consecutive SXSW, and Wednesday was their last day in town, so I was fortunate to catch them for the interview. After our chat, I was more intrigued than ever by the sound of their forthcoming debut album ‘In the Wind’ and excited to see them play live later in the evening at the Clive Bar. (Coverage of that show, and the rest of my Wednesday night, will post soon.)

"Aldous

Following my appointment with Magic Giant, Mary and I headed to the Convention Center to see singer/songwriter Aldous Harding on the International Day Stage. Harding seemed a bit more comfortable with the Convention Center atmosphere than A.S. Fanning had the day before, and her all-white attire created a rather dramatic effect on the large stage, even so early in the day. Even more striking were the repeated lyrics of her recent single, ‘Horizon’. The track is set to feature on her forthcoming LP release ‘Party’, due out on the 19th of May via 4AD / Flying Nun, but you can preview it just below.

[youtube]https://youtu.be/m4dVkoOMjLo[/youtube]

From the Convention Center, Mary and I both headed down to Rainey Street, but we parted ways shortly thereafter. I decamped to the Lustre Pearl for the Feed the Beat day party while she went next door to Bar 96 (you can read Mary’s recap of Wednesday afternoon back here) The bill at Lustre Pearl for the afternoon included several bands on my “must see” list, and the sunny weather made for a very pleasant couple of hours’ worth of music listening.

Maybird internal

The first act on the bill, New York four-piece psych-rock band Maybird, was completely unfamiliar to me, but they set the tone nicely for a casual outdoor party atmosphere. Their latest track ‘Keep in Line’ was recorded in Nashville with The Black Keys’ Patrick Carney at the production helm, which is as good an indication as any that Maybird is a band on the rise.

The Big Moon internal

English band The Big Moon (pictured in the header photo at the top of the page) were next on the afternoon docket, and they took the stage with a decided air of confidence, despite the sun shining directly into their faces while on stage. The devil-may-care grunge rock of songs like ‘Sucker’ was perfect for the beer-and-tacos atmosphere at the Lustre Pearl, and lead singer Juliette Jackson’s heart-shaped sunnies made a strong impression on the daytime crowd. Don’t miss The Big Moon’s debut LP ‘Love in the 4th Dimension’, due out on the 7th of April.

Mondo Cozmo internal

Los Angeles alt-rocker Mondo Cozmo (known offstage as Joshua Ostrander) had already made a big stir ahead of SXSW with recent single ‘Shine’, and his set at Feed the Beat didn’t disappoint those of us who already had high expectations. ‘Shine’ was naturally the best known of his tracks, but for my money, songs like ‘Higher’ and ‘Chemical Dream’ were equally effective. Mondo Cozmo will be on tour with Bastille through mid-May, ahead of a slew of summer festival dates here in America.

San Fermin internal

I’d been excited to see Brooklyn-based rock collective San Fermin since I reviewed their recent single ‘Open’ back in January. In live performance, the vocal interplay between co-lead singers Allen Tate and Charlene Kaye was even more dramatic, and the vibrant full band brought life to tracks both old (‘Emily’) and new (‘Better Company’, ‘Bride’). San Fermin’s new album ‘Belong’ is out on the 7th of April via Downtown Records.

[youtube]https://youtu.be/eERWM_7_-XI[/youtube]

After San Fermin’s rousing set, I stopped off at the Chi’lantro food truck for some beef bulgogi tacos (hey, a girl’s gotta eat!) on my way back to the Convention Center. I ended the afternoon listening in on a featured conference session with Mick Fleetwood and David Fricke; you can read my previous summary of that conversation right back here.  Stay tuned to TGTF for my review of Wednesday evening’s music events as our coverage of SXSW 2017 continues.

 

(SXSW 2017 flavoured!) Album Review: The Big Moon – Love in the 4th Dimension

 
By on Friday, 7th April 2017 at 12:00 pm
 

The Big Moon Love in the 4th Dimension album coverThere’s been plenty of buzz around The Big Moon, which comprises Juliette Jackson, Soph Nathann, Celia Archer and Fern Ford, ahead of their debut LP, recorded in London. They’ve toured with fellow alt-rockers VANT and Inheaven, as well as supporting The Maccabees and The Vaccines on tour, and have been releasing solid, engaging tracks since they first came together in 2014. It’s been a long wait for ‘Love in the 4th Dimension’, but a worthwhile one. The new record features plenty of the tracks that The Big Moon have released over the past couple of years, including ‘Cupid’, ‘Sucker’ and the more recent ‘Formidable’. It’s the kind of album that’s easy to enjoy for its edgy alt-rock moments, as well as the accessible subject matter of love and relationships in the lyrics.

As you might have come to expect, If you’ve previously heard any of the band’s stuff, you won’t be disappointed by this display of heartfelt pop/rock, produced by a well-oiled machine. There are energetic and brash moments, like on the retro ‘Silent Movie Susie’, and chilled out and easy-going spells such as on the hazy ‘Zeds’, featuring vocal harmonies and a groaning guitar riff. Title track ‘Love In the 4th Dimension’ has the laid-back, confident attitude reminiscent of that of The Last Shadow Puppets’ tracks.

The album begins with ‘Sucker’, which opens with fuzzy guitar before we hear lead singer Juliette Jackson crooning in her distinctive cool and throaty vocals. ‘Sucker’ was first released way, way back in 2015, a time when the UK separating from the EU and the prospect of a wildly coiffed President of the United States were nothing but strange and disconcerting dreams. Like other tracks on the album, ‘Sucker’ tackles the emotions around relationships: “It got darker / Every night / But I wouldn’t change my mind / I’m a sucker for you”, as the title of the album might suggest.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6t3vNfl85E[/youtube]

Another single released from the album, ‘Cupid’, is the oh-so-listenable track that details the oh-so-relatable experience of building something up so much, it’s inevitably not quite going to live up to expectations. It’s as playful as it is bittersweet, with lyrics like, “I’m gonna get this perfectly right / He said, “I’m gonna shoot the perfect bulls-eye” / Draw the arrow back / Steel yourself”. Similar is ‘Happy New Year’, which hits on those feelings of being wistfully aware of growing older and changing, while trying to enjoy the moment. In the chorus, Jackson sings over and over, “I’m never gonna be this young”, hitting on those weird thoughts that we have at the approach of midnight on the 31st of December.

Standout ‘Formidable’ is a bit of a self-affirming powerhouse. The verses are pretty chilled out and steady, before quickly building towards the passionate chorus. Jackson sings, “I am not invisible / I’m on your side / I’ll be formidable”, before almost yelling out, “you let me heal your battle scars”. Supporting someone in time of need and the willingness to be there for them isn’t just a formidable act, it’s an admirable one.

There’s not a song on the album that isn’t likable, and I think it goes to show what a talented group of people can achieve when they have the chance to give time to working on an album rather than rushing to get one put together. All in all, Love in the 4th Dimension is a seriously fun listen. The tracks tie together real emotions and feelings, matched with addictive hooks, simple yet effective lyrics and an obvious love from the band towards the music they play.

9/10

‘Love in the 4th Dimension’, the debut album from The Big Moon, is out today on Startime International / Columbia Records. To read more of TGTF’s past coverage on The Big Moon, go here. Stay tuned for Carrie’s review of the band at SXSW 2017 last month, coming soon to TGTF.

 

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2017: London rock artists showcasing at this year’s SXSW

 
By on Monday, 20th February 2017 at 11:00 am
 

As you might imagine, London leads the charge with the largest number of artists one city in the UK is sending to SXSW 2017. In this post, we introduce you to 17 acts from the capital who are experts in bashing it out on the guitar and drums and hitting you with a powerful voice. Yes, that’s right. Today’s edition of the TGTF Guide to SXSW 2017 is all about the rock bands of London. The summaries below were written by Steven Loftin except where noted. Please note: all information we bring you about SXSW 2017 is to the best of our knowledge when it posts and artists and bands scheduled to appear may be subject to change. To learn when your favourite artist is playing in Austin, we recommend you first consult the official SXSW schedule, then stop by the artist’s Facebook and official Web site for details of any non-official SXSW appearances.

Artificial Pleasure
If the current The 1975 movement is your thing, then you’re welcome: Artificial Pleasure are sure to be a hit for you with their funkadelic, modern and sleazy in all the right ways sound, if you don’t want to dance during recent single ‘I’ll Make It Worth Your While’, then I’m sorry, there’s no hope for you. Although they only formed last year, it’s clear the future is certainly going to be bright for this band and their shows, filled with dancing feet.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9oJL295r90[/youtube]

The Big Moon
At the forefront of the UK’s new indie wave, The Big Moon have heads rockin’ and rollin’ with a beautiful blending of retro sounds with a modern edge. Their debut album ‘Love in the 4th Dimension’ scheduled for release in April is up for pre-order now, and this is definitely a band you will not want to miss out on, especially at SXSW. You can read Rebecca’s review of their single ‘Formidable’ back here.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpW1Es69d9Y[/youtube]

Blueprint Blue
A wonderful ‘60s vibe emanates from South London trio Blueprint Blue. With a hesitating innocence in their sound, all the way down to the wandering notes that fall out of place, it’s fun and light-hearted with no real offence.

Chelou
With a bluesy acoustic sound that builds itself around the use of atmospheric electronica, Chelou has a fresh noise that is filled with mood and melody. Think Chet Faker, with a bit more reserve and accompanied by some pretty sweet animation style videos. To also help you gauge him, consider the word ‘chelou’ is actually a French term for shady or suspicious. Talk about being on brand.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgP9tzt9_Z8[/youtube]

Desert Mountain Tribe
London by way of Cologne, Desert Mountain Tribe are bringing that classic ‘60s garage, psychedelic sound to the modern age. Not messing with the formula too much, they’re raucous and do what they do well. Well worth checking out if you’re a fan of the swinging throwback garage sound.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvzxgB3ucto[/youtube]

Doe
London trio Doe’s ‘wonky alt-pop’ seems to draw directly from ‘90s Britpop, characterised by forceful, yet melodic guitars and a certain level of whimsy. Four years old (pretty long for an indie band these days) and having a whole load of releases under their belt already, their wry humour should set them apart from the rest of the pack in Austin. (Mary Chang)

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k906IGbSaFk[/youtube]

Feeder
A band who really need no introduction, Feeder have been around for decades. If you’ve somehow managed to miss out on their mammoth single ‘Buck Rogers’, then you have our pity and should check it out right now before you do anything else. Roaring back into life this year with new album ‘All Bright Electric’, Feeder are proving there’s life in the old dog yet.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COy_JKXtzvE[/youtube]

Jennings Couch
The oddly named Jennings Couch comprises three graduates of BIMM from Bristol, Brighton and London. There’s not a whole lot for us to go on about this new band; we can’t even share a full song with you, because their Soundcloud are private. What’s not up for disagreement is frontman Lei Jennings’s strong look, somewhere in between Meat Loaf, Fabio and Captain Jack Sparrow. We doubt they’ll be bringing a sofa with them, but we’ll report in from Austin about their live show if we can. (Mary Chang)

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wL3fWDHW5Wo[/youtube]

Joey Fourr
Joey Prendergast used to be part of Tubelord, but since 2012 he’s been associated with London trio Joey Fourr. Lo-fi seems to be the word in rock these days, especially in America, so it’s not hard to imagine their tunes going over well in Austin, even if the group insist that their style of music is “WONK-POP 4 QUEER KIDS”. (Mary Chang)

Mantra
Pretty furious in sound and attitude, Mantra (pictured at top) are another one of those upcoming bands with a chip on their shoulder and representing their generation. Songs about being outcasts in the world at large, they match this with good, old-fashioned solid rock ‘n’ roll with a bit of spit.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVGqb9gJnSw[/youtube]

Modern English
Formed in the late Seventies, Modern English are perhaps best known for their 1982 single ‘I Melt With You’, a song that soundtracked countless romantic moments as well as a Burger King commercial in the States. Releasing their eighth studio album ‘Take Me To The Trees’ in 2016, that was crowdfunded via PledgeMusic, they’ve proven that even with their 30+ years they still have that indie darling pull.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuN6gs0AJls[/youtube]

Saint Leonard’s Horses
Reimagining himself and taking a band with him under the guise of Saint Leonard’s Horses, London songwriter Kieran Leonard has all the tales and all the talent. Having supported everyone from Ryan Adams to The Libertines, Leonard and his Horses know how to take you on a journey and give one hell of a ride.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yOEjGV1ey3U[/youtube]

Shame
Shame, five teenage friends from Brixton, relish taking their shirts off onstage in the moment (hmm, Red Hot Chili Peppers much?). There isn’t much online on the band, but that’s because they’re just getting started. There’s another reason behind this: they’re being very careful about their image and making sure their sound is exactly what they want to unveil to the world. Their approach has paid off: they’ve already caught the eyes and ears of BBC Radio 6 Music’s Steve Lamacq, playing live for him in January as part of 6 Music Live. And they won’t be lying down after their close-up at SXSW 2017: they will be returning triumphantly to the UK for their support slot for California rockers Warpaint’s live dates in late March. No shame here. (Mary Chang)

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yMcv1pn6xnU[/youtube]

Skinny Girl Diet
It feels like 2017 could be the year Skinny Girl Diet thrive. Part of the Riot Grrrl movement, Skinny Girl Diet are as DIY and hardcore you can get and won’t take any of your crap. Young and riotous with an actual message, they sure haven’t forgotten the important platform provides for social protest. [The Fader in America have already picked up wind of these gals, so don’t drag your feet. –Ed.]

Splashh
Gearing up to release their second album ‘Waiting A Lifetime’ in April, Londoner’s Splashh are heading to Texas to make a…well…a splash. Indie rock at its finest, none too offensive and easily listened to.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DR2w5cqHcic[/youtube]

This Be the Verse
Time for something a little bit heavier and constructed. This Be the Verse is a new project fronted by one man that somehow has unrestrained power, yet twists it into cleverly constructed and sinister tracks. His self-titled debut album is an industrial horrorscape of brilliance and savagery.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q6hNr-YGfwo[/youtube]

Ultimate Painting
More English indie rock, as only we can do it. Heartbreaking, yearning and like a rainy night in Manchester, Ultimate Painting also use influences such as Velvet Underground to attack with a more reserved chagrin. Being tipped by many UK outlets, they’re one band that 2017 is looking to be a real good time for.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5oopzYgvydg[/youtube]

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

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