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SXSW 2014 Interview: Casual Sex

 
By on Thursday, 27th March 2014 at 11:00 am
 

Ah yes, the band on everyone’s lips, Casual Sex. (In case you haven’t figured this out yet, it’s very important to refer to the band with their proper name to avoid embarrassment in the wrong company…) They had a whirlwind of a week gigging, playing in all sorts of places across Austin, but I would have imagined that their Friday night appearance, surrounded by their fellow countrymen at the Showcasing Scotland night at the British Music Embassy was particularly special for them. It was certainly special to me, even from the get-go: once inside Latitude 30, I was greeted by a burly yet kindly man in a kilt!

It was amazing to have all four members of Casual Sex – Sam Smith, Ed Wood, Pete Masson and Chris McCrory – sat down next to me for this great interview in which we talked about their brilliant week in Austin including the amazing food, where the band name came from (come now, we all wanted to know that surely, yeah?), and they talk to me about Glasgow as well.

Also of note: usually it’s me bringing things to shows for the bands I know, but this night, I was the one to be surprised. Many, many thanks to the guys who brought me a special EP as a present and signed it for me. It is now installed in a place of honour on my desk at work. Cheers guys for your time and your kind present!

 

SXSW 2014: Friday night free-for-all via London, Tokyo and Glasgow – 14th March 2014

 
By on Wednesday, 26th March 2014 at 3:00 pm
 

After my rather chill Friday daytime experiences at the Irish breakfast at B.D. Riley’s and interviewing some fab folks, it was time to get back to work. First things first, however. I arrived early to the Mohawk to meet up with Sivu for a cheeky chat at the Omni before his soundcheck at the House of Vans evening showcase there. He turned out to be one of the loveliest people I’ve ever met, and to be honest, being able to see him with a full band and full set up at Liverpool Sound City is the one of the main reasons I’ve decided to visit England in May. Not saying that I didn’t like his stripped back performance with guitarist and backing vocalist Lucy Parnell, but I just have this image in my head – and can hear in my ears – that the full experience will be 1,000,000x better.

Sivu is just finding his feet release-wise in America, recently having signed a deal with Canvasback Music, who have released music by alt-J here in the States, and if you listened to my interview with him, this association makes total sense. But as he is relatively unknown in our country, it’s not a huge surprise that a set so early in the evening (8 PM on the nose) didn’t attract a huge group of people. However, I met a girl in the queue outside and convinced her further that she should stay; she did, and she thoroughly enjoyed the set, as did I. While the song collboration of ‘I Hold’ Sivu did with Marika Hackman sounded bare, Parnell did an amazing job standing in for Hackman and the combined vocals of hers and Sivu’s were amazing. The stripped back version of last year’s single ‘I Lost Myself’ was mesmerising, and it was like the Mohawk indoor stage, with its boudoir lighting and red walls, were custom made to go with it.

Not sure what I would do after Sivu, my new friend said that the Japan Nite at Elysium would be a good shout. I then realised it might be the only time I might run into my good mate Johnny Au, Head Photographer at The AU Review. Was I right, or what? He was down the front, covering the entire showcase. I had no prior knowledge of Jungles of Red Bacteria Vacuum from Tokyo, but whoa mama, they were certainly different than anything else I had been seeing all week in Austin. Originally from Osaka, I’ve read they’ve suffered from various band member changes, but whatever they’ve done to get to this place, the all-girl, all-punk band now based in the capital of Japan rock out with a ferocity that I really needed to see and hear that night. I now own one of their albums called ‘Pleased to Eat You’. Not exactly my usual British pop fare, yeah?

After the face melting experienced at Elysium, I headed back down to British Music Embassy to catch a band whose name is guaranteed to elicit a giggle from anyone aged 8 to 80 for as long as they persist to exist. Casual Sex, the indie rock band based in Glasgow, have been dogged by comparisons to Franz Ferdinand ever since they made their first appearance in the blogosphere. However, I get the feeling from with the ease that singer/guitarist Sam Smith applied lipstick on himself, explaining he wanted to be more like us girls, he’s been doing this far longer than Nick McCarthy in the recent comical video for ‘Erdbeer Mund’.

However, while the moment of lipstick application could be perceived merely as a gimmick, Casual Sex the live experience (that sounds dirty, not my intention, sorry) was actually more interesting than I expected (as the band were in person too, as evidenced by my interview with them post-gig; stay tuned for this tomorrow) and I think we all should give them credit for taking funk, rock and even a bit of pop, mix them all up, and take them to the next level. Yes, I can see the ‘sexy’ comparisons to Franz, but don’t make the mistake of thinking that’s all they are. Jangly guitars, a funky rhythm section and irresistible vocals? Hello. Just say yes to Casual Sex. Just be sure you use the proper name of the band, for if you don’t, I’m not responsible for any activities you get up to.

My evening was supposed to have ended with an interview with Dems after they played at Buffalo Billiards. But when we arrived at the door to the venue, security told us we could not go in because “we’re counting the money inside”. What the heck does that mean? We must have waited a good 20-25 minutes before I said I was going home. With a signed vinyl all the way from Glasgow in hand, I’d already had an excellent night.

 

SXSW 2014: eating Irish breakfast at B.D. Riley’s and chatting with new friends on Friday afternoon – 14th March 2014

 
By on Wednesday, 26th March 2014 at 2:00 pm
 

At some point in your SXSW experience, it is inevitable, do not fight it: you will hit a wall. Your body and brain will be close to shutting down from all the running around and shenanigans you have been up to all week. By Friday morning, I’d hit my own personal wall. The mere thought of going through the exercise of figuring out various walking and bus routes for a trip out of town for a show just didn’t seem enticing at all. What was far more appealing was the traditional free Irish breakfast served every Friday morning at SXSW at where else but B.D. Riley’s?

It was also a chance to spend some quality time with the lovely Angela Dorgan, who tirelessly runs the Music from Ireland programming at the festival every year and who happens to be a dear friend. While I was disappointed in the complete lack of black pudding, rashers and mushrooms in my fry up, the eggs scrambled and not sunny side up, and the tomatoes raw and sliced as if they were ready to go into a BLT, it was the strange appearance of two slices of entirely uncooked rye bread that had my friends back in blighty confused. However, it was good, hearty sustenance that both Carrie and I needed to start our day off right, though the food was more important to me than it was to Carrie, who needed her coffee.

SXSW 2014 was the first time in 3 years straight of covering SXSW that I decided to take a load off and relax a little and have a cardiovascular workout to the Wonder Villains. Carrie covered the Irish breakfast and afternoon line-up at B.D. Riley’s, staying in her place all afternoon, while I could chill before my next social engagement. Scanning my Twitter feed, I noticed DJ Colette was in town to do a late night DJ set with friends at Lanai Lounge, an ubercool dance space and bar on Congress where Carrie and I had met up with our Canadian friend Jordy on Monday afternoon. I took a chance at Tweeting at her to see if she’d be willing to do an entirely impromptu interview. That’s how this interview with her at the Hilton happened. And that’s how we roll at SXSW.

My next interview to take place at Latitude 30 had been arranged the afternoon before at the Universal Music Group takeover on Thursday and would be with Pete Lawrie-Winfield, better known as the man behind Until the Ribbon Breaks. (Listen to the interview here.) I watched him perform again and this time, he had a much larger and captive audience at the British Music Embassy, which I was very pleased about. I think of what I hear on top 40 radio here in the States and the Radio 1 playlist, and the direction mainstream pop music has gone doesn’t excite me. What does excite me about what Lawrie is doing is how he incorporates the best of his own personal influences as if putting everything he loves in a electronic blender of sorts, and what comes out is this multi-pronged animal of sound.

When Delphic first really hit UK radio in 2009 with ‘Counterpoint’, a lot was made about their rock and dance hybrid sound being novel. If that’s true, Until the Ribbon Breaks’ mixing of rock, dance, r&b, experimental and of course electronic is truly trailblazing. It’s a bit of a problem that I’m the only one at TGTF who loves electronic and dance music, so I’m hoping my fellow writers – and some of you too! – will listen to this track ‘Perspective’ and maybe have a change of heart. The best electronic music will make you want to dance and will make you feel sexy, and as far as I’m concerned, Lawrie’s doing an excellent job on both fronts.

I hung around for THUMPERS, who were next and had been highly recommended by friends, but I was sorely disappointed. Maybe I was stood in the wrong place, but the thumping (no pun intended) of the bass was drowning out anything and everything else, including the vocals, so I didn’t stay too long. Too bad. Well, you can’t win them all and you are going to encounter some bands that just don’t live up to their promise live in Austin. But I had an interview lined up in early evening that I was positively going out of my mind thinking about, so all was not lost. Not at all.

 

SXSW 2014 Interview: The Melodic

 
By on Wednesday, 26th March 2014 at 1:00 pm
 

The weather on the Thursday afternoon of SXSW 2014 couldn’t have been more perfect for the first in a series of Music For Listeners showcases held at El Sapo Cantina, a Tex-Mex burger joint with outdoor seating, just north of downtown Austin. Music For Listeners is a radio show broadcast on San Antonio radio station KRTU and hosted by Michael Thomas and Orlando Torres. Their Thursday lineup included two acts featured here at TGTF, London alt-folk band The Melodic and Scottish singer/songwriter Withered Hand. Due to a prior commitment in the evening, I only had time to catch The Melodic (stay tuned for a detailed report of Thursday evening’s activities!), but their set was entirely worth the special trip.

I think I may have been genetically predestined to fall in love with a band called The Melodic, as I told our wise editor Mary when she suggested that I take a listen to them before SXSW. Good melodies, vocal and/or instrumental, are key to my musical experience, regardless of whether they’re found in a folk, pop, rock, or electronic context. In the case of The Melodic, their catchy and easily singable melodic lines are couched in a traditional folk sound that is liberally flavoured with African and Latin influences as well as dashes of jazz harmony and classical technique that keep things interesting. The band’s energetic set list at El Sapo on the afternoon included their upbeat recent single, ‘On My Way’ and the more introspective ‘Ode to Victor Jara’, both of which appear on their debut album ‘Effra Parade’. But my favorite moment of the afternoon was their performance of a traditional English folk song, ‘Go Your Way’, written by Anne Briggs and sung beautifully here by Lydia Samuels.

The Melodic at El Sapo 13 March 2014

The Melodic, featuring dueling melodicas

After The Melodic’s set, I was able to sit down to an impromptu picnic with Rudi Schmidt, Samuels, and Huw Williams (pictured above), who were kind enough to chat with me while they enjoyed the unique menu offerings from El Sapo. Our delightful discussion touched on the portability of their eclectic instruments, the global influences on their songwriting, and their current American tour.

Special thanks goes out to Orlando, Alex and Sophia for their help with arranging this interview.

SXSW 2014 showcases at El Sapo

 

SXSW 2014 Interview: Sivu

 
By on Wednesday, 26th March 2014 at 11:00 am
 

One of the greatest joys I’ve had as a music editor and writer is meeting my heroes and finding out they’re super nice people in person, nicer than I could have ever imagined. Case in point: Sivu asked me not to use his real name when I interviewed him at the Omni hotel (he also treated me to a drink there, the wonderful man he is), and I had no problem with that at all because he was just so lovely to me.

There is some incidental musical noise, as we were in the atrium of the lobby, not too far off the atrium stage where a country/western band were performing. This is not at all an uncommon occurrence at the Omni during the week of SXSW. If you’ve been following the TGTF SXSW story so far, you might recall I saw 10 for 2012 poll winners, London’s Films of Colour performing there on the Wednesday of SXSW 2012. Sivu also pointed out Steve Lamacq, who was sat near us, trying to look inconspicuous as he answered emails on a laptop, so we tried to be discreet. Still, I thought this was a fascinating interview, as we discussed his great working relationship with Marika Hackman, how the very quirky video for ‘Can’t Stop Now’ came about and how quickly his career has progressed since releasing his first single to the wild last year. Listen below.

Many thanks to Sivu for being the perfect interview subject and so cordial. We’ll see you at Liverpool Sound City!

 

SXSW 2014: the second half of Steve Lamacq’s BBC Introducing showcase at Latitude 30 – 13th March 2014

 
By on Tuesday, 25th March 2014 at 3:00 pm
 

A universal problem faced by all punters attending any festival are the dreaded schedule clashes that tear your insides apart. When I met Steve Lamacq Wednesday night at Parish Underground, he asked if I was going to be at his BBC Introducing night at the British Music Embassy at Latitude 30 on Thursday night. It was surely going to be a huge night for Lammo,as he had not put on a showcase at SXSW since 2008, when he brought a then unknown Florence and the Machine to Austin. I knew where my night was going to begin – we’d RSVPed to a Sofar Sounds: Austin secret show nearly 10 miles north out of town but knew nothing else – and I felt terrible telling him I could not be there for the start when THUMPERS were due on at 8. But I promised him I’d do my best to get there as quickly as I could once we were done with our previous engagement. And anyone who knows me well knows I will do everything in my power to keep a promise.

After the Sofar show, we drove back into town and I prayed to the parking karma gods that we would find a decent space not too far from all the downtown action. I guess they listened. As soon as we were parked, I left Carrie, who had a leisurely walk to Cheer Up Charlie’s, and practically sprinted all the way down to Latitude 30, going the long way round via Trinity and 5th Street to avoid the busiest section of 6th Street. (Yes, folks, after having done it 3 years running, SXSW does run like a military manoeuvre in my head.) I just missed the eccentric Cousin Marnie, who finished shortly before I arrived. But I was okay with that, because I was looking for someone else. Well, five other someone elses.

I don’t normally go up to people I don’t know and ask for help looking for someone else. But SXSW is a unique animal, am I right? And if you don’t ask, you don’t get. There were a couple of guys sat on the benches outside Latitude 30, and I went straight up to one of them and said, “excuse me, sorry to bother you, but I’m looking for the guys in Longfellow. Do you know where they are?”

He laughed. “I’m in Longfellow!”

Oops! Maybe it was divine intervention, but I found who I was looking for. One of Fierce Panda Records’ most recent acquisitions, Longfellow are a London band who everyone, including compere for the night Steve Lamacq, is expecting huge things from. As a fan of many of the bands on the Fierce Panda roster, when I received their first single ‘Siamese Lover’ in my email, I had to have a listen. I was instantly smitten. As the band were only playing this one BBC Introducing showcase and it was going to be their American premiere appearance, I knew I had to be there. I wished them good luck and we were going to catch up afterward, which we did for this post-gig interview in which they were humble, yet wide-eyed lads eager to start the next phase of their career.

I viewed their actual performance as a bit of a fairy tale, so I can only imagine how they must have felt. They don’t even have a debut album out yet, but Steve Lamacq took a chance on them and the other UK acts playing in the showcase that night. Because the BBC were both recording audio and video of the night, you can imagine the lighting was even more impeccable than on any of the other British Music Embassy nights. Nerves must have run rampant as this was the London band’s first experience with an American audience, but they played as if seasoned veterans as Austin – and later through BBC iPlayer – listened and watched on. In a particularly heartfelt moment, frontman Owen Lloyd – whose speaking voice some compare to Prince William’s – thanked the BBC and everyone who’d been supporting them up to this point, even going so far as to dedicate their next single ‘Hug – Kiss – Makeup’ . Bless. I’ve included the BBC’s professional video of the song below, because you’ll spy the camera of someone else who was videotaping the song as well. (Guess who.)

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3uZMNGw18M[/youtube]

There’s an anthemic quality to many of their songs, which explains why many people are already making their predictions that Longfellow is on track to become the next Coldplay. As the lights alternated from red to blue to purple from song to song, I couldn’t help thinking about that crazy wristband thing Chris Martin and co. did at stadium shows a couple years ago and wondered if this was a sign of things to come. However, the deepness and heightened emotions of Lloyd’s voice beats out Martin’s easily. ‘Waiting for Elvis’ was a highlight, as was an earlier song of theirs, ‘Gabrielle’, which will remind you of Chapel Club‘s debut album, except brighter when the song breaks open at the chorus. However, it was ‘Siamese Dream’ that swept me into a dancing mood, and I’m sure I amused more than a couple staring Americans.

That night, I also caught BBC Sound of 2014 nominees Royal Blood. But maybe ‘caught’ is the wrong word, as I could only stand four songs (I hung tight for behemoth ‘Little Monster’; see video below) before I had to give my ears a rest. I probably should have stood in the back instead of trying to be down the front in a desperate attempt to photograph Mike Kerr (vocals / bass) and Ben Thatcher (drums) but it was kind of pointless, because unlike Longfellow’s gorgeous multi-coloured light display, Royal Blood basically played in near darkness. Sorry John, I am sure you are disappointed, but I figured if I had stood there any longer, my ears would start bleeding.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ub6Q0DWg-g0[/youtube]

I met with Carrie later on, who was waiting for CYMBALS to bring the dance funk to the indoor stage at Cheer Up Charlie’s. But in a hilarious twist of fate, I accidentally got swept up in the wrong crowd, having been directed into the wrong queue and ended up knee deep with the photographers on a raised platform waiting for Future Islands on the outdoor stage instead. Seeing that the buzz surrounding Future Islands at this year’s SXSW was so massive, yet I didn’t bother to wait for them to start as I was concerned I’d be swallowed up by the crowd once they began playing, I beat a hasty retreat to be reunited with Carrie inside.

And if you were wondering about my keeping my promise to Lammo, I found him inside Latitude 30 before Longfellow took to the stage. I proudly showed him the photos I’d taken on my camera to show him why I wasn’t able to arrive to his showcase any earlier and who I’d gone to see. Upon seeing a band important to both of us, he smiled. When I told him that I was interviewing Longfellow after they played, he replied, “that’s great. They’ll be dead chuffed!” “Dead chuffed” is actually how I would describe myself upon meeting this band who I think has what it takes to be massive stars.

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

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