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Summer Camp / September and October 2015 UK Tour

 
By on Wednesday, 22nd July 2015 at 8:00 am
 

Header photo by Charlotte Rutherford

London indie pop duo Summer Camp will play a run of live dates this autumn in support of their third album ‘Bad Love’, which is out now on Moshi Moshi.  The husband and wife pair, comprising Elizabeth Sankey and Jeremy Warmsley, produced ‘Bad Love’ on their own, after having worked with outside producers on their first two LPs.  Says Warmsley, “self-producing means you get the most direct expression of what you’re trying to do. It’s not filtered through anyone else.”  

Tickets for the following shows are available now.  Just below the tour date listing, you can watch a live performance video of ‘Drive Past My House’, from the pair’s June show at the London Victoria. For past TGTF coverage of Summer Camp, click here.

Friday 25th September 2015 – Brighton Bleach
Sunday 27th September 2015 – Leeds Belgrave Music Hall
Monday 28th September 2015 – Manchester Night and Day Cafe
Tuesday 29th September 2015 – London Village Underground
Thursday 1st October 2015 – Sheffield Harley Hotel and Bar
Friday 2nd October 2015 – Edinburgh Sneaky Pete’s
Saturday 3rd October 2015 – Newcastle Cluny
Sunday 4th October 2015 – Nottingham Bodega Social Club

[youtube]https://youtu.be/m03_S3MKRb8[/youtube]

 

Video of the Moment #1861: Summer Camp

 
By on Tuesday, 21st July 2015 at 6:00 pm
 

Ever wondered what would happen if and when humans and zombies decided to go head to head at a roller derby? Well, ladies and gents, Summer Camp have the answer for you in their new video for ‘You’re Gone’. The feel good summer feel of the track hits the spot, even if zombies aren’t your thing. (They definitely aren’t mine, though I couldn’t help but laugh at this one.) Watch the new promo below.

‘You’re Gone’ figures as part of Summer Camp’s 2015 album ‘Bad Love’, released in May on Moshi Moshi Records and is available from all good music purveyors now.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jAWGGvx7Iaw[/youtube]

 

Deer Shed Festival 2014: Day 2 Roundup

 
By on Monday, 11th August 2014 at 2:00 pm
 

Camping with kids at festivals is rewarding and frustrating in equal measure. Despite running around all day, playing swingball in fits of glee, they rarely fall asleep anywhere near normal bedtime yet paradoxically wake at the crack of dawn, as the first glow of sunlight forces its way through increasingly stuffy canvas. Which would explain the weary expressions on the faces of parents in the queues for coffee and bacon sandwiches early Saturday morning at Deer Shed festival. Plenty simply hadn’t bothered to get dressed, waiting in line in pyjamas and Crocs for the calories and caffeine which would finally drag them into the realm of the waking.

As good a place as any to eat breakfast was the Big Top tent, with Paul Cookson and Stan Cullimore for company. Stan used to be in The Housemartins, so he can play the ukulele and now sings songs for kids rather than blather on about how good Hull is. Paul Cookson used to be a teacher, so knows how to handle a crowd of over-excited children, and trades in performance poetry when not accompanying Cullimore on the ukulele. He has one particularly memorable routine in which he impersonates his teenage daughter’s head-shaking, hand-waving putdowns: “Wha-eva, major loser!” Elsewhere, the Stan sings a song about the virtues or otherwise of his musical partner’s digestive system, which of course brings the house down. A great way to banish the cobwebs.

Leeds’ Post War Glamour Girls do a good job of convincing people to buy their début album ‘Pink Fur’. Its scuzzy, incessant grooves infected with gothic despair are ironically just the ticket to really launch into Saturday PM. The shadow of Nick Cave hangs heavy over them; indeed, the male-female interplay recalls Cave and Minogue at their most lugubrious. After all that, how bad can one’s life be in comparison? Dublin’s Raglans do exactly what you might expect of a few likely lads equipped with guitars from Ireland’s party city. Upbeat, jolly ditties, delivered with irrepressible enthusiasm. Their song entitled ‘White Lightning’ might raise queasy memories of last night’s cider-induced hangover, but apart from that, they deserve full marks for kicking the Main Stage into life.

With nothing of interest to follow on the Main Stage, it’s to the comedy tent to witness Wes Zaharuk (yet another name misspelled in the programme). His brand of shambolic, power tool-assisted slapstick comedy has the power to have an audience in tears of laughter in short order, and gives any manner of ideas for mayhem to errant toddlers. A whole toilet roll is unravelled in someone’s face using some sort of power blower, and a lucky lady gets to feed Wes a banana. From behind. Without looking. It’s unclear how he gets away with it, but give praise to the god of slapstick that he does.

Happyness are the perfect mid-afternoon tent band. Their chilled-out obscurantist rock proves how effective the power trio lineup can still be. Their songs have a deceptive superficial simplicity in which hides all manner of clever guitar work and surrealist lyrical content. ‘Refrigerate Her’, anyone? The irony of their name versus their faux-glum onstage banter doesn’t go unnoticed, either. With their début album now released, Happyness deserve increasing recognition for their West-Coast-by-way-of-South-London vibes – and they’re certainly headed in the right direction.

Unfortunately Catfish and the Bottlemen are indisposed, so Bleech play for the second time in 2 days. Which means that We Were Evergreen’s upcoming claim to Deer Shed fame – that they’d be the first act to play the main stage twice – is cruelly usurped by fate at the last possible moment. Which makes it even more inexplicable when the compere introduces “We Are Evergreen [sic], the first band ever to play the Main Stage twice!” just after Bleech had finished playing their second Main Stage set. Evergreen’s name had been misspelled throughout the catalogue and lanyard – one would imagine that a band that had played before would have better name recognition than the others, but apparently not. Anyway, a bit of a low point, credibility-wise.

What wasn’t a low point was We Were Evergreen’s actual set. Fortunately, the Parisian three-piece multi-instrumentalists can remember their own name and what to play. They’ve taken their time releasing their début album ‘Towards’, but the wait has been worth it. They’re complete antithesis of a guitar band: yes, they have a Telecaster and a ukulele, but they work in deference to the song, instead of the song being an incidental excuse for six-stringed excess. It’s impossible to overstate the songwriting efficiency that goes into a song like ‘False Start’: its funkiness is off the scale, there’s hooks galore, and the whole thing hangs in the air with a citric freshness of style for which merely being Gallic isn’t sufficient explanation. The closer ‘Belong’ has a climax of such theatrical intensity that it leaves the crowd in raptures of applause. There isn’t enough time in universe to get bored with it. We Were Evergreen deserve widespread acclaim, as do Deer Shed for hosting them twice – let’s hope they get their name right third time around.

Summer Camp play the “In the Dock” stage, which is a tent, but they surely would have worked just as well on the main stage, such is the power of their funkily intense pop music. Indeed, Summer Camp are perhaps the perfect intelligent pop band, with just the right blend of sugary melodies, acerbic observational lyrics, and a decent slug of wig-out when they’re really powering on. There’s some cuts from their recent ‘Beyond Clueless’ semi-soundtrack album, but the greatest acclaim is reserved for their back-catalogue classics – ‘Better Off Without You’ from ‘Welcome To Condale’ is received like an old friend. Elizabeth Sankey is a woodland diva, her tremulous soprano lending an air of dignity to the acerbic lyrics, whilst Jeremy Walmsley’s ’80s retro grooves ensure that any joints that may have become stiff in the evening breeze are well-loosened in anticipation of our headliner.

And so we come to Johnny Marr. In part 1 it was already established that Mr Marr is the most successful Deer Shed headliner ever, and outlined the reasons for it. Suffice to say that to these ears, seeing Marr live is actually superior to seeing the Smiths in their pomp: Marr’s voice is adequate but nothing spectacular, which leaves the music and songs space to breathe – the whole isn’t dominated by a preening diva flouncing around. Having said that, Marr is a surprisingly good mimic, his tone and inflection an impressive imitation of Morrissey’s, and indeed Neil Tennant’s for that matter. He played a decent mixture of solo songs, Smiths classics, one or two from Electronic, and a fine rendition of ‘I Fought The Law’. The enormous crowd gave a rapturous welcome, and even though this was surely a modest crowd by Marr standards, it was perhaps one of the most appreciative. It turns out an elder statesman headliner is perfect for the of-a-certain-age Deer Shed demographic. The mind boggles as to where this could lead – there’s no dearth of ex-singers or guitarists from respected bands which were active over the last two or three decades, any of which would be a perfect fit for Baldersby Park. More on this topic in part 3…

Keep it here on TGTF for the conclusion of Martin’s time at Deer Shed Festival 2014 coming soon.

 

Video of the Moment #1465: Summer Camp

 
By on Thursday, 6th March 2014 at 6:00 pm
 

Summer Camp‘s new video for ‘Crazy’ is just as advertised. See what we mean by watching it below. The song features on the band’s self-titled second album released in the autumn of last year, out now on Moshi Moshi.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73PGJX5XOHY[/youtube]

 

Video of the Moment #1354: Summer Camp

 
By on Thursday, 17th October 2013 at 6:00 pm
 

When it comes to music videos, I prefer quirky and unexpected. (Like, not another performance video or festival appearance. Please!) Enter Summer Camp‘s new one for ‘Two Chords’: the fluid circumstances of the end of the world play out in this send-up of a BBC News type-newsroom. Watch it below.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jc5PaUMGfTk[/youtube]

 

Video of the Moment #1294: Summer Camp

 
By on Friday, 16th August 2013 at 6:00 pm
 

Summer Camp‘s forthcoming single ‘Fresh’, out on the 2nd of September, has a funky ’70s dance groove. So the promo video is also appropriately low budget as they were back then too. The duo release their self-titled album, their second and the follow-up to 2011’s ‘Welcome to Condale’, on the 9th of September on Moshi Moshi.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wF7OC4h0jBE[/youtube]

 
 
 

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There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF was edited by Mary Chang, based in Washington, DC.

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