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Video of the Moment #2848: Suede

 
By on Wednesday, 6th June 2018 at 6:00 pm
 

Brett Anderson and Suede will be releasing their eighth studio album in September. ‘The Blue Hour’ is scheduled for release on the 21st of September on Rhino Records, the follow-up to the well-received 2016 ‘Night Thoughts’. To preview the upcoming LP, they have unveiled the first cut from it, ‘The Invisibles’. Coming in with orchestral might before Anderson’s emotional vocals, it’s a sign that their upcoming record will be a real beauty. The promo video isn’t very interesting: a non-binary person (?) is lip-syncing Anderson’s words while sat in a playground swing. Watch the video, or just play it in the background, really, below. To catch up with TGTF’s previous coverage on Suede, go here.

 

(6 Music Festival 2016 flavoured!) Video of the Moment #1992: Suede

 
By on Friday, 22nd January 2016 at 6:00 pm
 

It’s funny how you may be introduced to a band seemingly randomly, and then it turns out that said band becomes increasingly important to your existence as time goes on. It was years ago when I was in uni that a friend told me I should check out one of her favourite bands, Suede. Suede weren’t a band that was played on DC area radio in the ’90s (or if they were, I must have missed them), and it wasn’t until they’d broken up post-2002’s ‘A New Morning’ that I’d investigated their music with any gusto. Fast forward by a decade and these days, Suede is celebrating a revival in popularity, fuelled by the strength of their 2013 comeback album ‘Bloodsports’.

Today sees the UK release of ‘Night Thoughts’, and the latest video from Brett Anderson and co. Despite the return of Suede’s anthemic brand of jangly guitar rock, the promo that goes with ‘No Tomorrow’ shows the desperation of an obsessive-compulsive sufferer that ultimately leads to a sad, fatal end. I’m not sure if I am more upset that the band are using such a story to ‘sell’ their song, or if I’m glad that they’re showing what is all too real for the people of the world who suffer from anxiety and what they’ve done is a public service. Have a watch below and decide for yourself.

‘Night Thoughts’ is out today in the UK; its American release comes in a week, on the 29th of January. Suede have been announced as a Saturday headliner at the 6 Music Festival 2016 in Bristol in February; read more about the festival line-up in my preview of the 3-day event here.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZHQRz_15s3g[/youtube]

 

Update: 6 Music Festival 2016

 
By on Thursday, 21st January 2016 at 11:00 am
 

Following on from the previous announcement back in December that the event would be moving south in the new year, the full line-up for the 6 Music Festival 2016 (12-14 February) was announced on air Tuesday. Tickets are on sale this coming Monday, the 25th of January, at 10 AM, and below are the ‘greatest hits’ of sorts on all the details on the 3 nights of music in Bristol happening in just over 3 weeks’ time.

Previously revealed headliner Primal Scream will be playing Friday the 12th of February at Motion. Bobby Gillespie and co. will be joined by Yeasayer (check out their latest video for ‘I Am Chemistry’ below), Roots Manuva, Savages (who are releasing their newest album ‘Adore Life’ on Matador Records this Friday), !!!, BBC Introducing darlings from Stockport Blossoms and Sherwood & Pinch. Tickets to Motion for this evening will be £35 each (plus booking fee and postage). However, Friday’s festivities are just a mere aperitif to the rest of the exciting weekend in the trip-hop capital of the world.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7XzqCUbiPc4[/youtube]

For indie kids of all ages, Motion’s Saturday headliner Suede (pictured at top, with one of their newer singles ‘Outsiders’ below) are sure not to disappoint. With their newest album ‘Night Thoughts’ – the follow-up to their triumphant 2013 comeback ‘Bloodsports’ – out this Friday, they’re sure to wow with their legendary classics and soon to be classic tunes. Frankly, I’m just a little jealous I won’t be in Brizzle to see Brett Anderson holding court at “the UK’s most unique music venue” (their words, not mine). In this interview and live session Tuesday morning with 6 Music presenter Lauren Laverne, Anderson himself said he was super excited that Elena Tonra and Daughter, who have just released their own new album ‘Not to Disappear’ earlier this month, will be playing the same stage. Other artists on the Motion stage on Saturday night include 2015 Mercury Prize-nominated artist Roisin Murphy and C Duncan, the previously announced Tricky presenting material from his own new album ‘Skilled Mechanics’, Beta Band alum Steve Mason and Sunderland brother duo Field Music, also due to release a new album of their own, ‘Commontime’, at the start of February with Memphis Industries. Tickets to Motion on Saturday will be £35 each (plus booking fee and postage).

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AL15Nvlf7ZU[/youtube]

Saturday evening activity also kicks off at two more venues. The electronic grooves of Underworld and Roni Size & DJ Krust are the biggest names at the venerated Colston Hall, but they are supported by popular American rockers White Denim, the weird and wonderful Ezra Furman, youth favourite from Essex RAT BOY and Welsh songstress and ex-Pipettes Gwenno (introduced here), among others. The cavernous Academy will see American rock pioneer and Hüsker Dü founder Bob Mould supported by Mystery Jets (fresh off the release of their 5th album ‘Curve of the Earth’ last week) and Spanish girl group and flavour of the moment Hinds. A ticket to gain access to both Colston Hall and Academy on Saturday will £40 (plus booking fee and postage).

On Sunday at Motion, things turn back towards relatively newer indie (well, at least newer than Suede, ha), with Foals, Manchester’s Everything Everything, Beirut, Frank Turner and the Sleeping Souls, Polica, Kurt Vile and Mercury Prize-nominated experimental rock band The Invisible. Sunday night tickets to Motion will cost £35 (plus booking fee and postage).

Arguably the stronger night at Colston Hall, when Laura Marling, John Grant, 6 Music presenter and Elbow frontman Guy Garvey and Julia Holter will take the stage, along with many other acts. However, if you’re looking for more mainstream entertainment (to me, anyway) to round out your weekend in Bristol, the Academy will play host to the legendary Buzzcocks, the return and retooling of Bloc Party (seriously, have you heard ‘The Good News’ from their upcoming album ‘Hymns’? If not, hear it below) and the latest of young Liverpudian hopefuls ahead of their maiden voyage to SXSW in March, Hooton Tennis Club. A ticket to access both venues Sunday night will set you back £40 (plus booking fee and postage).

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ox68svCfm8k[/youtube]

And in case this post hasn’t been enough information overload for you, there’s still the line-up of the 6 Music Festival by Day – artists of spoken word, poetry and performance having their turn in the limelight – yet to be announced next Tuesday, the 26th of January. And for the first time, even sister station BBC Radio 4 is getting into the spirit this time round, with the Miles Jupp-hosted panel show The News Quiz landing in and being recorded in Bristol during the festival. So there’s really no excuse not to be excited by the goings-on down south. Don’t fret if you can’t travel to Bristol or don’t manage to score tickets after they’ve gone on sale. (In case you hadn’t heard what happened in the past 2 years in Manchester and Gateshead, the tickets will fly out the door as soon as they go on sale, so you’ll have to be quick.) The BBC will be bringing you coverage on 6 Music, BBC Red Button, and iPlayer, so they’ll have you covered.

Right. So I’m going to go back to my corner again and sob that I’m missing Suede live again…

 

Video of the Moment #1985: Suede

 
By on Wednesday, 13th January 2016 at 6:00 pm
 

There’s no getting round it, I am really, really excited about the new Suede album out next week. After the assertive comeback that was 2013’s ‘Bloodsports’, I think it’s pretty safe assumption that ‘Night Thoughts’, which will be out next week on Warner Records, will be another collection of corkers. ‘Outsiders’, which was unveiled in September of last year, is proof that they’re still able to churn out sweepingly beautiful anthems fit for the largest of music festivals.

Their latest reveal is for ‘Pale Thoughts’, which upon first listen is a much more heart-rending number, its tempo, Brett Anderson’s pained vocals and the forlorn guitar and synth lines all contributing to a feeling of solemnity that is oddly enjoyable, even if it seems to be borne from a kind of sad ennui. Watch the suitably visually reined-in video for the song below. The song is available at an instant download when you preorder ‘Night Thoughts’, out next Friday, the 22nd of January. Our entire archive on Suede on TGTF can be read through this link.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ir9RgLZuIfY[/youtube]

 

Kendal Calling 2014: Day 2 Roundup

 
By on Monday, 1st September 2014 at 2:00 pm
 

Martin’s Day 1 roundup from
Kendal Calling 2014 is here.

There’s no doubting the scale of The Ramona Flowers‘ ambition – theirs is all big reverb and hanging guitar notes, large-scale emoting and words like “bittersweet”. There’s a common comparison with U2, which is fair enough, but in comparison the Flowers seem a touch lightweight: at least U2 managed to write about politics before moving on to songs which can be played at weddings. ‘Brighter’ is a spacey affair which manages to tick all the boxes of swirly, effected guitar, emo-pained yet meaningless vocal meanderings and a stadium-friendly drum track. Does the world need another bunch of U2 wannabes? Probably not, but the experience is pretty exhilarating while it lasts. Steve Bird is a strong frontman – which basically means he knows how good he looks and plays up to it – and the rest of the band bang out the massive tunes with competence and enthusiasm. If, like Professor Peach, you “like ’em big”, then The Ramona Flowers are where it’s at.

Amber Run (another set, another meaningless two-word band name) belong to that most dreary of genres: Quiet-Loud-Folksy-Rock-With-Big-Crescendos-And-Wide-Eyed-Faux-Innocent-Vocals. Even if this was your very first introduction to the wonders of live rock music, you’d still be forgiven for thinking “is that really it?”. ‘Spark’ has a pointless refrain of “let the light in”, repeated ad nauseum – a defining feature of the QLFRWBCAWEFIV genre. ‘Noah’ has all the other tropes – mildly ironic orchestral baubles (in this case, xylophone) and vowels stretched to the very limits of decency. They’re not as irritating as Eliza and the Bear, although that’s like saying syphilis is preferable to AIDS. Both to be avoided as much as practically possible.

We Were Evergreen do their thing, which is to be very funky and French indeed. We’ve covered them before at Deer Shed Festival (read about this year’s appearance here), so there’s no need to go into detail about their virtues again here, except to say that TGTF had a chat with them afterwards, so watch this space for that.

Thank goodness for Findlay, who can be relied upon to be a proper rock star. There’s more attitude in her slight frame than any number of mopey, reverbed boy bands. ‘Your Sister’ is even more acerbic live, the minimal band (another example of the current superfluosity of bassists) rocking hard to an ancient blues riff over lyrics heavy with innuendo. She breaks out the overdrive microphone for ‘Greasy Love’, which is still a very naughty piece of music, its references to sweaty sex just about as raunchy as rock gets right now, and its music is as dirty as its lyrical content. A new track called ‘Stoned and Alone’ is unleashed with the order, “if you’ve got a spliff, smoke it now!” to the raised eyebrows of security staff; what a rebel. If there’s a girl doing better blues-rock than Findlay right now, call the Guinness Book of Records.

Catfish and the Bottlemen pack the Calling Out tent, punters squelching around in boggy puddles on its periphery, desperate to catch a glimpse of a band that are shaping up to be the next big thing in mainstream rock. The stars were all aligning for their Kendal performance – their album about to drop, it was frontman Van McCann’s birthday, and he’d just exclusively revealed to TGTF that he’d like CATB to be bigger than Oasis. Fair enough. And on the evidence of today, their trajectory is indeed inexorably upwards. Their songs are adventurous yet simple: big choruses, hooky melodies, modestly sweary of lyric yet innocent of eye. There’s nothing groundbreaking here, no novel song arrangements, no obscure instrumentation, just a wall of guitars and an endearing mixture of humility and genuine cool from McCann. Back in March last year, TGTF declared “anyone pondering the future of British guitar music should add Catfish and the Bottlemen to the list”. Come 2014, not only are they on the list, they’re fighting hard to be at the top. Care to bet against them?

With their run of festival performances this summer, Suede have pulled off one of the most profound comebacks in recent memory. Not only are they generally regarded as being, if not quite the inventors of Britpop, then certainly the trailblazers, they have managed to resurrect a career that was in danger of becoming a footnote in pop music history – a blazing start followed by a long tail of increasing mediocrity. No longer. Following their superb comeback 2013 album ‘Bloodsports’, Suede have crafted a live show utterly worthy of a headline slot at any event in the world. Even (whisper it…) Glastonbury. Mumford and Sons? Give me a break.

After an appropriately long wait, a shadowy figure emerged from the depths of the stage to the mournful piano strains of ‘The Next Life’, a hugely brave move in front of a Northern festival crowd known for its rowdy enthusiasm. Impressively, the crowd was hushed and reverent as Brett Anderson knelt, almost foetus-like, his cracked falsetto hypnotising them into silence. A beautiful moment of Kendal history. But in a blink it was gone, replaced by a romp through 20 years of Suede history. They played more than half their debut album but just a single track from opus ‘Dog Man Star’, perhaps reinforcing this author’s opinion that, good though ‘Dog Man Star’ is, it’s ‘Suede’ that is a true pop-rock masterpiece, with the perfect combination of punk, pomp and peroxide, and much more relevant in the live arena.

There’s four tracks from ‘Coming Up,’ demonstrating just how valuable the first Oakes-written Suede album is to their back catalogue. The move to single-word song titles (‘Filmstar’, ‘Lazy’, ‘Trash’) neatly summarises the fresh, efficient, to-the-point Suede 2.0 which emerged from the ashes of the ‘Dog Man Star’ sessions – such songs are remarkably fizzy, electronically-enhanced shocks of guitar pop that still sound fresh and vital today. We also get this writer’s favourite ever Suede song, ‘Killing of a Flash Boy’, never released on a non-compilation album, but a perennial live favourite, a dystopian singalong with a similarly worrying video.

There really isn’t a comparable story in pop to that of Richard Oakes. Plucked from nowhere as a schoolboy with a penchant for playing Suede songs in his bedroom, his mimicry of Bernard Butler was astonishing then, and his ability to write original guitar parts in the true Suede style is nothing short of a musical miracle even now. His recent portliness may not be true to the skinny Suede style of old (Anderson, however, remains as sticklike as ever), but is at least a visual reminder of the years that have passed since his joining. Despite what many longstanding fans may want to believe, Oakes has been in the band almost three times as long as his predecessor, and is the true sound of modern Suede.

The high-water mark for Britpop reunions is arguably Blur’s performance at Glastonbury in 2009, with perhaps an honourable mention for Pulp at Primavera in 2011. The difference here is that Suede aren’t just doing a one-off gig or two, this tour has been going for the best part of a year, featuring several festival appearances. This a proper career reboot, and with a new album slated for 2015, Suede are proving that they’re not happy simply with inventing Britpop. They want to reinvent it too.

More from Martin on Kendall Calling 2014 will be on TGTF soon.

 

Preview: Kendal Calling 2014

 
By on Friday, 21st March 2014 at 9:00 am
 

Think of an annual music festival that takes place in verdant countryside, set amongst rolling hills and centuries-old oak trees, featuring a populist main stage, a superbly-programmed and forward-looking new music stage, with jazz, world, dance, and even hidden woodland stages, an exclusive lakeside VIP performance area, and an arts strand curated by a bona fide rock star. Which was voted best medium-sized festival of 2013 (which TGTF can confirm from personal experience – it was). Sound good? You’re thinking of Kendal Calling.

With a heady mix of Mancunians, Glaswegians, and Geordies in the audience, the atmosphere at Kendal is rarely far from party central, but this year’s lineup is shaping up to be the finest yet seen at Lowther Deer Park. The big headline news is that London’s finest flop-haired, council-estate glamourists continue their epic rebirth with their first full summer of festival performances – the first of which is Kendal. Anyone who just a few years ago put money on Suede being the one of the hottest live properties of 2014 would be singing all the way to the bank right now, but it’s true: a new generation of so young beautiful ones are going to be driven star-crazy by the chemistry between us – Europe is our playground and we have the power to stay together. Or something.

Frank Turner (pictured at top) brings his Sleeping Souls to headline Saturday at the Calling Out stage – as Kendal’s most-requested artist, he’ll surely have no trouble in filling the tent, or struggle to exhort a capacious crowd to sing along to his punky, Americana-influenced ditties. A slice of true American chaos arrives in the shape of Reel Big Fish, replete with parping horn section, lots of jumping around, and huge helpings of tongue-in-cheek-and-down-throat ska-punk. Here’s hoping for their cover of A-ha’s ‘Take On Me’ – surely the cue for the Kendal crowd to go pogoing mental.

Those for whom festivals simply aren’t fulfilling experiences without not one but two helpings of Johnny Borrell need look no further. He’s there with old band Razorlight, or what’s left of it, presumably with a “performance as history lesson” ethos, given the band haven’t released a record since 2008’s ‘Slipway Fires’. Perhaps this will please the of-a-certain-age Saturday afternoon main stage crowd, but overall seems a Noughties revival too far. Potentially far more interesting is Borrell’s new project, Zazou: heavy with sultry saxophone and avant-garde arrangements, this is the sound of a former rock star going just that little bit off the rails. ‘Cyrano Masochiste’, anyone? Well worth popping one’s head in for.

Everyone’s favourite postmodern diva Findlay will be there, the ever-underrated Athlete will no doubt remind everyone why they were the sound of 2003 (because they’re very good), and Happy Mondays will no doubt manage that combination of inspired madness and total car-crash that they’ve been known for, well, pretty much forever. Other highlights: Breton will be defining the actual sound of 2014, TGTF favourites Catfish and the Bottlemen will be again proving why they are the future of British pop-rock, and the North-East of England is strongly represented by the beautiful, fragile pastoralism of Lanterns on the Lake, and the beautiful ginger hair of the identical, and identically noisy twins of Gallery Circus, the North-East’s answer to Drenge. Except better. Oh, and Goldie’s DJing.

If you’re within walking, cycling, or hitching distance of Westmorland, Kendal is a summer essential, like a rain cape and warm lager. Except it never rains at Kendal, and the beer is always cold. Honest.

Also headlining the festival will be Brett Anderson and Suede. For more information on Kendal Calling including finding out how to book tickets, visit their official Web site.

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

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