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SXSW 2017: Wednesday night’s marathon, with stops at Lambert’s, Clive Bar, St. David’s Bethell Hall and Elysium – 15th March 2017

 
By on Monday, 10th April 2017 at 2:00 pm
 

Wednesday night at SXSW 2017 was always going to be a test of my speed and endurance, with a veritable smorgasbord of choices on the schedule at venues spread widely across downtown Austin. When I nailed down my own agenda for the evening, I was a tiny bit cranky at the prospect of so much walking, but in the end, the shows I saw were entirely worth the athletic effort. (To give you an idea of how much walking was involved, my smartwatch recorded over 20,000 total steps and 10.5 miles’ distance on Wednesday!)

Allison Pierce internal

After a brief dinner break, I ventured west of Congress Avenue to Lambert’s, where the SESAC showcase was being held. I would have happily stayed for the entire evening, as the SESAC docket included several favourites of mine, including Ciaran Lavery and Silences. However, the crazy Wednesday night schedule didn’t allow me to stop that long, and I only stayed long enough to satisfy my curiosity about singer/songwriter Allison Pierce. Formerly of sister-act The Pierces, Allison Pierce has stepped out on her own as a solo artist, and from the sound of her set at Lambert’s, she’s gone country. Perhaps that shouldn’t come as a surprise, given her Alabama upbringing, but this was definitely more of a streamlined, pure country sound than the psychedelic folk I last heard from The Pierces. Pierce followed her SXSW appearance with a run of live dates supporting The Wind and the Wave, and her debut album ‘Year of the Rabbit’ is due out on the 5th of May.

Magic Giant internal 1

My next stop was on the other side of downtown Austin, at Rainey Street’s Clive Bar, which was hosting the Showtime ‘I’m Dying Up Here’ launch party. Mary had warned me that the Showtime event would be a madhouse, and when I arrived at the Clive Bar after walking all the way across downtown from Lambert’s, I was disheartened to find a long queue outside. Surprisingly enough, the line moved quickly, and I was able to secure a spot close to the stage for Los Angeles indie rockers Magic Giant, with whom I’d had this lively interview earlier in the day.

Magic Giant internal 2

As advertised in the interview, Magic Giant’s live show exuded a brilliant energy and included a cacophony of creatively-devised sounds. Despite my prime spot at the front of the stage, I found it difficult to take photos, as none of the three band members (lead vocalist Austin Bisnow, multi-instrumentalist Zambricki Li, guitarist Brian “Zang” Zaghi) were in one position for very long. The momentum of the music and the quick rotation of instruments kept them in constant motion, even finding them down in the middle of the crowd at one point for what might be called a low-level acoustic mosh.

Magic Giant internal 3

Magic Giant’s incredibly organic indie folk debut album ‘In the Wind’ is due out in May, and the band is planning to be on tour for the rest of this year. Keep an eye on the Tour section of their official Web site for upcoming dates, and be sure not to miss them if they pass through your area.

My mood improved considerably by Magic Giant’s vibrant set, I left the Clive Bar and embarked on the long uphill walk to St. David’s Episcopal Church. Though I’d seen several shows at the church over the past three years at SXSW, I hadn’t yet been inside Bethell Hall, and I was initially taken aback by the very minimal set up of the stark room.

Ryan Vail internal

The stage area, such as it was, was positioned in the front of the room, with a grand piano and an electronic keyboard, along with a soundboard and a projector screen for visual effects. Despite some technical difficulty in the initial setup, this was perhaps a more natural situation for Ryan Vail, whom I’d seen earlier in the week at the Output Belfast Boat Party. Vail took advantage of the lovely grand piano in Bethell Hall to play tracks from his piano-oriented debut LP ‘For Every Silence’, which is described on Soundcloud as “the story of a piano that was made in England in 1927, shipped to Derry in Northern Ireland, cherished by Ryan’s wife’s family and restored for use on a stunning debut album, where the warm, well-loved character of the instrument takes centre stage.” I was pleased to see a new facet of Vail’s talent, namely his genuine skill as a composer, shine through in a different context than what I’d previously heard.

My last stop of the evening was at Austin dance club Elysium for the end of the KCRW showcase. Earlier bands on KCRW’s lineup had included Gabriel Garzón-Montano, Aquilo (see Mary’s past coverage of her Wednesday night covering the two of them here), and Mondo Cozmo, who I’d already seen earlier in the afternoon. By the time I arrived at Elysium, there was an impressive queue for hotly-tipped Aussie band Middle Kids, and I wasn’t sure I’d get in to see them, but once again good fortune prevailed.

Middle Kids internal

It’s always a pleasant surprise when a heavily-hyped band actually lives up to its billing, and such was the case with Middle Kids. Their indie rock sound leans just enough toward the pop side to be catchy, but aside from being eminently listenable, it’s also charmingly quirky. Lead singer Hannah Joy doesn’t go out of her way to do anything weird just for the sake of being noticed, which is refreshing in a time when female frontwomen are definitely feeling the pressure to stand out in the growing crowd. (I did, however, take notice of Joy’s Hendrix-style left-handed guitar technique.)

Cherry Glazerr internal

Los Angeles alt-rockers Cherry Glazerr immediately positioned themselves on the opposite end of that continuum when their lead singer Clementine Creevy did a spidery commando crawl onto the stage and announced her presence by bellowing “Hey, assholes!” into the microphone. This was an immediate turn-off for me, but many of the punters in the crowd responded positively, both to her deliberately obnoxious demeanor and to Cherry Glazerr’s raucous, rebellious grunge. Judging by the reaction to the creepy Kewpie-style doll attached to Sasami Ashworth’s keyboard, I’d say their track ‘Nurse Ratched’ is well on its way to being a sleeper summer hit.

SOHN internal

After overcoming the seemingly standard technical issues faced by electronic artists at SXSW, London-based SOHN closed out the night at Elysium with a delirious 1 AM set that swayed between sensual and sweaty in a room drenched in dim red lighting. I always feel bad for artists who get stuck in the final time slot after a big-name act, when the room invariably empties, and SOHN was no exception. But in a proper club atmosphere, this would clearly have been a better-received set, and I’ll wager that fans of electro artists like Jack Garratt (who faced a similar situation at SXSW 2015) will catch onto SOHN in the very near future.

 

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2017: London electronic artists and DJs showcasing at this year’s SXSW

 
By on Tuesday, 21st February 2017 at 11:00 am
 

As you might imagine, London leads the charge with the largest number of artists one city in the UK is sending to SXSW 2017. In this post, we introduce you to 11 acts from London Town specialising in electronic music and DJaying. The summaries of acts below were written by Mary Chang, Rebecca Clayton, Steven Loftin and David Wriglesworth. Please note: all information we bring you about SXSW 2017 is to the best of our knowledge when it posts and artists and bands scheduled to appear may be subject to change. To learn when your favourite artist is playing in Austin, we recommend you first consult the official SXSW schedule, then stop by the artist’s Facebook and official Web site for details of any non-official SXSW appearances.

Anna Meredith
Composing isn’t usually the most orthodox starting point for someone wanting to venture into a career in pop, but that’s exactly where Anna Meredith started her foray into music, and to great success. Before releasing her debut album, Meredith spent time as composer in residence with the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, composed for the Proms, and gained a Masters at the Royal College of Music, amongst many other accolades.

In 2016, Meredith released her debut album ‘Varmints’. Her music draws on her classical history, combing grand electronic sounds with synth strings. Meredith’s LP is as unusual as it is impressive, and creates an immersive musical experience for the listener. ‘Nautilus’ is a must listen. (Rebecca Clayton)

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vajhs2wBeCU[/youtube]

Aquilo
Deeply emotional and airy synthpop, fit for a darkened, heartbroken night: that’s Aquilo (pictured at top). They don’t just have their heart on their sleeve, they’re grabbing it and shoving it in your face. Starting off with a couple of Soundcloud singles in 2013 that were picked up by various outlets, they then went on to play only their fourth show ever at Glastonbury 2014. Not a bad start for the duo, not bad at all. 2017 sees them finally releasing their debut album ‘Silhouettes’ and an opportunity to make waves at SXSW. (Steven Loftin)

DJ Yoda
Duncan Beiny, better known as DJ Yoda, is a multi-award-winning hip-hop DJ and producer, who has worked with pretty much everyone, from classical composers to neuroscientists. In recent years, DJ Yoda was asked by Dr Dre to record a guest mix on his inaugural Beats 1 show for Apple Music, and he was one of the artists to perform at Banksy’s pop-up bemusement park Dismaland.

DJ Yoda pioneers new forms of audiovisual entertainment, chopping and splicing classic movies with the hands-in-the-air clubbing vibe. In 2014, DJ Yoda was commissioned to rescore classic films as part of BFI’s sonic cinema event, and he produced a mash-up of BBC Radio 4’s entire station, remixing The Archers, the shipping forecast, John Humphries and more.

In 2017, DJ Yoda is taking his ever-evolving DJ sets, which take in a diverse array of styles, genres, decades and continents, all over the world, with shows at SXSW, Snowbombing (Austria) and Hideout Festival (Croatia). (David Wriglesworth)

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfslnlx_aSE[/youtube]

Draper
Producer James Draper has been around a while: he’s already released a whole host of EPs, including his eighth, ‘Luminous’ (out now on M:UK), which Steven reviewed for us on TGTF last month. Lest you think Draper is a one-trick pony, think again. Not only is the Kent professional highly sought out producer, he has collaborated with and written pop bangers for big names like Ellie Goulding, Twin Atlantic and Rita Ora. It won’t be his first rodeo – Draper has been to SXSW before – so perhaps past experience will make his performances stand out from all the newbies? (Mary Chang)

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTR9fi0sjS0[/youtube]

Fifi Rong
Fifi Rong is London-based, but lived in China until she was 16 when she was enrolled in a boarding school in Bristol. She self-released her debut album ‘Wrong’ in 2013, and since then has worked with the likes of Skepta, featuring on his 2016 album ‘Konnichiwa’. In 2016, she released an EP, ‘Forbidden Desire’, which she funded through Pledgemusic.

Fifi Rong’s voice is husky and distinctive, and her tracks involve beautiful and unearthly electronic sounds, which focus on love and relationships. (Rebecca Clayton)

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBCYdRdphWM[/youtube]

Jamie Isaac
Croydon-born and bred, Jamie Isaac released his debut album ‘Couch Baby’ last year, a following two EPs released back in 2013 and 2014. Isaac attended BRIT School along with contemporary and sometime collaborator King Krule, but rather than following in the footsteps of the likes of Adele and Jessie J, Isaac is carving out a much different path.

Isaac focuses on pared-back, dreamy electronic rhythms and a gentle tempo that is both captivating and seriously chilled. ‘Couch Baby’ is an album that can only be described as easy listening, the type of album that you can put on in the background and relax to. (Rebecca Clayton)

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTfYmEwefkY[/youtube]

Reeps One
Of the many young artists coming out to SXSW 2017, few can say they’ve already been nominated for an award, let alone won one. Harry Yeff, better known under his stage name Reeps One, is thus special because he’s a prize-winning beatboxer.

Even though the only instrument he uses is his own voice box, I’ve put him under the electronic category because SXSW has and I would venture to say they consider his voice as peerless an instrument like a synthesiser. Lest you think that his musical style is reminiscent of those spitting dudes in the ‘hood back in the ‘80s, I’ve included a more melodic example of his beatboxing below. (Mary Chang)

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDXvMPWfPyo[/youtube]

Rude Kid
London-based producer and DJ Rude Kid is heavily entrenched in the grime scene, being able to cite the likes of Skepta, Wiley and Shy FX amongst his collaborators. Passionate about music, Rude Kid, who at one time was signed to Sony Music, released and experimental EP ‘One Week’ in 2012 which he created in just a week, before sharing as a free download.

He’s released a fair bit of music in his career so far, and spent much of 2016 showing his prowess as a DJ, and even started hosting his own grime radio show on Kiss FM. Rude Kid’s music features darker elements of grime, when compared to AJ Tracey mentioned in our review of the pop acts from London headed to SXSW. His 2015 EP ‘653’ in collaboration with Ghetts features the popular ‘One Take’, which has racked up millions of listens on Spotify. (Rebecca Clayton)

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SY8zrzB45X8[/youtube]

SOHN
Christopher Taylor is the enigmatic producer and electronic singer/songwriter, who I suspected could be a hooded, yet groovy polar bear live in concert 3 years ago in DC. A lot had changed for Taylor following his well-received debut album ‘Tremors’ in 2014, and the extensive touring to promote the LP took its toll on him as well. Decamping temporarily to a house in sleepy Northern California to write and record follow-up ‘Rennen’ did him good: read my album review from last month for more details. How will a producer who favours dark clubs fare in sunny Austin? We’ll have to wait to find out. (Mary Chang)

SWEAT
Electronic in all the right places and all the right ways, SWEAT are one of the brightest stars in the upcoming UK music scene right now. Filled with crisp beats and youthful romantic tales, they’re onto a real winner. ‘Stay’, for example, features a beautiful composition that trundles along, disappears and then returns with even more grace and melody. (Steven Loftin)

Tender
Life-long friends Dan Cobb and James Cullen comprise electronic duo Tender. From the basement of their North London home, they’ve produced three EPs, ‘Armour’, ‘Tender EP II’ and ‘Tender EP III’. To coincide with the duo signing with Brooklyn-based label Partisan Records in July 2016, Tender released ‘Outside’, the first single to be taken from their third EP. Since its release, the single has been streamed over 4,000,000 times on Spotify.

For the year ahead, Tender look set to embark on a number of live dates, including shows at SXSW and a headline show at Oslo Hackney in London, before finishing off and releasing their debut album. (David Wriglesworth) [As of 21/2, Tender are no longer listed on the SXSW Music Festival schedule.]

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iPdJM_7CgU8[/youtube]

Youngr
Dario Darnell is no stranger to the electronic scene, having previously been in Picture Book with his brother Lorne Ashley. While Picture Book appears to be on hiatus at the moment, Darnell has struck out on his own as a one man multi-instrumentalist under the moniker Youngr. You could say that his career in music was pretty much assured: his father is none other than August Darnell, aka Kid Creole of Kid Creole and the Coconuts’ fame.

Darnell has taken a page from his father in writing and performing catchy pop tunes with a soulful r&b vocal, though in his case, he also takes advantage of a full synth setup and plenty of electronics in the absence of a backing band. He’s in the middle of a European tour at the moment and will be touring North America around his week in Austin. (Mary Chang)

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDRdikMNwi8[/youtube]

 

(SXSW 2017 flavoured!) Video of the Moment #2261: SOHN

 
By on Thursday, 12th January 2017 at 6:00 pm
 

Christopher Taylor, better known as the shadowy, hooded, electronically gifted producer creature SOHN, releases his second album tomorrow. ‘Rennen’ will be available from 4AD from all good physical and online shops in 6 hours for the Brits and the Irish, and a bit longer for us here in the States. You can read my review of the highly enjoyable LP back here. The album opens with ‘Hard Liquor’, which now has its own music video.

The promo takes full advantage of the juxtaposition of light and dark, black and white, and in a beautifully artful way. The video also plays to the darkness of alcohol dependency and depression. Watch it below. I’m very excited to get a chance to see Taylor play live again after more than 2 long years in Austin in March, as he’s scheduled to perform at this year’s SXSW 2017. To read more of TGTF’s coverage of SOHN, peruse the archive through here.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m0uxavVdhco[/youtube]

 

(SXSW 2017 flavoured!) Album Review: SOHN – Rennen

 
By on Tuesday, 10th January 2017 at 12:00 pm
 

Header photo by Phil Knott

SOHN Rennen album coverAhead of his scheduled appearance at SXSW 2017, electronic musician and producer SOHN ushers in the new year with his newest album. Though the London-born Christopher Taylor has spent most of his creative time since 2012 living in Vienna, he temporarily relocated to a house in sleepy Northern California to work on this second outing, ‘Rennen’. Interestingly, the topics he explores on this effort aren’t entirely escapist; instead, he faces his personal life and international politics head on. And in an unusual move, Taylor decided to take a less is more approach on this SOHN album, limiting himself to three elements going into each track.

Meaning the action of running in German, the title seems to sum up well his escape to America following the whirlwind of critical attention paid to him and the exhausting touring he undertook to promote his celebrated 2014 debut LP ‘Tremors’. “I was running nonstop that whole time,” he says. “It was this incredible blur of seeing the whole world all in one go. I was going from experience to experience to experience always saying yes, and that’s just an incredible thing to put yourself through as a human.”

Given the popularity of ‘Tremors’, which contained the robust singles ‘Bloodflows’ and ‘Artifice’, any follow-up would be difficult. But the time away seems to have done SOHN’s new music a world of good. The influence of his co-writing and production work for other, more pop-centric artists, from Rihanna to Disclosure, have seeped into ‘Rennen’. This provides surprisingly wonderful moments on the album that might otherwise not happened. Changes in Taylor’s personal life since his debut – including falling in love, getting married and learning he will become a father – also affected the content of the new album, providing a unique window into the artist’s psyche during this snapshot in time.

‘Rennen’ begins with the bluesy ‘Hard Liquor’, a darkly appealing track with a clear r&b bent, quickly followed by two already revealed songs. The repeated lyrics in ‘Conrad’ – “I can feel it coming, we can never go back” – could sum up well our collective sorrows of 2016, but Taylor meant to point specifically to Europe’s uncertain future and shaky political climate, no doubt to include the passage of Brexit. The use of empty bottles and kitchen utensils for percussion adds to the scrappy desperate feel despite the song’s undeniable pop sensibility. ‘Signal’ debuted with a music video directed by and starring Hollywood starlet Milla Jovavich. The single itself sees Taylor return to what we formerly knew as the SOHN sound: less pop and more experimental, with intriguing synth note and vocal compression and a bare yet oddly soulful drumbeat. ‘Proof’ is another great example of this.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3fQOlOwnaN8[/youtube]

The rest of SOHN’s ‘Rennen’ will delight electro heads but will also fascinate open-minded pop fans with plenty of interesting bits in a post-Bowie/Prince world. The synth chords on ‘Dead Wrong’ are borderline ominous, but accompanied by Taylor’s r&b vocal and rhythm, you can imagine it’d be something Michael Jackson might have come up with if he was still alive today. On ‘Primary’, Taylor revisits politics, specifically the start of the 2016 U.S. presidential election campaign: “nobody seems able to really change / I can’t believe we’re not better / I thought we were past this”. The bright, percussion-led ‘Falling’ mirrors the intoxicating adrenalin rush of love with its upbeat tempo. Is it too much to wish for him to finally record in daylight and be totally happy on album #3? Ha. On the starkly bare title track ‘Rennen’, Taylor’s double-tracked vocals and at times falsetto are beautiful. Maybe we should leave him to follow his muse.

An electronic producer has, pretty much, infinite options at his fingertips when he sets his mind on making music. In challenging himself to do more with less, Taylor proves without a doubt through his vocal and songwriting abilities on ‘Rennen’ that he shines in a relatively minimalist environment. An incredible achievement.

9/10

‘Rennen’, the second album from SOHN, will be out this Friday, the 13th of January 2017, on 4AD. Prior to his scheduled appearance at SXSW 2017, he will embark on a European tour in early February, culminating in a show at London Electric Brixton on the 1st of March. For more coverage of SOHN on TGTF, go here.

 

Live Review: SOHN with Wet at U Street Music Hall, Washington DC – 1st November 2014

 
By on Monday, 3rd November 2014 at 2:00 pm
 

Saturday night in Washington. Usually a good shout but seeing that it was the first true cold snap we’d had this second half of the year (hello, first true frost warning of winter), I wondered if that would diminish the turnout at U Street Music Hall. This show had been sold out long ago but I was unimpressed by the queue when I strolled up 10 minutes before doors and found myself about 20th in line. Then the wind started howling and I decided anyone already in line was serious about the bill.

I exchanged pleasantries with the teenage couple in front of me in the queue when they asked me for the set times. The girl then went on to explain that support act Wet “only have about five songs”. Not terribly auspicious. Still, I went in with the hope that I’d find something about them to like. Here’s the thing: electronic music isn’t known to be forgiving to a singer. You’re either a strong singer whose voice holds up to the electronics and rises above it emphatically (say Andy McCluskey of OMD, Theo Hutchcraft of Hurts), or you risk getting lost in the shuffle. And sometimes the latter is fine, if that’s the mood you’re going for.

Kelly Zutrau doesn’t look the part of electronic band frontwoman seductress; maybe I’ve been spoiled at this venue by the regality of Valerie “Tei Shi” Teicher back in July supporting Glass Animals? But laid back Zutrau in a t-shirt and jeans seems to fit in with the overall philosophy of Wet: yes, the vocals are dreamy and the electronics with r&b inflection are a sight to behold live, but really, this young band are not one to take themselves too seriously. I mean, take a look at some of their song titles: ‘You’re the Best’, ‘Don’t Wanna Be Your Girl’ (promo video below), ‘No Lie’. They’re not going to win any songwriting awards anytime soon. On paper, the sweetness of Zutrau’s voice (probably better suited for a dream pop act) shouldn’t work with the backing thrown at her but somehow it works. Then again, I still don’t understand the appeal and meteoric rise of CHVRCHES, their former touring mates in the States, so what do I know? Turns out quite a few punters were there for Wet and not for SOHN, which was a surprise to me, but I guess 13,000 followers on Facebook don’t lie.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lNuttRinIA[/youtube]

A man who dresses nightly like the dark version of The Flying Nun shouldn’t be a popular electronic artist. Yet somehow Christopher Taylor, the London-born, Vienna-dwelling producer who goes by the stage name of SOHN, can pull it off. His debut album for 4AD that was released in the spring, ‘Tremors’, has already made impressive waves around the world. I’ve considered that the all black outfit he favours is like Daft Punk’s spacesuits, designed to minimise the effect of his appearance (as a very tall English chap with a hipster beard and unlikely to hurt a fly) that might otherwise detract from the complex nature of the electronic music he makes. Thankfully, the thick fog that envelopes the stage for a good third of the night eventually lifts, but I couldn’t help but think that any number of animals from colder climes could be hiding under that misty shroud playing music, and we wouldn’t know any better:

However, the decision to shroud both himself, his two live band members and the stage turns out to be a very good idea for most of the set. Except for a few obviously pissed audience members who are throwing their bodies around for the entire show, for until the last quarter of the hour or so he plays, due to the lack of distraction on stage, the vibe in the club is one of reverence, with men and women singing along softly word for word to the songs. While I was surprised by the minimalism, it allowed Taylor’s soulful voice to shine on ‘Bloodflows’ and ‘Veto’, and the falsetto he brings out for title track ‘Tremors’ was met with rapturous crowd response. Humourously, an attempt to signal his sound guy, stationed all the way at the far end of the floor, to lower a “woo” frequency only caused the audience to get more riled up, mistaking his hand gestures for a request for them to be louder and make more noise. Oops.

But this is all part of SOHN’s appeal. Taylor might be dressed in a hood, but one suspects that he’s a really down-to-earth kind of guy, feeling truly blessed his music has reached this many people, and in such a strong and positive way. In an avuncular, Mister Rogers manner, he actually asks the audience with a smile, “ready?”, before launching into megahit ‘Artifice’. Bless. Rhetorical question. The club lit up as Taylor threw his own body into the performance, which is no mean feat considering the man was sat in front of his table of electronics all night. Followed by ‘Lights’, with its heartfelt refrain of “blood, sweat and tears won’t retrieve it / you just have to wait to receive it”, the progression was peerless.

In the middle of the show, a fire alarm triggered by the aforementioned fog refused to shut off; instead of stopping the set, Taylor and his bandmates embraced it, slowing down an entire number to incorporate it into the song. “At least it’s on the beat!” he commented with a grin, before continuing. But it was ‘The Wheel’, the sole encore, that truly brought the house down. “The very last breath” SOHN had to give us Saturday, like the other songs that came before, was brilliant. Technically gifted and with a beautiful voice, I hope Taylor continues to share his music with us for a long time to come.

 

Live Gig Video: SOHN performs four tracks live for Seattle radio station KEXP

 
By on Wednesday, 18th June 2014 at 4:00 pm
 

I admit it. Ever since I heard ‘Artifice’ by SOHN, I’ve been addicted to the man’s music. Live, the Vienna-based English electronic musician is pretty much a one-man band, with synths, samplers and sequencers at the ready to pair beautifully with his soulful vocals. Unfortunately, I was in England when Christopher Taylor made his first visit to DC and I will just have to wait until winter before he returns. He’ll be playing a couple dates in the UK in September too.

In the meantime, we’ve got this amazing live performance of the always hooded Taylor, plus a bit of a chat with Cheryl Waters, all filmed at famed Seattle radio station KEXP. In it, he performs ‘Veto’, ‘Tempest’, ‘Artifice’ and ‘The Wheel’. The songs appear on his debut album ‘Tremors’, which came out in April on 4AD. Watch the magic unfold below.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OjmE5I1HhYk[/youtube]

 
 
 

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There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF was edited by Mary Chang, based in Washington, DC.

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