Looking for previews and reviews of SXSW 2019? Right this way.

SXSW 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | Live at Leeds 2016 | 2015 | 2014
Sound City 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | Great Escape 2018 | 2015 | 2013 | 2012

Don't forget to like There Goes the Fear on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

Video of the Moment #2923: Savoir Adore

 
By on Wednesday, 13th February 2019 at 6:00 pm
 

Savoir Adore will be releasing their fourth album in April. ‘Full Bloom’, scheduled for release in early April, is the second half of two albums, following the unveiling of ‘First Bloom’ last autumn. A preview of the upcoming album is, confusingly, a single itself called ‘Bloom’. The song’s accompanying promo was filmed in Boston in a small club called Jacques Cabaret. It follows the transformation of a young man into a drag queen, taking the song’s title literally. Watch the video for ‘Bloom’ below. Stay tuned for ‘Full Bloom’ on the 5th of April on Nettwerk Music Group. Interested in reading all of our past coverage on Savoir Adore on TGTF? Come this way.

 

Video of the Moment #2894: Savoir Adore

 
By on Wednesday, 12th September 2018 at 6:00 pm
 

As much as I kvetch and complain about the heat of a DC summer, I don’t know if I can say goodbye to summer just yet. Pulling on a jumper or blazer for work this week has given me quite a bittersweet feeling. The new Savoir Adore video for ‘When the Summer Ends’ is, visually, full of reminders of what makes summer great. Long summer drives, noshing on popcorn with late night movies, fun times in the pool with your friends: what more could you ask for? ‘When the Summer Ends’ in a enjoyable, poppy synth number feeling as easy and breezy as the kind of summer day you wish could last forever. The single will appear on the first half of a two-part album, ‘First Bloom’, which will be available from Nettwerk Music Group on the 19th of October. Catch all of the Savoir Adore goodness (er, articles on them) here on TGTF through this link.

 

Live Review: Everything Everything with Savoir Adore at Black Cat, Washington, DC – 14th October 2017

 
By on Monday, 16th October 2017 at 2:00 pm
 

When several lovely things happen at once, it seems less a coincidence and more like the stars aligning thanks to fate. Saturday night definitely felt like one of those times. The ever eclectic Everything Everything returned for a third time to Washington, DC, as part of their campaign to tour current album for RCA, ‘A Fever Dream’. (Unveiled in August, you can read my review from back then through this link.) Amazingly, they were supported Savoir Adore, by an American synthpop band I’ve followed and loved for years. In short, this show was a most excellent double-header, like a fantasy come to life.

My most recent experience seeing Brooklyn’s Savoir Adore live was at SXSW 2016, at the Neon Gold showcase on a rainy Friday night. Despite the delay and trying conditions, Savoir Adore’s catchy, synth-led tunes shone through the darkness. I found out during a conversation after this show at the Black Cat that the SXSW 2016 appearance was one of co-lead singer Lauren Zettler’s first shows with the band following Deidre Muro’s departure in 2014. Talk about baptism by fire! Fast forward a year and a half later, and Savoir Adore now have a third album to show off, summer 2016’s ‘The Love That Remains’, out now on Nettwork Records. It’s another great collection of sometimes dreamy, sometimes funky synthpop, made more special by the strength of Zettler and group founder Paul Hammer’s beautifully complementary voices.

Savoir Adore October 2017 Washington 2

With three albums under their belt, they have quite a bit of material to choose from for live performances. The uber lovely ‘Dreamers’ and the bass thumping ‘Regalia’ recalled the glory of the 2013 ‘Our Nature’ era. Newer songs ‘Savages’ and ‘Crowded Streets’ are a nice step in their evolution, the latter with an added nice, anthemic, The Naked and the Famous-esque oomph to their production. They closed their set with single ‘Giants’, an uplifting number about getting back on your feet after every of life’s stumbles. Savoir Adore are one of the best band examples of how to do life-affirming, feel good synthpop right. Leaving everyone in the Black Cat pumped up for the main event, I only wished they could have played longer.

For sure, I chose the right place to stand for this show. Stage right, I was surrounded by a nice mix of guys and girls, all massive fans excited for the show and ranging from near to full breathlessness in their devotion to Everything Everything. One girl with her sister warned us she might faint if they played ‘Distant Past’. (Spoiler: they did. I can report that thankfully, no fainting occurred.) At a venue like the Black Cat, there is a special kind of intimacy and interaction that the stars onstage can have with their audience. Except for title track ‘A Fever Dream’ that saw Jonathan Higgs sat down at the piano for a brief, quiet moment, the onslaught of the Everything Everything sound that we have come to know, all the weird and the wonderful words and music they have gifted to us, never let up.


Everything Everything October 2017 Washington 1

It’s testament to their continued inventiveness and pop songwriting approach that over a decade and four albums that they have maintained a cult status in the upper echelons of indie rock cool. They are revered and envied widely in this business, and for good reason. The first tracks for their first and latest albums, the herky-jerky ‘MY KZ, UR BF’ and ‘The Night of the Long Knives’, respectively, can stand beside in a live set, proof they have kept pushing the envelope with their sound. And intelligent fans respond to that. When Higgs pointed his mike towards the Black Cat audience on ‘Spring/Sun/Winter/Dread’ and ‘Can’t Do’ (see them perform the song appearing at the 10-year anniversary of BBC Introducing below), they answered with near-deafening shouts back to him.

If you ever get caught up in the booming sing-alongs to ‘Desire’, ‘Cough Cough’, ‘Regret’ and ‘Kemosabe’, join in, you’ll never regret it. To be surrounded by smiling, happy people who all know exactly when to sing the flute-like, high-pitched “do-do-DO-do” parts of ‘Get to Heaven’ is a moment I won’t soon forget. Clear highlights from ‘A Fever Dream’ included the brilliantly executed bursts of guitar on ‘Run the Numbers’, followed by the noodley freneticism of ‘Ivory Tower’ in the encore. The audience’s demand for “Ten more songs!” wasn’t honoured, true, but when a call like that comes through and so emphatically, you know the band must be doing a lot of things so right.

Everything Everything October 2017 Washington 2

Some of Everything Everything’s upcoming live appearances include closing out Liverpool Music Week 2017 on the 4th of November and then heading to Australia in late December into early January, performing at their summer festivals and headline shows at Sydney Metro and Thornbury Croxton Ballroom. They also have an UK/Irish tour for late February into March 2018. Check out their full list of live dates on their Facebook, and enjoy the entirety of our extensive archive on Everything Everything through here.

After the cut: Everything Everything’s set list.
Continue reading Live Review: Everything Everything with Savoir Adore at Black Cat, Washington, DC – 14th October 2017

 

SXSW 2016: evening rain with Neon Gold and with Clash and PPL at the British Music Embassy (Friday night, part 1) – 18th March 2016

 
By on Friday, 8th April 2016 at 4:30 pm
 

At my first SX in 2012, the only things me and my British and Irish friends were fending off were minor: sweat and sunburns. Rain seems to have only been a recent pest to SXSW and Friday night, thunder and lightning again threatened SXSW 2016’s showcases. When Carrie and I set out for our evening plans, rain fell hard and lightning streaked through the sky. Not eager to put punters into danger, outdoor, open air venues like Stubb’s and the pop-up McDonald’s Loft on E. 3rd Street chose to temporarily close their spaces or cancel their shows altogether. I crossed out my previous plans to see Everything Everything and DMA’s (at Stubb’s) and Banners (at the McDonald’s Loft) once I learned from Twitter that the venues closed, then reopened to allow bands to only perform shortened sets.

I began my night at our ol’ standby, the British Music Embassy, where Clash Magazine and UK music rights and licensing agency PPL were hosting an evening showcase. Throwing Shade was the first act on their bill. London-based producer Nabihah Iqbal has her own show on NTS Radio every fortnight and puts on a hip-hop night with fellow Londoner Felicita. However, she’s also released plenty of her own music, her use of beats suggested by many to represent the next emerging wave of London electronic music.

Throwing Shade at the Clash and PPL showcase at the British Music Embassy, Friday at SXSW 2016

Prior to SXSW, her latest release the first week of March was the ‘House of Silk’ EP on Ninja Tune, filled with phat beats and glittery synths. Throwing Shade offers a unique perspective on life, too, because she has to be the only London producer (or one of the very few) with a master’s in philosophy. She chose to start with a spoken word piece with very little instrumental backing (that I could detect, anyway), essentially freestyling to begin her set before she truly got going. With my love of electronic, I expected to have loved Throwing Shades’ beats, but for some reason I wasn’t impressed. Perhaps we can blame the weather for keeping people set wherever they were until the storm blew over and that’s why the venue wasn’t full, but this kind of music feeds off of audience response and energy. I would imagine my feelings towards her music would have different if I’d seen her in London in a rammed venue full of her adoring fans.

Back out into the rain, my intention was to rejoin Carrie at Empire Control Room on E. 7th Street, where both the Control Room and main Empire Garage venues were to play host to two Neon Gold Records showcases. However, the Empire was another venue that wasn’t taking any chances with their visitors’ safety, herding everyone who had planned to see bands on the only partially covered Garage stage outside and forcing them inside. That meant that the Control Room reached maximum capacity before it should have, and those of us who were stuck outside were looking at an empty Garage stage until stage management decided it was safe enough for a band to take the stage.

After a significant delay, Brooklyn’s Savoir Adore took to the stage, with their updated lineup of Lauren Zettler having replaced Deirdre Muro on vocals and synths. After a period of darkness, the Garage stage’s light show was impressive but epileptic seizure-inducing, distracting me from Savoir Adore’s upbeat synthpop. However, they had plenty of fans down the front who were going mental over them, well pleased they’d finally been given the green light to start playing and reveling in the overenthusiastic light show. To each their own, I guess!

Savoir Adore at Neon Gold showcase at Empire Garage, Friday at SXSW 2016

We’d only previously been inside Empire Control Room during daylight hours, so I was eager to see how the vibe felt after the sun had set. Declan McKenna was the first name on the indoor bill, and I’ll Carrie tell you what she thought of him, as I’d seen him play already and to a room of new converts at Huw Stephens / PRS for Music showcase Tuesday night to officially begin the British Music Embassy’s week at SXSW 2016. He was followed by Will Joseph Cook, who Consequence of Sound calls an “English wunderkind”. The young Tunbridge Wells native and his band have a perfectly serviceable, if not entirely inspiring pop/rock hybrid sound that top 40 fans will bop their heads along to.

Stay tuned for part 2 of my Friday night soon on TGTF.

Will Joseph Cook at the Neon Gold showcase at Empire Control Room, Friday at SXSW 2016

 

Top Gigs of 2013: Editor’s Picks

 
By on Tuesday, 17th December 2013 at 11:00 am
 

2013 did not disappoint to deliver another year of brilliant live performances for me here in America and in Britain. Which shows will I remember the most from 20-13? (I wrote it out that way, because I was told this last time in England that me pronouncing it that way makes it obvious I am an American. Do you reckon that’s true? I’m trying, folks, I’m trying, but as the majority of you know, I am American, born and bred!) Read on about the most exciting shows I’ve been to this year…

5. the 1975 at U Street Music Hall (20th June 2013) – I’ve been lucky enough to have seen the 1975 5 times this year, with 3 of those times in DC, and unusually, the one show that sticks out in my mind among all others is not their largest show in DC, nor their smallest, but the one in between.

The energy at U Street Music Hall, coupled with the screaming fans down the front, made it clear I was witnessing history. So what if “she’s got a boyfriend anyway”? We’ll be singing and bopping to the music like we don’t care, that’s what.

The 1975 Washington June 2013 1

4. Savoir Adore at DC9 (25th September 2013) – DC9 doesn’t have a great reputation for sound quality, but on this Wednesday night, all the stars aligned for a near perfect sounding show, highlighting the shiny, glittery ambiance that Savoir Adore brings to their shows.

Deidre Muro and Paul Hammer now have an impressive back catalogue to draw from, and this was just a wonderful gig to showcase their music, with punters having such a good time dancing to their tunes.

Savoir Adore Washington 2013 live 2

3. the Crookes at Sheffield Shakespeare (19th May 2013) – as the American editor of a UK-centric music site, all too often I’m left banging my head against a table or a wall when I come to the disappointing conclusion that I can’t attend a show I really want to be at. (Maybe one day when I have my own private plane…)

While the travel to Sheff was a pain in the arse – I must have taken the slowest Sunday train known to man from St. Pancras to the North East – and I’d not slept the night before, as John and I had been in Brighton all weekend to cover the Great Escape, it was all worth it for this chance to see one of my favourite bands in a teeny tiny gig in their hometown. As soon as I’d arrived at the place, I knew I’d made the right decision, having been greeted with the singing talents of a good friend wafting ‘Dance in Colour’ out of the top windows of the pub. You can’t make this stuff up, folks. Read my review for further musings.

2. OMD at Gateshead Sage (13th May 2013) – where do you go to see a favourite Northern band when possible? The North, of course. Martin had alerted me ahead of time that the Sage was quite a posh place and to expect people to be dressed fancier than I was used to seeing in clubs.

Hate people talking on their phones at gigs? The Sage has high-tech mobile phone blocking technology. The beautifully lit, swiveling panels suspended in the air above us and the band were awe-inspiring, as were Andy McCluskey’s seemingly inexhaustible singing and dad-dancing talents. ‘Electricity’? Why, yes.

OMD Gateshead live 1

1. Little Comets at the Hamilton (13th August 2013) – for the longest time, it seemed all my music friends had seen this Geordie band live and I hadn’t; further, so many of the bands I was personally friends with either had toured with them or had become friends with them after being impressed by their live show at a festival.

Well, it took 4 long years but I finally got to see Little Comets live, and I’m pleased to report they were well worth the wait. The dinner theatre-style setup of the Hamilton means at most shows, punters will remain sat at their tables, chewing on their tapas. Not this night: with fans shrieking and letting out catcalls of delight, stomping to their favourite songs and singing along word for word to tracks like ‘Isles’, it was definitely a moment in time I will never forget. More of this, please!

Little Comets Washington 2

Honourable mentions:

Franz Ferdinand at Strathmore Hall (17th October 2013) – I was under the distinct impression I would never see Franz Ferdinand live, unless maybe I was lucky enough to catch them at a festival. It had been 7 years since they’d played in DC. Great show punctuated with Alex Kapranos’ Olympic-effort leaps and bounds, and I have to say, you haven’t lived until you’ve been sat next to Nick McCarthy’s extended family at a show. Just saying.

Kodaline at Jammin’ Java (13th October 2013) – it must be nice to be on your first headline tour of North America and arrive in a city to find out you’ve sold out your gig there. I’ve seen quite a few post-gig fan queues in my day, but this one for Kodaline stretched to about forever. We hung around for over an hour and a half, watching the band say hello, sign autographs and take photos with each and every fan that wanted to meet them. If only all bands were as considerate.

the Static Jacks at DC9 (2nd October 2013) – this guys just get better and better every time I see them. They managed to turn a humdrum Wednesday night in Washington into a disco, with appreciative fans cutting a rug to their music. Doesn’t really get any better than that.

Villagers at Rock ‘n’ Roll Hotel (13th June 2013) – this was the first time I’d see the Villagers full band setup, having only seen Conor J. O’Brien solo in 2010. If you had reservations that ‘Becoming a Jackal’ was a whimper-y kind of record and you weren’t sold on their new direction in ‘{Awayland}’, go see them live now and watch them rock out.

the Joy Formidable at 9:30 Club (21st April 2013) – I prefer to see this Welsh band in smaller, dingier confines because I think their music suits that kind of environment better, but still, this was an amazing show. Hard to believe the first time I saw them was in November 2010, barely filling half of Black Cat Backstage’s capacity of 200.

After the cut: the full list of all the gigs, in reverse chronological order, that I’ve been to in 2013. The runner-up gigs are also marked.

Continue reading Top Gigs of 2013: Editor’s Picks

 

Live Review: Savoir Adore with Miracles of Modern Science and French Horn Rebellion at DC9, Washington DC – 25th September 2013

 
By on Friday, 27th September 2013 at 2:00 pm
 

Though the Sister Sledge disco anthem ‘We Are Family’ comes from the ’70s, you could argue a real 21st century version of it unfolded before our very eyes Tuesday night at DC9. Dance / dream pop duo Savoir Adore, who had just returned from a whistle stop tour of South America and their largest headline show ever just 3 nights before at the Music Hall of Williamsburg, returned to DC for the first time since October, when they played the much more difficult to get to Rock ‘n’ Roll Hotel. With them were fellow Brooklyn bands and literally family, at least for Savoir’s Deidre Muro and French Horn Rebellion’s David Perlick-Molinari and the band he has with his brother Robert, as well as Princeton University-borne band Miracles of Modern Science, whose Australian violinist explained they’ve all now decamped to Brooklyn, which is how they know the other two bands.

Miracles of Modern Science Washington live

And yes, I said violinist. Probably the most famous classical string instrument-playing musicians out there today are Patrick Wolf and the Airborne Toxic Event‘s Anna Bulbrook, but the aforementioned and oddly named (to me as a trained scientist) Miracles of Modern Science are about to turn the world on its ear. You don’t find too many bands with a violin, mandolin, and double bass this side of the music world post-Bill Black in his Elvis days. From my internet research, I learned that the group decided to blend indie with classical string quartet, which doesn’t sound like a winning combination on paper.

They have an EP out this year, ‘MEEMS’, and one of the tracks on there, ‘The Singularity’, is absolutely brilliant. An organised chaos of frenetic strings with interesting, science-related lyrics? I can get on board with that. You’d think with a cheesy band name like theirs, their songs would be uptight. Not at all. Toe-tapping and eclectic, they’ve managed to sound different, fresh and inspired. With Mumford and Sons going on hiatus, it just could be this band’s time to shine.

French Horn Rebellion Washington live

If you’ve never seen French Horn Rebellion live – and I hadn’t until Tuesday night, but former contributor Coco had in Hong Kong 2 years ago – you would never know that the French horn actually is a prominent part of their live set, and not just in gimmicky name. I really can’t remember if the mirrorballs in DC9 have always been there but if they have been and I just didn’t notice, it’s because it’s only on a night like this that they would be spinning and shining in all their glory. The brothers Perlick-Molinari put on a dance party like no other, and their live band brought the funk and warmed up the crowd for their brothers/sister in arms.

French Horn Rebellion with Deidre Muro Washington live

New song ‘California’, along with older favourites, had punters cutting a rug and at times, some bumping into me while they were doing it. I’m fine with that: I love people who are dancing, having a good time and being polite to other patrons. A surprising yet entirely giddy cover version of the Human League’s classic hit ‘Don’t You Want Me, Baby’, complete with a star turn on female vocals from Muro, went down an absolute treat. Their short set closed with ‘Love with Dangerous’, with a super sick bass line and pulse-tickling percussion, and allowed them to end on a high note.

Savoir Adore Washington 2013 live 2

After leaving New York on Saturday afternoon and feeling pretty bummed I was missing Savoir Adore, to be surrounded by all their local friends no doubt, in Williamsburg, I felt slightly better that I could catch them in my hometown instead. I’m not sure if it was sheer luck, or Savoir Adore’s equipment, but at times in the past, the sound at DC9 hasn’t been great. However, I am happy to report that on Tuesday night, Savoir sounded huge; I even told Paul Hammer that they sounded loads better than they did at RNR last year, even without lighting that was colour-coordinated by track. (Well, instead they and their live band decided to all dress in white, which looked smart and sharp.) I was expecting the set to heavily feature tracks from latest album ‘Our Nature’, but that didn’t really happen. While we were given a super energetic version of ‘Regalia’, ‘Dreamers’ and ‘Loveliest Creature’, the latter with Muro sporting a tinsel-laden cape, I was shocked that my favourite ‘Empire of Light’ was left out.

Savoir Adore Washington 2013 live

Instead, the band chose to delve further back into Hammer and Muro’s back catalogue and to songs I imagine they haven’t played all that often lately. One such decision was to include ‘Transylvanian Candy Patrol’ from their 2009 album ‘In the Wooded Forest’; with its softer moments punctuated by sections of just plain, all out rocking out, if you thought Savoir Adore was merely a dream pop band, you’d be sorely mistaken. That said, the breathy beauty that is ‘Sea of Gold’, which sounds like it could feature on an advert of any number of gorgeous island escapes, is a testament of where the duo were when ‘Our Nature’ came out. Where will they be for album #4? I can’t wait to find out. And since they live in New York and relatively close to us, I am sure they will be back to play for us soon.

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF was edited by Mary Chang, based in Washington, DC.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

RSS Feed   RSS Feed  

Learn More About Us

Privacy Policy