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TGTF Guide to SXSW 2018: this year’s conference programming in the Music Industry track

 
By on Wednesday, 21st February 2018 at 11:00 am
 

Header photo of Shakey Graves by Greg Giannukos

SXSW Music Conference programming under the umbrella of the Music Industry track is intended to guide artists and other industry professionals through the promises and potential pitfalls of everyday business in the music world. This year’s Music Industry programming includes panel sessions on a variety of current trends and topics of interest, as well as touching base with the basics.

Music Industry Culture
Carrying on from programming at SXSW 2016 and SXSW 2017, this year’s music conference continues its meta-examination of music industry culture, starting with a question that digs down to the very root of the investigation. On Wednesday the 14th of March, a panel session titled ‘Is Culture Change in the Music Industry Possible?’ will consider “whether it is possible for such a complex, fragmented [industry] to develop a common culture, what an ideal music industry culture might look like, and most importantly, how we actually get there.”

A continued emphasis on feminism in the music industry manifests in several conference sessions, including ‘Women in Music: Break the Ceiling + Bridge the Gap’ on the 14th of March and ‘Sexual Misconduct in the Music Industry’ the following day. The former panel promises to “explore the challenges women face in negotiating and share tactics to become a better negotiator” as well as assessing “the current status of the gender and wage gaps and the impact these barriers have had on women in our industry.” The latter panel will specifically address sexual misconduct, with focus on “the pervasiveness of sexual misconduct and how this aggression affects the psyche of women working in music in regards to performance, promotions, equal pay and influence.”

Music Curation and Experience
‘Barriers to Innovation for New Music Experiences’ will begin the week on the 13th of March with a panel set to examine “current hurdles and roadblocks that face those building a new generation of music services and experiences”. In the spirit of an evolving music experience, a historical session titled ‘Curation, Collaboration & Community’ on the 14th of March “will outline the journey of Tileyard Studios and the revolutionary transformation of a dilapidated area of London to one of the most exciting music creators’ hubs in the world.”

Conference programming also reflects a continued interest in the ways modern listeners prefer to consume music, with topics ranging from terrestrial radio to digital playlist collaboration on the table for discussion. On one end of that spectrum, ‘Measuring What Matters in a Playlist-First World’ on the 14th of March will dive into the data on digital playlists with discussion about “how to understand and measure them” as well as what those measurements might reveal about “music consumption, marketing, and music creation”. At the other extreme, a session on the 16th of March called ‘Is This the Golden Age of Alternative Radio?’ finds that medium inexplicably “on the rise” and will examine how best to take advantage of its current popularity.

On the related topic of music curation and discovery, Pitchfork founder and editor-in-chief Ryan Schreiber will lead a panel on the 15th of March titled ‘Why Music Journalism Matters in the Streaming Era’, with discussion on “navigating new challenges, providing crucial context, and how to evolve as [music streaming] services threaten to push into the realm of content creation.” The following afternoon, ‘Stop the Scroll: Creative Strategy in Social Media’ will help online curators “learn how to make a creatively driven social strategy . . . [and] deliver campaigns that keep fans coming back for more.”

Artist Issues
Professional issues facing artists in the current music business atmosphere are, as always, at the center of this year’s Music Industry track. Early in the week on the 14th of March, ‘Beyond the Band: Shakey Graves’ will take a look at the “many different elements that comprise a successful career as a musician” in the context of Do617’s Beyond the Band partnership with Berklee College of Music and LATW Group. The featured artist on the panel is Shakey Graves’ Alejandro Rose-Garcia, pictured at top.

In the same vein of cooperation and collaboration, ‘The Band is With Me: The Art of Team Building’ on the 16th of March will talk about how to assemble a strong team of professionals behind a career artist, in the areas of “artist service platforms, PR, development/management, and marketing/touring.” More specifically, ‘What Does an Artist Manager Do and How to Get One’ on the 17th of March will find artist managers sharing “practical, concrete steps every artist can take to go about obtaining management” and ways for “up and coming managers . . . to help grow their clients’ careers exponentially.”

Financial issues are always at the forefront of an artists’ career, and there are many scheduled conference sessions surrounding the delicate topic of money. On the 15th of March ‘New Ways to Finance a Music Career’ will discuss artists’ “options [and] tools to self-finance their career outside of the traditional label/publisher system.” On the 16th of March, ‘We Will Rock You: Make a Big Noise with the Brands’ promises helpful tips on “how you can win that brand and help the brand tell a story [that will] come alive with your music.” In the same time slot, ‘Paid in Full: Fixing Music Rights for Artists’ covers the difficulties of “connecting billions of global streams to the right parties” and “how smart minds are working to find solutions.”

Mentor Sessions
A large number of Mentor Sessions with music industry professionals are listed under the Music Industry track. These sessions require RSVP, and access will only be available to badge types listed as having Primary Access. Featured mentors include record label executives, public relations professionals, artist development managers, marketing specialists and attorneys.

As with all of the SXSW 2018 events we cover here at TGTF, music conference programming is subject to change. We suggest you consult the official SXSW 2018 schedule for the latest additions and editions.

 

Preview: Liverpool Sound City 2018

 
By on Monday, 19th February 2018 at 11:00 am
 

The newest installment of Liverpool Sound City will see the Merseyside event split the difference between its physically isolating docklands location with open air stages of the last 3 years and its spiritual origins as a city festival. The festivities of Sound City 2018 will move to multiple venues in the Baltic Triangle, an excellent decision in my opinion, and will take place the first May bank holiday, 5-6 May. A few weeks ago, the festival announced their lineup, but I’ve only now gotten around to taking a closer look at all the names. It’s pretty awe-inspiring.

Aussie alt-rockers DMA’s (pictured at top), who wowed me and many other punters at SXSW 2016, are no strangers to UK festivals, having already made the rounds the last 2 years. They’ll have travelled a long way for the honour of headlining Saturday night, so I’m expecting them to pull out all the stops. The Sydneysiders are gearing up to release new album ‘For Now’ on the 27th of April, before appearing in Liverpool. Birmingham’s Peace, Sunday night’s headline act, will be celebrating the release of new album ‘Kindness is the New Rock and Roll’ 2 days prior on Ignition Records. Check out the video for ‘From Under Liquid Glass’ from the LP below; the newest album taster from the band, ‘Power’, can be streamed on Spotify. For mainstream rock fans, their performance will no doubt be a wonderful way to cap off a bank holiday weekend. Incidentally, in case you missed it, Peace have also been announced as co-headliner at Live at Leeds 2018 the day before. They’re on equal footing at that event in North Yorkshire with Liverpool’s own Circa Waves, who are oddly and conspicuously missing from the Sound City lineup.

Upon closer inspection of the rest of the festival poster, many names will be familiar to you TGTF readers. IDLES (England), Picture This (Ireland), Billie Marten (England), Airways (England), The Academic (Ireland) and Indoor Pets (England; formerly Get Inuit) have all had their own closeups at past SXSWs. Dermot Kennedy (Ireland), Sam Fender (England), Husky Loops (London via Bologna), Otzeki (England), The RPMs (England) and Superorganism (their members hailing from several different European countries) will have their chance to shine in Austin next month ahead of appearing at this year’s Sound City. Other amazing acts scheduled to appear include The Orielles, who we discovered at the 2013 edition of Sound City and who just released their debut album ‘Silver Dollar Moment’ last Friday on Heavenly Recordings; Baxter Dury; Black Honey; JAWS; Matt Maltese and Paris Youth Foundation.

Of course, there are so many other bands performing at the event and even more yet to be announced. Now that Sound City have smartly reconsidered their format, turning it back into a club-centric festival, the 2018 edition is the perfect opportunity to visit one of the best music cities in the UK and discover some new favourites. Single day tickets to Liverpool Sound City are available for £29.50. For £55, you can snag a weekend ticket. Get your official tickets through this link. To read all of our coverage on Liverpool Sound City from past years, go here.

 

Preview: Live at Leeds 2018

 
By on Tuesday, 19th December 2017 at 11:00 am
 

While on my recent birthday trip to blighty, I visited Leeds and remembered with great fondness my first visit to the city. It was for the 2015 edition of Live at Leeds. Now that after 3 years Liverpool Sound City appears to be in perpetuity as a docklands-focussed event no longer centred on its lovely city, it falls to Live at Leeds to provide the sole Northern festival to celebrate its city’s many music venues.

Next year’s event will take place on Saturday, the 5th of May during the first bank holiday of the month. Here we are, having not even reached Christmas yet, and the event organisers have already announced a wonderful slew of tantalising artists scheduled to appear. Birmingham psych rockers Peace occupy real estate at the top of the event bill, alongside Liverpool’s Circa Waves. The Horrors, who returned this year with ‘V’ (reviewed by Steven here), are also scheduled to appear, as are British Sea Power and LAL 2016 alums Anteros, Blaenavon and Spring King.

Festivals are a great time for musicians to road test new material or continue a campaign in support of a new album. Nick J.D. Hodgson will sound familiar: formerly the drummer and primary songwriter of Kaiser Chiefs, he’ll be performing in his hometown prior to the release of his first solo album. FatCat Records signee KNIGHTSTOWN released his self-titled album this autumn and will no doubt be wowing audience with his atmospheric electronic sounds. Aussie surfer poppers Hockey Dad will be returning to blighty for this 1-day festival: they’ll be releasing a new album, ‘Blend Inn’, in February.

This is just a small smattering of artists who will be performing at this exciting event across Leeds city centre next year. Early bird admission tickets to Live at Leeds 2018 are now sold out, but general admission (£39.60) and VIP (£55.00) tickets are still available. For more information about Live at Leeds 2018, visit the event’s official Web site.

 

TGTF X BIGSOUND 2017 Playlist: Editor Mary’s best bets (O-Y)

 
By on Thursday, 31st August 2017 at 11:00 am
 

In this final installment of the TGTF X BIGSOUND 2017 playlist, I introduce you to the remaining 12 of 24 acts I’ve chosen as best bets for this year’s BIGSOUND. Australia’s premier emerging music extravaganza will take place in Brisbane’s Fortitude Valley 5-8 September next month. Last Thursday, I presented the first 12 acts from Ariela Jacobs to Mammals, and you can read my thoughts on each of them through this link. And the week prior on 17 August, I set my focus on Brisbane’s local talent being given a shout to BIGSOUND 2017. Some of the acts you will read about today were part of the previously posted Brisbane artist playlist. You can read about those artists in the associated feature and listen to them back here.

I’m looking at my coming over for my first BIGSOUND as TGTF’s opportunity to truly get stuck into the Australian music scene, and I’m very excited. If there are any Aussies out there who have further recommendations on who I should see, Tweet me @theprintedword, and I’ll see what I can do about adding the band to my schedule. A playlist with all 24 acts I recommend as best bets at BIGSOUND 2017 is at the bottom of this post.

OKBADLANDS (Brisbane; pop / rock)
Kate Gurren and Sally Latter are Queensland duo OKBADLANDS. Upon hearing them, you will be surprised of their backgrounds: Gurren’s university study of jazz and Latter’s more conventional bass work in indie bands. These gal pals create an interesting blend of not quite rock, not quite pop, and yet a still engaging mélange of the two that draws you in.

Osaka Punch (Brisbane; funk / metal)
What’s great about a music festival that puts homegrown talent on show like BIGSOUND is that you’re going to get some wild card acts that put traditional genres on their proverbial heads. Osaka Punch aren’t your ordinary rock band. Sure, they can wail on guitars and hit the skins like the best of them, but they also can be as funky as hell. Can metal and funk fuse successfully? Yes. You can also tell that they’re having a whale of a time with music, which is what we need in these cartoony times.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3K9E3avjWQ[/youtube]

Pandamic (Rockhampton; pop / rock)
With the introduction of synths everywhere, even infiltrating what seems to be most of the Aussie music scene, a band like Pandamic is a breath of fresh air. They’re showing how it can be done with a more traditional rock band setup, wearing plaid and making it sound easy. What they’ve managed to do has already caught the eyes and ears of fellow Queenslanders and well known established group Dune Rats, who signed Pandamic to their Ratbag Records label.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5azpjwl5jiM[/youtube]

Polographia (? ; dance / electronic)
Time to take things back to the dance floor. I’m not sure where Polographia are from, but I do know it’s the brainchild of two people, Daniel and Moktar, who are “Tryin’ to keep it real in a digital world.” This is the kind of music current era Phoenix wish they could make.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DMbhQuNSsvY[/youtube]

Resin Moon (Alice Springs; dream pop / electronic)
So you’re telling me you need something much more chill, and the award-winning Dave Crowe’s electronic project Resin Moon is, then, perfect for you. Having dream pop qualities that keep the electronic elements of the music from getting too intellectual (you know what I mean) makes Crowe’s music beautifully accessible to all.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wlQfX44tpBU[/youtube]

Scalphunter (Perth; hard rock)
But some of you prefer your rock edgy and hard. Fast-paced, in your face rock from a Best Live Act nominee in the debut National Live Music Awards last year, Scalphunter are a no-brainer if you’re looking for your brain to get pummeled a bit at BIGSOUND this year.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=russvSdlbd0[/youtube]

Slow Dancer (Fremantle; pop / rock)
I have included Simon Okley’s solo project here because he’s unlike anyone else showcasing in Brisbane next month. Instead of trying to run with what’s hip and hot at the moment like everyone else, Okley hasn’t forgotten where we came from. He embraces what made rock music in its earliest days: great songwriting driven by melodic guitar, exemplified by Fleetwood Mac and Neil Young, two acts his sound has been compared to.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ghnjAV1GZdk[/youtube]

Thandi Phoenix (Sydney; pop / r&b)
Smoky, soulful pop: that’s Sydney’s Thandi Phoenix. What keeps her head and shoulders with the rest of her contemporaries is her integration of wholly modern beats with her r&b vocals and her willingness to collaborate with others, which has become more important these days in a truly global music industry. Watch out, Alicia Keys. Thandi’s about to shove you over and off your piano bench.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LCUZfmF8ko4[/youtube]

The Beautiful Monument (Melbourne; punk rock)
Sure, there’s plenty of single girls with guitars singing about heartbreak, and others singing other people’s pop songs in high pitches. But when was the last time you heard an arse-kicking, all-girl group? Probably PINS, right? Fearless and ready to rock just as hard as the guys, if not harder, I couldn’t be prouder as a female music editor that a group like theirs exists.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PW29qdUxIE[/youtube]

WAAX (Brisbane; rock / punk / indie)
With a sneer and ‘tude, the angst game of WAAX is strong. They’re fronted by female vocalist Marie DeVita, so the comparisons to Siouxsie and the Banshees and Yeah Yeah Yeahs seem too obvious. Compelling vocals with equally compelling rock: brilliant.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7n4ZJidgaXg[/youtube]

Willaris K. (NSW; electronic / experimental)
With Will Doyle ditching his East India Youth moniker, I’ve been wondering who will pick up the experimental, yet emotional electronic mantle. Jack McAllister is going to take a good shot at this. There’ s a lot one can do with synthesisers, and McAllister does a good job of weaving ambient soundscapes full of texture and points of interest. And like any electronic producer worth his salt, he’s an excellent DJ too, so I expect he’ll be entertaining the masses in Brisbane.

Yoste (Brisbane; dance / electronic)
It seems rather appropriate to end my best bets list with an artist I think should serve as the most effective musical ambassador for his country, like Daithi is for Ireland. Kurt Sines has named Bon Iver, James Blake and Jonsi as big influences on his art, and it’s not hard to imagine his music soundtracking tourism adverts showcasing the beauty of Australia and its people. Fresh and light on its feet, Yoste’s music is equally chill and gorgeous.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOBkeMDStDw[/youtube]

 

TGTF X BIGSOUND 2017 Playlist: Editor Mary’s best bets (A-M)

 
By on Thursday, 24th August 2017 at 11:00 am
 

Regular readers of TGTF are familiar with our ‘best bets’ lists that we post here before most music festivals. I think it makes the astounding long list of acts scheduled to perform at an event a bit more manageable for you. Then, the onus is on us to listen to everyone and make our personal recommendations for must-see acts at the festival. In the case of BIGSOUND 2017, set to take place the first full week of September in the Fortitude Valley of Brisbane, Australia, their list of performers is over 150 acts long.

Compared to preparation for UK, Irish, and American events, the list proved especially daunting to me, seeing that my knowledge and indeed, mere awareness of up-and-coming and established Australian acts, many who haven’t been heard outside of the country, is quite limited. However, I used the opportunity to familiarise myself with the sound and style of every single act scheduled to appear in Brisbane 5-8 September, knowing that we could see many of them next year at SXSW 2018. This is the first of two best bets posts, this one featuring the first dozen of acts that have so far wowed me on record alone. Some of them were also part of the previously posted playlist with a focus on showcasing bands from Brisbane. You can listen to the Brisbane acts playlist and read the associated feature back here.

I’m looking at my coming over for my first BIGSOUND as TGTF’s opportunity to truly get stuck into the Australian music scene, and I’m very excited. If there are any Aussies out there who have further recommendations on who I should see, Tweet me @theprintedword, and I’ll see what I can do about adding the band to my schedule. For now, here’s 12 of the 24 acts I’ve chosen as best bets for this year’s BIGSOUND. A playlist with all 24 acts is at the bottom of this post.

Ariela Jacobs (Melbourne; singer/songwriter / pop)
The popularity of Lucy Rose proves that there’s still a market for vulnerable, honest female songwriters. Ariela Jacobs falls into this category, with a sweet voice and impressive vocal range, plus plenty of ambition. This Victoria-based songstress has so far released two EPs (2014’s ‘This’ and 2016’s ‘Yesteryear’) and has more new music on the way.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzPtphh6POE[/youtube]

Braille Face (Melbourne; electronic / experimental)
Getting VICE’s attention ain’t easy, but not everyone is Jordan White. In 2015, the prolific White recorded an album a month, which must have changed his outlook on what it means to be an artist. Soulful vocals accompanied by an interesting mélange of electronics, sometimes smooth, sometimes crunchy. Yes.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQ1ZV78XIU4[/youtube]

Cub Sport (Brisbane; synthpop)
Synthpop purveyors Cub Sport have been media for their music, as well as their social views. Two of their members came out gay last year and announced they were in a relationship. Naturally, their truth and what they stand for is important to them and in their latest single and video for ‘O Lord’, frontman Tim Nelson confronts the complicated feelings of love and loss that erupt from moments of second-guessing happiness.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGHUXd177oc[/youtube]

Daggy Man (Brisbane; singer/songwriter / folk)
Daggy Man is the stage name of Thomas Calder, former frontman of the band The Trouble with Templeton, who I incidentally saw the last time I visited Australia. As mentioned then, Calder has a voice like Teitur’s and is a great songwriter of tunes folky and fragile.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xEh96PFxBM[/youtube]

Deadlights (Melbourne; hard rock)
Up to this point reading this, you’re probably wondering when Aussies rock out. Deadlights are a good example of this. Did they name themselves after the terrifying force Stephen King wrote about in It? No matter the source, the name seems to fit the group to a T, as their punishing hardcore style will probably be strong enough to kill something in your line of sight if you listen to them long enough.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqivHwAohTU[/youtube]

Didirri (Melbourne; singer/songwriter / pop)
Time for a moment of chill from a long-haired singer/songwriter, methinks. Didirri is unashamedly a fan of music and times gone by. He even covered the Monkees’ ‘Randy Scouse Git’, which seems like a strange choice for a folk singer, but his a cappella rendition captured the feeling beautifully, and differently. His catchphrase about his own music is “Music for lovers and overthinkers.” so really, how could I refuse?

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1dlqCrvFjJY[/youtube]

Evan Klar (Melbourne; singer/songwriter / pop)
Staying in the same general genre, we arrive at Evan Klar, who’s had an interesting life already. Having been a session musician in London for both Charli XCX and Alex Metric, he’s experienced that side of things. Now he’s doing music for himself, having already signed a record deal with EMI Music Australia without even have played a single show: yes, really, well, unless you count his appearances last year at unofficial showcases at BIGSOUND. His debut album, which is sure to be full of his catchy pop gems, is expected later this year.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PcjrU9PyNho[/youtube]

friendships (Melbourne; drum ‘n’ bass)
Some artists just make music. Some want you to have the whole experience. friendships are a duo combining the elements of sound (Nic Brown) and visual (Misha Grace) to make that happen. While it’s impossible to experience the visual aspect of their performance by simply listening to the music (unless, I guess, you’re hallucinating with or without pharmaceutical aid), the below gives me some idea of what is in store for me in Brisbane.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C05u-OWmo2k[/youtube]

Golden Vessel (Brisbane; electronic / pop)
If it’s pop mixed with electronic you’re after, then Max Byrne, aka Golden Vessel, is your man. Think what Disclosure do with pop singers, and imagine Aussie pop singers brought into the mix.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRaqrsEKWaE[/youtube]

Jim Lawrie (Melbourne; singer/songwriter / rock)
Is the world ready for an Australian to unseat Bruce Springsteen? Jim Lawrie is sure as hell trying to do that. Comfortable with the folkier side of rock as he is with an anthemic rock melody, he’s got an engaging voice that works with both.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEe3TJ8W_oE[/youtube]

Maddy Jane (Hobart, Tasmania; singer/songwriter / pop)
triple j are big fans of Maddy Jane’s newest single ‘No Other Way’, putting it and its predecessor ‘Drown It Out’ on regular rotation on the station. Echoes of Jenny Lewis and Liz Phair (in her poppier days, mind) ring out in her catchy, upbeat tunes that range from more straightforward pop to a louder, rockier sound.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyP8wPOmeXQ[/youtube]

Mammals (Sydney; dream pop / electronic)
Sydney singer, producer and multi-instrumentalist Guy Brown are the brains and feelings behind Mammals. Once a composer for advertising and film, he wanted to create for himself again, choosing to go in a direction fusing folk and pop feeling with electronic sounds. The results will pull you in.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1kUEVuDIQw[/youtube]

 

Preview: BIGSOUND 2017

 
By on Thursday, 20th July 2017 at 11:00 am
 

Americans have SXSW. Brits have The Great Escape. The Irish have Hard Working Class Heroes. If you’re Australian and you fancy yourself having some idea of what is going on in new music in Oz, BIGSOUND in Brisbane is undoubtedly the top music discovery event on your calendar. The 16th annual edition of the conference and festival will be taking place over 4 days in September in Fortitude Valley, the Brisbane suburb known as the hub of nightlife in the city. Recall, too, that September in Australia – in the Southern Hemisphere, down under, natch) is springtime, so the weather’s likely to be absolutely brilliant, eh?

A plethora of both artists and conference alike have already been announced nearly 2 months ahead of the September. On the band front, there’s definitely some names you’ll recognise, including surf slackers Hockey Dad, past SXSW showcasing bands Mansionair and The Creases, plus the recently Stereogum-tipped Sloan Peterson, all Australian. There’s so many names I haven’t heard of being living outside of the country, but I look forward to cueing up all the names on various streaming services in the coming weeks ahead of the big event, then seeing if they’re the real deal on the ground and in the clubs in Fortitude Valley. Check out the growing list of artists scheduled to perform at BIGSOUND 2017 on this page.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GydxpxuRqw4[/youtube]

It’s important to note that while this is of course an Australian event, there will be plenty of representatives from outside of Oz to provide amazing presentations and mentoring opportunities. PIAS cofounder Kenny Gates, storied UK music manager and author Simon Napier-Bell and Sub Pop A&R Stuart Meyer are just three names who will be making the trip out to BIGSOUND, and they’re just the tip of the iceberg. Check out the growing list of luminaries through here.

BIGSOUND 2017 will take place 5-8 September in Fortitude Valley, Brisbane. It’s merely AU$85 for a Rainbow Pass that gives you access to all 4 days of the festival and the closing party. One night passes are still available for Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday nights for AU$45 each. For those who want even more access, including to the conference sessions, be quick, because there’s a special promotion for the Purple Pass going on until 31 July. Members of certain Aussie professional groups (QMusic, AIR, AAM, IMNZ, WAM, Music Victoria, Music NT, Music Tasmania, Music Australia, AMPAL, AIM, WIN, A2IM, CBAA) can snag a pass for AU$470 (regular price AU$570), while nonmembers can get the same pass for AU$570 (regular price AU$670). Get your pass from the official BIGSOUND Web site now.

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

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