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MP3 of the Day #619: Niki and the Dove

 
By on Friday, 7th September 2012 at 10:00 am
 

Niki and the Dove‘s song ‘DJ Ease My Mind’ has been remixed by Twin Shadow, and it’s an interesting result. Listen to and grab it for your very own from below.

 

Liverpool Sound City 2012: TGTF’s stage featuring the Temper Trap, Clock Opera and Dear Prudence – 18th May 2012

 
By on Monday, 11th June 2012 at 2:00 pm
 

If I’m completely honest, I wasn’t really paying that close attention to the sessions I attended on the Friday of this year’s Liverpool Sound City. My mind, running a mile a minute, was worried about the stage we were running that night at the Academy of Arts. The day before, I’d really enjoyed the sessions and had a completely unplanned introduction to John Robb by a mutual friend that I somehow eked by without revealing that I was completely unnerved talking to one of the Northwest’s most enduring and well-known musician/journalists. However, during a particularly boring afternoon on Friday in which some major label folks showed the big companies don’t know how much is discovered, really, I was relieved to get a text from John saying he’d arrived. John ran our stage at Brighton Coalition at the Great Escape with his girlfriend last year, so he is more qualified than the rest of us to see that a TGTF stage runs smoothly. After a comedic meetup – John is way taller than me, so much that he completely walked passed me and I had to yell “John!” – we went to go have dinner in a pub and discussed our plan of attack for the evening before heading out to the Academy of Arts at 5.

It’s a good thing we got there early, as the production team had posted our banner in the wrong place, far, far away from our table. Enter giant John, who quickly moved it with the help of Tyler, the chap who was running all the logistics of the stage for us that night. It was a little nerve-wracking to make sure we had all the merchandise we were going to give away, but we got everything in time: 5 signed copies of Clock Opera’s new album ‘Ways to Forget’, a extra-large Temper Trap shirt (John convinced me that it was better to offer up a big one in case a bloke won it, or a girl could use it as a nightie) and a signed ‘Need Your Love’ vinyl single that even our friend Larry of The AU Review coveted. John pretty much manned the table himself (and swimmingly so), as I went to photograph the bands, take notes and do something I tried to psych myself up for, but was so nervous about: speaking on a mike to get people over to our table for the contests. I had envisioned standing on the stage as I’d seen people at Roskilde do for the smaller stages there, but for logistic and safety reasons, they said I had to do it from the mixing desk. Hearing my voice – and loud – was so scary! And probably I’m guessing all the locals were thinking, “what is an American doing, talking on the PA?” But the contests went well, and everyone who won went away very happy, so that’s all that’s important.

Let’s get to the bands. So first up was Dear Prudence from Brighton. Their debut single, ‘Valentine’, just came out in early May, so this was a good first ‘big’ show for them, one of their first outside of their hometown. I really like how they sound and they’re a synthy, electro rock band (right up my alley!) so they were the perfect support band for our stage. I’m going to keep an eye on them. You can watch the official video for ‘Valentine’ below; it’s got a great beat and it had me dancing.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCI-9dSSvbI[/youtube]

After an intermission, it was time for Clock Opera. I thought it very sweet that Guy Connelly recognised and say hello to me before they went backstage to situate their gear. A punter named Paul declared on Twitter, “WOW!! Think @clockopera may have just taken the best band award @SoundCity with that! ‪#Incredible‬ ‪#SoundCity12”. Good observation.

Clock Opera have the energy and the goods – in super infectious rhythmic tunes that should get every molecule of your body dancing. If you don’t believe me, watch the video below of ‘A Piece of String’, the song Dan Armstrong pointed out to me in this pre-festival interview as the one they all break out pieces of crockery to bang on. Overall, their set was brilliant.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oxqmxhjhixQ[/youtube]

During the day it had been announced Niki and the Dove had cancelled their appearance due to illness, which I think led to our stage getting rammed even further, since the times of their set and the Temper Trap’s overlapped. This was fine by us, as the space kept getting more and more crowded by the minute. In another bit of hilarity, I was refused entry into the photographer’s pit because every photographer in the Northwest and their nan had already taken their places there. Thanks to Tyler’s talking-to that “it’s her stage!” I finally got in. Now, this was my seventh time seeing them, and there is no denying they’re a great live band. I’m still not sold on all the new songs yet, but it was crystal clear after just minutes into their start and after Dougy said, “hello Liverpool, you doing all right?”, it was going to be a night to remember.

From the new love anthem of ‘Need Your Love’ to the gaiety of ‘Down River’, there was something for everyone. To prove their mettle, before the encore the band played a punishing trifecta of rock: ‘Science of Fear’, ‘Resurrection’ and ‘Drum Song’, all with so much raw power and passion, and the crowd loved every minute of it. It should come as no surprise that ‘Sweet Disposition’ closed out the night, cranking up the energy way up inside the venue for a song that so many people hold dear. And then it was over. After handing out the prizes, Toby and Lorenzo briefly stopped in the venue and Lorenzo said to me with a smile, “Mary! It’s been a long time!” I had been a long time since we’d talked; we had a completely unharried chat outside the House of Blues in Boston before their show there. One of the greatest things as a blogger is to watch a band you saw promise in just keep rising in stature in the music scene. If my intuition is correct, I said it before and I’ll say it again: the Temper Trap are well on their way to conquering stadiums. I feel honoured we had them – and the wonderful Clock Opera and Dear Prudence as well – on our first-ever stage at Liverpool Sound City. We’ll be back next year, so here’s to many more! Thank you everyone for making our stage such a success.

 

Great Escape 2012: Day 1 Evening Roundup – 10th May 2012

 
By on Friday, 25th May 2012 at 2:00 pm
 

For some reason, my phone refused to let me subscribe to the Great Escape text service, and without adequate O2 coverage, I hadn’t had a chance in hell to load the official festival app. In hindsight, either of these may have informed me that the entire Island Records showcase at the Loft featuring Lower Than Atlantis, King Charles (my main interest in this stage, after Tom’s hilarious phone interview with the man) and Tribes had been cancelled. But as I learned over this weekend, it pays to have a plan B. And a plan C and D if you can manage it.

The next closest venue with a band I wanted to see was the Haunt, with Pixie Geldof’s band Violet. During my entire time in Brighton I had nothing but good encounters with punters, except for at this venue. It was supposed to be Avalanche City onstage when I arrived at the venue but seeing that I couldn’t see nor hear very well what was happening up front, I gingerly made my way forward in an attempt to get closer to take at least one photo.

Having been inconvenienced with light shoving and pats on the back indicating someone wanted to go past me in a club for nearly all of my adult life, I was taken aback by one punter’s admittedly semi-drunk but all the same nasty complaint, “are you going to stand there all night?” If you were wondering, there were large spaces in front and back of him (he was standing by the bar) and I had hoped that standing in front of him would encourage him to move back a bit to allow me to get a decent line of sight. Fat chance. What’s even stupider was he left right after the band finished. As the saying goes, “it takes a lot more effort to be nasty than to be nice”, and after having one preferred showcase cancelled that night, I was feeling a bit grumpy and I didn’t need further aggravation.

As the sea of festival-goers parted, I made my way to the front to situate myself in a good position to photograph. Good thing I did this early: who knows if it’s because she’s Bob Geldof’s daughter or people actually wanted to see if she was any good, but I witnessed the largest assemblage of photographers seeing Violet, so much it felt more like a flurry of paparazzi with the continual bursts of flash than a meet-up of run of the mill gig photographers. Whatever happened to, “first three songs, no flash”? Even I observe those rules. Grumble. Thank goodness most of them left after the first three songs; you can tell who’s there for merely professional and not actual music-loving reasons because they bolt even before the third song in is finished.

I suppose I’ve benefited from not having grown up with gossip about Geldof’s daughters and their lives, so I went into this with no personal opinion of her and the knowledge that Luke had seen her at a Guardian New Band of the Day show in April and said she was pretty good. If you were wondering, the girl’s got chops and has a spectacular voice. She opened her set with the single ‘Y.O.U.’, a slow-burning, sultry number, but it’s songs like ‘What You Gave Me’ (video below) that exhibit the soulfulness of Pixie’s voice. Given time and more experience, I think she could become one of the most compelling voices of her generation.

She exudes the sexiness of Marilyn Monroe, yet dressing demurely in a white top and an iridescent long (and not short – shocking!) skirt, indicating respect to both the festival and her audience. Like many of the random revelers I’d see over my time in Brighton, she could have worn a skimpy clubber’s type outfit – one that would have been spread round the internet like wildfire – and yet she didn’t’. It’s a shame in this case that most people will probably not bother to listen to her, thinking that she must only be getting the limelight because of her family. And if you are one of those types, you’re doing yourself a grave disservice. Forget who her father is and follow the talent. Good on her.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJCDjwNUUgg[/youtube]

One band that was on everyone’s lips all weekend was Niki and the Dove, who were scheduled to play at Horatio’s on Brighton Pier at a NME-sponsored showcase. (Note: they ended up cancelling their appearance at Liverpool Sound City due to illness, so I never got a chance to see them. Which is okay because I’m not really a fan of their sound based on the recordings I’ve heard.) Friends, an equally hot commodity but has always sounded to me too much like a Phenomenal Handclap Band imitator, were slated to perform before them. However, I’d been advised by long-time Great Escape gig-goers that if I planned to making the trip down the pier, I’d never get back up the hill in time for anything else. Seeing that it was still raining, and the wind had now picked up, the idea of standing on Brighton Pier, especially in a long delegates queue, wasn’t at all appealing. From debriefings from fellow bloggers, it sounds like I missed a great show. But you’ve got to make tough choices sometime…

Thanks to not being able to check my email, I completely missed the confirmation on Maximo Park press passes for their performance at the Dome, so I decided to switch gears again and head to Sticky Mike’s Frog Bar for New Look, followed by the guys I’d serendipitously seen earlier, Zulu Winter. New Look, not to be confused with the high street womens’ clothing shop, is a Toronto husband and wife team who make an engaging brand of electropop. In the currently crowded electronic market, they came up with their own genre, ‘futurepop’, which incorporates unashamed ‘80s synth stylings (can you say ‘keytar’?) with r&b and dubstep. Interestingly, I saw quite a few couples watching the couple onstage, dressed in matching outfits of white dress shirts and black trousers, grooving with their loved ones to the good beats. Verdict: while they sound pretty good, they risk being forgettable.

Zulu Winter followed shortly thereafter. I should probably mention here that Sticky Mike’s performance space is a basement with badly placed support poles and a low ceiling. Not only is it difficult to see if you’re standing in the wrong place, it’s quite claustrophobic and I can’t even imagine being down there if you’re very tall. The stage is also pretty small; Zulu Winter comprises five band members and keyboardist Dom and his many synths had to be placed off the stage because there wasn’t enough room for all of them. That said, if you’re up front like I was, there is no problem. I’m sure singer Will Daunt will never forget this performance, as a large Norwegian made his presence known by shouting, rather annoyingly I might add, for ‘Silver Tongue’ about 3 times between every song.

Considering they hadn’t even released their debut ‘Language’ yet (it was due to be out on PIAS the following Monday the 14th of May), they played a fun, energetic and well-received set that was not at all hampered by bassist Iain Lock’s foot injury, forcing him to get and off stage on crutches. What a trooper. Below is the opening song of their set, ‘Key to My Heart’. (If you’re wondering, the crazy Norwegian’s hooting can be heard at the end of the video.) Keep an eye on these guys; if the album does well, they could be the next big British indie pop band.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2qgHQRTk6Y[/youtube]

Part of the original plan was to see Mystery Jets at the Corn Exchange, so I trudged back up the hill with renewed purpose. When I inquired about the delegates queue, I was told sternly, “there’s only one line [for everyone, with wristbands or badges]. And it’s one in, one out.” I pressed further on why oh why there wasn’t a delegates queue, I was met with stony silence. I saw the queue going around the building and down the block past the Dome. Not getting in there then. I got into the queue for the Pavilion Theatre in an attempt to get in for Django Django and found myself directly in front of Mike Bradford of the Recommender (it’s amazing how many times you accidentally run into everyone at this festival!), who asked staff what the probability of us getting into the venue that night was. It wasn’t looking good. Instead of getting frustrated, Mike suggested we head down to Sticky Mike’s to round off our evening with some drinks, followed by a performance by White Arrows. If a fellow blogger recommends it, you can’t turn it down.

Oh, White Arrows. The lead guitarist looked stoned as he clicked his pair of claves together. I guess that’s okay, considering “the blackest ‘white’ band”, described by the Owl Mag as making a “psychostropical” sound, were throwing down very tropical yet electronic and funky beats. ‘Coming and Going’ is a good example as any of their jangly guitars paired with a danceable and powerful backbeat. Was it really past 1 AM? Didn’t feel like it.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RK7UPhTj6D8[/youtube]

2 AM is probably a good time for bed but somehow I found myself at the very crowded Queens Hotel lobby, surrounded by loud and pissed delegates from all over. Having not eaten anything solid since the afternoon, I also was the proud holder of a large cone of fish and chips procured from the boardwalk, Despite getting frosty looks from hotel security for having brought outside food in, I shared my fish with a very hungry CMU rep who was grateful for some food. That was my attempt to solidify American and English relations for the evening. I said goodbye to my new friends and tucked myself into bed at about, oh, 4 AM? 4 hours of sleep ahead of me? Eep. Well, it’s like Blaine Harrison says in the Mystery Jets song ‘Dreaming of Another World’: “sleep is for the dead”. Right?

 

Live at Leeds 2012: Roundup

 
By on Thursday, 24th May 2012 at 1:00 pm
 

With the festival season beckoning, the seasonal weather up north has brightened up as some of the brightest upcoming stars look to start their summer crawl on Saturday the 5th of May at Live at Leeds, the same weekend as Camden Crawl and ahead of other upcoming major city festivals. With this 1-day line-up arguably looking stronger than the London weekend this year, it’s difficult to see why you wouldn’t drop up for the day, especially with so many bustling venues in the Leeds city centre within a short walking distance.

Beginning TGTF’s day in the city are Manchester dance band Swiss Lips. Whilst the venue may be difficult to navigate, that may be because it’s rammed in the early afternoon. With indie hit ‘U Got the Power’ having given them some heat, the crowd stay for their infectious breed of ‘sexy pop’ and the band are sure to make some friends with their upcoming debut record.

After this, it’s the atmospheric, but not hugely entertaining iLikeTrains at the O2 Academy. Later, Niki and the Dove also suffer the same fate with a great sound that’s not really matched up front in entertainment. Luckily, there’s so much to see at Live at Leeds that you can never be bored for long. Opening up the Met Uni are Bastille. Their recent mixtape has proved popular with the hundreds that have quickly assembled, and away from their own electropop, the tender vocals of Bastille are the highlight, especially in the cover of City High’s ‘What Would You Do’.

Back at the O2 Academy, Spector flounce about the stage with overly polished indie rock. There’s potential here but the act never really materialises to greater things in the songs, being much more annoying than hoped in the process. This leads to TGTF seeing the end of a powerful Dan Mangan set in Holy Trinity Church followed by a packed show from Lucy Rose. The young singer/songwriter’s music fits perfectly in these surroundings and even the more energetic songs such as ‘Red Face’ sound fitting to her increasingly confident set. With a band behind her, Rose has depth to match her stunning voice and the crowd agree, shh-ing anyone that talks, even in between songs. There’s a muted singalong early on to ‘Middle of the Bed’ and throughout the set there’s a real quality to Lucy Rose’s set that shines in this church. As soon as it starts though, it seems to be over and it’s quickly down to the Cockpit for part one of tonight’s two headliners.

With Ladyhawke making her return to the UK with album two, Lianne La Havas stepping up to the headline mark left by Marina and the Diamonds, there’s a lot of talent on display across the headliners of the festival. TGTF’s route is one of a blend of safety and guaranteed fun in the form of the Subways, followed by Scroobius Pip. First up, the Subways rock out a venue half the size of their most recent tour, making the room sweatier than a sauna and more energetic up-front than most football teams. Blending tracks from all three of their diverse records, noughties classics ‘Rock and Roll Queen’ and “Oh Yeah” fit in with the likes of ‘Shake Shake’ and new single ‘Kiss Kiss Bang Bang’ as ‘It’s A Party’ turns lead singer Billy Lunn’s trademark stage dive into a venue-long crowdsurf to the back, up onto the sound-desk and then a dive from 10 feet back down and towards the stage (did you follow that, we nearly didn’t). The man’s got balls, and the Subways still rock.

Closing the night with a set starting long past 11, Scroobius Pip executes a well thought out and powerful set of his solo material to the underground venue. Even without B Dolan by his side on tour, Pip’s tracks have venom and everyone present joins in with every lyric from last year’s record. There’s crowd surfing, huge men bashing each other about and one man with an MCA-stolen VW badge on his necklace up front leading the events. It’s a fitting way to end the night, and TGTF can’t help but feel that the right decisions were made. It’s going to be a bright summer for so many of the artists on the bill at Live at Leeds, there’s no doubt about that, but definitely watch out for the likes of Lucy Rose and Swiss Lips, and by no means underestimate those who’ve been around the block.

 

Live Gig Video: Niki and the Dove perform ‘The Drummer’ for Bands in Transit at the Great Escape 2012 in Brighton

 
By on Tuesday, 22nd May 2012 at 4:00 pm
 

Stockholm band Niki and the Dove was one of the hottest commodities at the Great Escape this year and I’ll admit, I didn’t bother with the queue at Horatio’s on the pier on Thursday night because I figured I’d never get in. (Bad luck, as they ended up cancelling their appearance at Sound City due to illness.) But for me and anyone else who couldn’t be there at the Great Escape this year, we’ve got you covered.

The fine folks at Bands in Transit got the band to perform ‘The Drummer’ on the seafront. You can tell from the wet sidewalk that it was raining quite a bit in Brighton this year, but thankfully the rain held off for this taping. Enjoy it below.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nWUjV-V0cMQ[/youtube]

 

Wolf Gang + S.C.U.M. / October 2011 NME Radar UK Tour

 
By on Wednesday, 31st August 2011 at 9:00 am
 

The Emerge NME Radar Tour in October will see two great bands – Max McElligott and his Wolf Gang (pictured above) and S.C.U.M – play gigs across the UK. Support will come from Stockholm duo Niki and the Dove (2-12 October) and Brisbane, Australia thrashpoppers DZ Deathrays (13-18 October). Tickets are available now.

Sunday 2nd October 2011 – Exeter Phoenix (with Niki and the Dove)
Monday 3rd October 2011 – Bristol Thekla (with Niki and the Dove)
Tuesday 4th October 2011 – Portsmouth Wedgewood Rooms (with Niki and the Dove)
Wednesday 5th October 2011 – Nottingham Rescue Rooms (with Niki and the Dove)
Friday 7th October 2011 – Birmingham O2 Academy (with Niki and the Dove)
Saturday 8th October 2011 – Manchester Club Academy (with Niki and the Dove)
Sunday 9th October 2011 – Newcastle O2 Academy 2 (with Niki and the Dove)
Monday 10th October 2011 – Glasgow King Tuts (with Niki and the Dove)
Wednesday 12th October 2011 – Leeds Cockpit (with Niki and the Dove)
Thursday 13th October 2011 – Norwich Waterfront (with DZ Deathrays)
Friday 14th October 2011 – Oxford O2 Academy 2 (with DZ Deathrays)
Sunday 16th October 2011 – Stoke Sugarmill (with DZ Deathrays)
Monday 17th October 2011 – Brighton Concorde 2 (with DZ Deathrays)
Tuesday 18th October 2011 – London Koko (with DZ Deathrays)

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

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