Looking for previews and reviews of SXSW 2019? Right this way.

SXSW 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | Live at Leeds 2016 | 2015 | 2014
Sound City 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | Great Escape 2018 | 2015 | 2013 | 2012

Don't forget to like There Goes the Fear on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2017: Irish artists showcasing at this year’s SXSW

 
By on Tuesday, 7th March 2017 at 11:00 am
 

The Emerald Isle always sends a strong contingent of acts out to SXSW, and this year for SXSW 2017 is no exception. Having covered Hard Working Class Heroes myself for the first time last October and my new initiative in 2016 to include Ireland as part of TGTF’s official remit make supporting the Irish and Northern Irish artists coming out to Austin all that much sweeter in 2017. In this post, we introduce you to seven acts from different corners of Ireland proper. The summaries of acts below were written by the newest member of our team and our Northern Irish correspondent Adam McCourt. Please note: all information we bring you about SXSW 2017 is to the best of our knowledge when it posts and artists and bands scheduled to appear may be subject to change. To learn when your favourite artist is playing in Austin, we recommend you first consult the official SXSW schedule, then stop by the artist’s Facebook and official Web site for details of any non-official SXSW appearances.

The Academic – rock / Mullingar
The Academic – Craig Fitzgerald (vocals/guitar), brothers Matt (guitar) and Stephen (bass) Murtagh and Dean Gavin (drums) are an indie pop four-piece from Mullingar. Since their performance of their debut single ‘Different’ on one of Ireland’s most watched television shows, ‘The Late Late Show’ they have done nothing but soared to success. They signed a publishing deal with Global publishing in that same year and since have appeared on the bills of top festivals and supported huge names Kodaline, The Strypes, Little Green Cars and opening for The Pixies at The Marquee. Their debut EP ‘Loose Friends’ was released in October 2015. We reviewed their single ‘Mixtape 2003’ and featured its promo video last year, so TGTF are no strangers to these young talents. FFO: Kings of Leon, The Metric System, Stereophonics

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nu8M3Cw6fuU[/youtube]

A.S Fanning – singer/songwriter / Berlin via Dublin
A.S Fanning is a musician, singer, songwriter and producer who was previously the frontman for the underrated Dublin band The Last Tycoons. Since their end, Fanning has relocated to Berlin and began writing music alone. So far, he’s only released one single, ‘Carmelita’ so far; however, keep your eyes and ears peeled for his debut album funded by Kickstarter crowdfunding, ‘Second Life’, expected to drop this March. FFO: The Veils, Editors, Tom Waits

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T4ZkO9KaRv8[/youtube]

Birds of Olympus – rock / Wicklow
Spud Murphy (vocals), Donal Colohan (guitar), Darin Joye (guitar), Rory Clarke (bass) and Derek Byrne (drums) make up the Wicklow based self-proclaimed neo-psychedelic band Birds of Olympus. Keeping in line with their rather cryptic and metaphorical online bio, the birds hatched from their eggs in late 2015, and since have been testing the waters with their fresh blend of pop. They’ve released three singles – ‘Vine of the Soul’, ‘Cinder to the Sun’ and ‘Lights Out’ – and have a debut EP on the way. FFO: Modest Mouse, Villagers, Tame Impala

Cloud Castle Lake – electronic / Dublin
Dublin-based electronic trio Cloud Castle Lake have no fear when it comes to experimenting with sounds. Blending gloomy r&b chord progressions with Aphex Twin-esque acid techno drum grooves topped with an angelic falsetto voice, Brendan Jenkinson, Rory O’Connor and Daniel McAuley have perfected the art of cross-genre music. They released their debut EP ‘Dandelion’ in September 2014 and since then have only put out one single, ‘Glacier’. We’re looking forward to seeing what they unveil in Austin. FFO: Radiohead, Aphex Twin, Wild Beasts, Capua Collective

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=52jv-RxWjJA[/youtube]

EMBRZ – electronic / Dublin
EMBRZ is the brainchild of Dublin-born musician Jack Casey who started out as a guitar player in a band as a teenager. It’s said that an early deadmau5 track turned him on to electronic music. Since this discovery, EMBRZ has contributed massively to the vast world of EDM-influenced music with a rich blend of emotive dance music and downtempo beats. His remixes of The 1975’s track ‘Settle Down’ and Ellie Goulding’s ‘How Long Will I Love You?’ gained over 1 million plays when released and since then have almost tripled. A flurry of singles have been released in the last 2 years: ‘Silent’, ‘Lights’, ‘Home’ and ‘Breathe’. FFO: The 1975, Kygo, Bantum

Loah – soul / Dublin
The music created by Sallay Matu Garnett, aka Loah (pictured at top at an Other Voices show last year), comes as no surprise considering her background. Born in Kenya, but raised between Dublin, Sierra Leone and Maynooth, she now works as a part-time pharmacist in Dublin and writes stellar African infused soul/fusion music. Her rich blend of her African roots is what sets her apart from any other fusion artists, thus pioneering a genre Loah calls “ArtSoul”. Loah recently collaborated with Irish DJ and Bantum on single ‘Take It’ from his 2017 RTE Choice Music Prize Irish Album of the Year Award-nominated debut ‘Move’. FFO: Lianne La Havas, Nina Simone, Childish Gambino, Patti Smith

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HWK2N-uLK0[/youtube]

Picture This – pop/rock / Dublin
When Ryan Hennessy (vocals/guitar) and Jimmy Rainsford (drums) began writing music in 2015, neither of them anticipated that they would sell out 8 dates in total at Dublin’s Olympia Theatre, making Picture This the first band to do this since R.E.M in 2007. Picture This’ success started in 2015 when Hennessey posted a video to Facebook of himself singing ‘Take My Hand’, culminating over 1.2 million views online. They booked a debut show in Dublin’s Grand Social venue, which sold out in less than 30 minutes. The gig moved to The Academy, which also sold out making them the first band to sell the venue out on their first gig. Their self-titled debut EP was released last summer, and we imagine a debut LP won’t be far behind. FFO: The Coronas, Kodaline, Ed Sheeran, Stereophonics

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T72qlb4SVeg[/youtube]

 

CMW 2016: electropop at Studio Bar and more from the Music from Ireland showcase at Rivoli Thursday – 5th May 2016

 
By on Tuesday, 24th May 2016 at 2:00 pm
 

So that I would not miss one of my must-see bands a good 20-minute walk away, I left the Music from Ireland showcase at the Rivoli before Dublin grunge act Fangclub settled onstage. From what I heard from other punters, they went down a treat, so Carrie and I will need to investigate them further at some point. Walking up Spadina Avenue, then west on Dundas Street, I returned to the Studio Bar, where I’d interviewed Llanelli, Wales group Cut Ribbons earlier before dinner.

Featurette CMW 2016 Studio Bar Thursday

I understood The Studio Bar’s lineup for the evening to be entirely electronic, or at least electropop / synthpop based. So it was no surprised to see electronics at the ready when I arrived and local Toronto duo Featurette were performing. They weren’t that bad, per se, but having seen my fair share of mediocre electronic acts at festivals all over the world, it was hard to be impressed. Further dampening any enthusiasm I may have had about them was singer Lexie Jay singing (er, shouting) into a megaphone a song that I’m guessing was by Drake (?), complete with lyrics that can’t be repeated on a family Web site. I give them credit for giving it their all to a handful of onlookers, but not much else.

Cut Ribbons CMW 2016 Studio Bar Thursday

Cut Ribbons, whose debut album ‘We Want to Watch Something We Loved Burn’ was among my top 5 albums of last year. After some warm-up shows in Guelph and an invigorating visit to Niagara Falls that very morning, they were raring to go, eager to show off new material they’ve been working on at home. While I enjoyed them as much as I did seeing them on the Horizons / Gorwelions stage at the Great Escape 2015, I wish there would have been more punters seeing them that night. That would be one of the cons of Canadian Music Festival: if you’re not hyped enough going out to Toronto, and you find yourself at one of the further out venues, you might not get a great turnout. However, professionals as they are, they put on a great show and I’m really looking forward to hearing their newest music – their new acoustic-based music! – when they make it available to the public. For now, check out a live session track of ‘Helen of Troy’ they shared 2 months ago.

Walking back to the Rivoli with much purpose, I was all about making sure I made it in time for Daithi, with whom I’d had a great chat with Wednesday afternoon in Toronto. On paper, a traditional Irish fiddler mixing his instrument with disparate genres of electronic, house and math rock shouldn’t work. However, live, it’s an entirely unique, lively performance. It’s my understanding that many of the punters who saw him earlier in the evening at Drake Underground walked quite a distance back east to see him play a longer set at the Rivoli. At 1:30 in the morning thousands of miles away from Ireland, Daithi succeeded in being the centre of attention at a dance party of his own creation.

Daithi CMW 2016 Rivoli Music from Ireland Showcase Thursday

While I have some friends enjoy EDM a whole lot but don’t enjoy watching an electronic master at work, I love the spectacle. Making something off the cuff, from general guidelines the artist has set but otherwise allowed himself to improvise up and away from, and being present while that ephemeral art is being made is an amazing honour in itself. For more on this exciting musical alchemist, have a listen to my chat with him in Toronto here. Want a feel for his music and with a very happy tabletop cat? You’re welcome.

 

CMW 2016: the first half of Music from Ireland showcase Thursday night at the Rivoli – 5th May 2016

 
By on Monday, 23rd May 2016 at 2:00 pm
 

If you recall reading in my introductory post about Canadian Music Week 2016, this year’s festival had a Focus on Ireland, which meant there was a great turnout of acts from the Emerald Isle. All said and done after the event was over on Saturday the 7th of May, I managed to catch nearly every single Irish band who had come to Toronto, save one. It helped that most of the Irish bands and the many Irish who had emigrated to and were now resident in the city descended on the Rivoli pool hall on Queen Street Thursday night for a full night of bands as part of Music from Ireland’s brilliant showcase during CMW. Counterintuitively, I did not eat anything remotely Irish for dinner, instead downing a massive, entirely from scratch chorizo arepa in Kensington Market to keep me full until I returned to my bed that evening.

I knew that many Irish bands successful enough to cross the Atlantic for our continents music festivals would naturally take to one another. But it was at CMW 2016 that I felt the incredible strength of bands and artists’ ties to each other, bonded together by the fact that they are Irish and they are all about making meaningful music. They showed up to each other’s shows to cheer them on and to hug and high-five them after their gigs, and I started to get emotional. It occurred to me that we have supported so many Irish bands over the years, starting with Two Door Cinema Club in my early blogging days, through to all the Music from Ireland showcases at SXSW and The Great Escape. So I am now on the hunt for an Irish contributor or two to join us at TGTF. If you or someone you know lives in Ireland (north or south), is keen on independent music and would like to write for us, please contact us / me on Twitter with your interest.

Bagels Search Party Animal CMW 2016 Rivoli Music from Ireland showcase Thursday

Young lads Bagels (now rebranded as Search Party Animal) were first up on the bill, starting things off at the 8 o’clock hour with plenty of energy. If you hadn’t heard his accent, you’d have no way of knowing frontman Adam Redmond wasn’t a surfer dude from the West Coast, which is a roundabout way of saying he’s got the boy next door good looks that I expect young girls all over the world to swoon over in due course. But let’s get back to the music. They’ve got that bouncy guitar liveliness that Northern Irish trio Two Door Cinema Club made their name with. You know, remember that sunniness that Two Door used to bring into venues that would light up the room? There’s even a bit of pounding rhythm with jangly guitar that Foals have made famous. If you’re going to sound vaguely similar to other bands, you could do worse, right?

However, the night belonged to MKAI, a band of brothers (literally, not figuratively) from Cork. Evidently, their reputation preceded them, as even before the tall, dark and handsome figures of Cian, Conor, Eoghan and Colm MacSweeny took the stage, there was an excited mass of fans down the front, patiently waiting for them. They have a debut EP out now, ‘Waiting’, which was released last autumn and led to the selling out of their hometown venue Crane Lane Theatre for the EP’s launch party.

MKAI CMW 2016 Rivoli Music from Ireland showcase Thursday

Just a wild guess, but I’m pretty sure every one of those excited fans already have it, as I haven’t seen people jumping up, down and sideways so enthusiastically at a show in a very long time. I’m being serious. My impression of them was as a folk-less Kodaline, with a pop sensibility and massive anthemic builds featuring synth swells and memorable guitar hooks. I (well, we) were not left disappointed. Their new single ‘Nothing Lasts Forever’ is out this Friday, and you can read Carrie’s review of it from earlier in the month here.

As I was busy watching Icelandic singer/songwriter Axel Flovent at Drake One Fifty early Wednesday afternoon, I missed Elm’s performance at the opening Canadian Music Week party at Google’s Canadian headquarters in Toronto. No big deal, as they were part of the Music from Ireland lineup. They describe themselves as an alternative baroque-pop band, but that would seem to suggest they sound like Neil Hannon and The Divine Comedy. Which they do not.

Elm CMW 2016 Rivoli Music from Ireland showcase Thursday

Truth be told, while I find some things in common with this band with other bands that have a cellist, like Wooden Arms or Passport to Stockholm, I actually found singer Dylan Walsh having an Eddie Vedder, Michael Stipe-like presence, except with a lighter touch. The main concern with a less bombastic vocal is having it get lost in the instrumentation, yet Elm manage to avoid that with thoughtful composition. I will say that Elm are a much more visceral proposition live, as when I saw them this night, they were much louder than I expected them to be, which I wonder if it has to do with the venue’s sound mix for the night. I saw them in conversation with some important looking folk on Saturday at the Sheraton, so I hope that means they have some kind of signed deal in place.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8m-6W4Xmh-U[/youtube]

Stay tuned for the rest of my Thursday night at CMW 2016, which includes more from the Music from Ireland showcase, following tomorrow on TGTF.

 

SXSW 2016: Friday daytime at B.D. Riley’s for the Full Irish Breakfast – 18th March 2016

 
By on Monday, 11th April 2016 at 2:00 pm
 

Over the past 3 years, it’s become my personal SXSW tradition to spend the Friday at B.D. Riley’s Irish Pub for the Full Irish Breakfast, hosted by Music From Ireland. Indeed, Music From Ireland has an even longer history of hosting the showcase, as event coordinator Angela Dorgan related to me in this Friday afternoon interview. My chat with Ms. Dorgan was one of several interviews that I would conduct during the course of the day, between sets by a wide variety of Irish artists spanning genres from sweet acoustic folk to hardcore hip-hop.

"Rosie

The first artist on Friday’s bill was Donegal singer/songwriter Rosie Carney, who faced the difficult task of playing her sensitive and subtle songs to a rather groggy crowd who were perhaps more focused on their eggs and coffee than the activity onstage. Her singing voice was in fine form for so early in the day, and though the open stage at BD Riley’s isn’t the optimal venue for acoustic singer/songwriter types, her lilting tones provided a gentle introduction to a showcase that would gain momentum with each successive act.

"Silences

I stepped outside to have this brief chat with Carney after she played, and when I returned, Silences’ frontman Conchúr White had taken the stage. I’d seen White play the day before on the Thursday afternoon Output Belfast showcase at Latitude 30, and his set once again the demonstrated the vast difference between the two venues. While the rowdier crowd and open windows behind the stage at B.D. Riley’s were slightly less receptive to White’s solo set, he managed to make a favorable impression on his audience.

"September

Following Silences’ rather lonely solo set, the stage at B.D. Riley’s became abruptly more crowded with the entrance of Dublin garage rock quintet September Girls. I was glad to catch them this time around, as I missed them previously in 2014, and I’d been tipped off earlier in the week that their new album ‘Age of Indignation’ was not to be missed. As a fan of the Bangles from my early music listening days, I’m naturally intrigued by a band named after their famous Big Star cover, and I’ll be delving more deeply into September Girls’ sound in my upcoming review of the LP. They played an animated set laced with new songs on their Friday afternoon set, and afterward, two of their number graciously gave this interview for your listening pleasure.

"David

Also filling the stage to capacity at B.D. Riley’s were David C Clements and his crew of bandmates, who followed the brash rock of September Girls with an equally intense set of their own. Along with the aforementioned Silences, I’d heard Clements play at the British Music Embassy the day before, and though he played largely the same set list at B.D. Riley’s, I was once again captivated by his heartfelt lyricism and expansive musical style.

Somadrone internal

Next on the schedule was electro/acoustic act Somadrone, aka Neil O’Connor, who Mary had caught earlier in the week at the official Music From Ireland showcase at Maggie Mae’s on the Wednesday night. Though soft-spoken in manner, O’Connor and his drummer Gareth Averill managed to crank up the volume a notch or two during their extended set, which they graciously agreed to play when rapper Rejjie Snow had to pull out of the showcase lineup.

"Enemies

Math rock band Enemies were next to take the stage, and I was so concentrated on their rather consciously intellectual sound that I didn’t immediately recognize drummer Micheál Quinn, who I’d met in this very same place last year when he had appeared in a different context with avant/experimental group Meltybrains? It was revealed during the course of Enemies’ set that Micheál was celebrating his birthday that day, and naturally a chorus of singing and birthday cake ensued. But make no mistake, their pop-tinged single ‘Play Fire’ was equally memorable and upbeat.

"Saint

The afternoon’s trajectory changed slightly with duo act Saint Sister, whose very aptly termed “atmosfolk” gave our ears a welcome moment of respite, switching gears from live drums and wailing guitars to a combination of sweetly-tuned vocals, traditional Celtic harp and modern electronic rhythms. The novelty of seeing a harp on the stage at B.D. Riley’s would have been memorable enough in itself, but the hypnotic quality of Saint Sister’s seemingly anachronous juxtaposition of sounds proved that they are more than just a gimmick. Their music might have been a bit more laid-back than the other acts surrounding them on the Irish Breakfast docket, but as you can hear in my interview with them, they were in high spirits, and the animated energy came through in their performance.

The final act on the Full Irish Breakfast afternoon showcase was Limerick hip-hop trio Rusangano Family (pictured at top), whose new LP ‘Let the Dead Bury the Dead’ was released just last week, along with the video for jazz-tinged album track ‘Lights On’. Their sensational performance in Austin on the Friday of SXSW couldn’t be contained on the small B.D. Riley’s stage, as frontman God Knows leapt out the open window to preach his gospel to the throngs of people on 6th Street, while his bandmates MuRli and DJ mynameisjOhn were left to entertain the madding crowd inside. As you can see in the photos below, even aforementioned Enemies’ drummer Quinn couldn’t resist the urge to snap a few shots of the ecstatic festivities that ended the 2016 Full Irish Breakfast on another epic high.

"Rusangano

Rusangano Family internal 3

 

SXSW 2016: thoughts on Viola Beach and part of Music from Ireland (Wednesday night, part 1) – 16th March 2016

 
By on Monday, 4th April 2016 at 2:00 pm
 

I’ve always loved Wednesday night at SXSW. The initial worries of Tuesday – getting your credentials and seeing your first batch of shows – are over, and the true heart of Austin’s massive music festival is revealed. You’re spolit for choice on what genres and bands to see, and as Carrie described in the start of her post last week on her Wednesday night, it is often a difficult decision of who you should and could be seeing.

In mid-February when we learned of the tragic passing of Warrington indie band Viola Beach in Sweden, I settled on rather quickly that the best ways I knew how to honour their lives were to facilitate our and all our friends to have a good time while in Austin, as well as continue on in the tradition of TGTF in supporting up-and-coming bands much like Viola Beach had been themselves. I asked Carrie to situate herself at the British Music Embassy at Latitude 30 for Steve Lamacq’s opening presentation to pay tribute to the late Viola Beach, so that one of us would be physically on hand to provide support to our fallen comrades and our friends at the BBC and beyond who championed them. It may make me sound like a total wimp but in all honesty, despite all the tragedy I have seen in my life, I feared being in the room during Lammo’s eulogy. In that very room that had hosted so many great bands, I have witnessed so much magic and so many great moments over the last 5 years, I didn’t think I’d be able to handle myself without blubbering.

Instead, I decided in my quiet and steely determination that Wednesday night would be devoted to seeing indie acts hungry for success like Viola Beach. My first stop was the wonderful Maggie Mae’s Gibson Room, which has seen the Music from Ireland showcase Wednesday night for many, many years. As regular readers of our Web site already know, while I enjoy a great many Irish bands, Carrie is truly the de facto Irish expert of TGTF currently, having churned out the Irish and Northern Irish SXSW showcasing artist list the last 2 years, as well as covering the full Irish breakfast. Knowing that I had other things to attend to Friday afternoon and would not be present for the plethora of Irish acts on show at B.D. Riley’s then, it was just my good luck that they were at the start of the bill at the Gibson Room this night.

Somadrone at the Music from Ireland showcase at Maggie Mae's Gibson Room, Wednesday at SXSW 2016

Producer Neil O’Connor is a man who never stays put too long in one place, and with a hand in many different projects. While he’s part of The Redneck Manifesto, having nothing to do with the negative American stereotype and everything to do with the making of instrumental music as a collection of musicians assembled far back in 1998, the project I came to see this night was his solo project Somadrone, joined live by drummer Gareth Averill and not to be confused by a “modern hard rock” band of the same name from Massachusetts.

I was very excited to see what this one-man band had to offer, given that my introduction to him was via the haunting ‘Invitation’ from his latest album ‘Oracle’ (watch it below). This is the kind of music I love: so many layers and textures, yet holding it all together is an underlying dance beat. I don’t know what I was expecting. Maybe more beats, more atmosphere? As I stood in front of him, I wondered if Carrie would have been more appropriate to cover his set here, as I was surprised at the more singer/songwriter-y vibe I was getting as he stood onstage playing his guitar, only occasionally messing with his pre-programmed setup. Or maybe it was just too early in the evening and I hadn’t gotten into my groove yet. As O’Connor’s set went on, the energy level increased, but I felt an opportunity to truly inspire the audience had been lost.

[vimeo]https://vimeo.com/136193953[/vimeo]

Young Hampshire lass Rosie Carney, now calling County Donegal home, shimmered in an unearthly way under the Gibson Room stage lights, looking like a rosy (no pun intended) apparition. Onstage with nothing else but her acoustic guitar, she looked vulnerable, all alone. She has a pretty enough voice and her songs are good, having a gentle fragility, but something I thought that was validated and echoed by other friends who had seen her that week was that she had a pretty dour attitude through her appearances during the week. I don’t know if she herself felt sullen or just shy, but it gave her performance an unsettling, stifling air that may have been appropriate to match the sombre mood of honouring Viola Beach’s memory, but it left me cold.

Rosie Carney at the Music from Ireland showcase at Maggie Mae's Gibson Room, Wednesday at SXSW 2016

 

SXSW 2016 Interview: Angela Dorgan of First Music Contact / Music From Ireland

 
By on Friday, 1st April 2016 at 11:00 am
 

Header photo: Angela Dorgan (third from left) and her jovial crew at the Full Irish Breakfast, 18th March 2016

Ireland’s First Music Contact is “a free information and advice resource for musicians and the independent music sector in Ireland”, headed by CEO Angela Dorgan. One of First Music Contact’s many projects is Music From Ireland, which in collaboration with Culture Ireland “funds and presents the Irish showcases at large international music conferences” such as Eurosonic, Canadian Music Week, The Great Escape, and of course SXSW.

At SXSW 2016 as in years past, the Irish showcases once again included the official Music From Ireland showcase on Wednesday night at Maggie Mae’s and the Full Irish Breakfast on Friday at B.D. Riley’s Irish Pub. It was during the Friday afternoon event that I had a chance to catch up with Angela Dorgan, who was kind enough to step outside for a chat with me even in the midst of her own very busy day. In the interview clip below, Dorgan talked about Music From Ireland’s 12-year history with SXSW, particularly the process of creating rapport and fostering the relationships formed along the way, all in the interest of facilitating Irish artists’ travels to Austin each year.

The high quality musicianship on the Full Irish Breakfast has consistently amazed me for the past 3 years running, and this year’s showcase was no different, featuring eight acts across an array of genres, including folk, electronic, and alt-rock. But Dorgan emphasised that even with this level of talent, the showcase wouldn’t be successful without the hard work and cooperation of the staff at B.D. Riley’s, who most graciously host the Irish Breakfast each year, along with, perhaps, a bit of good old-fashioned Irish luck.

Keep an eye on TGTF for our complete coverage of the Full Irish Breakfast in the coming days. We at TGTF look forward to continuing our own cordial relationship with Music From Ireland at SXSW on our own future trips to Austin!

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

RSS Feed   RSS Feed  

Learn More About Us