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Video of the Moment #2901: Loyle Carner feat. Jordan Rakei

 
By on Thursday, 18th October 2018 at 6:00 pm
 

Header photo by Charlie Cummings

South London hip-hop artist Loyle Carner has returned after an 18-month hiatus with an intriguing new single titled ‘Ottolenghi’. Those of you who consider yourself foodies might recognise the title as the surname of famed Israeli-British chef Yotam Ottolenghi, who is, in a roundabout sort of way, the impetus for the song. The press release for ‘Ottolenghi’, out now on AMF Records, relates that Carner’s moment of inspiration came “when Loyle was quizzed by a family on a commuter train about the ‘Bible’ he was reading, which was in fact the aforementioned chef’s cookbook ‘Jerusalem’.”

The reference to Ottolenghi sits among a handful of other personally relevant references in Carner’s lyrics, including an expression from his grandfather and an allusion to Roots Manuva‘s ‘Dreamy Days’. Carner’s lyrical delivery feels more like spoken word poetry than what we typically think of as rap, and his reflective words are set over a cool, contemplative keyboard and bass groove. The song’s chorus is tinged with a smooth jazz vibe, courtesy of vocalist/producer Jordan Rakei.

Directed by Oscar Hudson of Pulse Films, the video for ‘Ottolenghi’ is decidedly low-tech, but its optical illusions are remarkably clever, creating a subtle kaleidoscopic effect throughout. Viewers with sharp eyes might catch sight of Yotam Ottolenghi himself in a brief cameo appearance. Watch the promo for ‘Ottolenghi’ below and see for yourself.

Along with the new promo video, Carner has announced a run of live dates in the UK and Ireland for next spring, including a double show at Manchester’s Band on the Wall on the first of May. Tickets for the following dates will be available for general sale on Friday, the 19th of October. In the meantime, you can find TGTF’s previous coverage of Loyle Carner right back here.

Saturday 27th April 2019 – Dublin Grand Social
Sunday 28th April 2019 – Edinburgh Caves
Tuesday 30th April 2019 – Leeds Brudenell Social Club
Wednesday 1st May 2019 – Manchester Band on the Wall (early and late shows)
Friday 3rd May 2019 – Brighton Concorde 2
Saturday 4th May 2019 – Bristol Trinity
Tuesday 7th May 2019 – London Roundhouse

 

Single Review/Essay: Loyle Carner – Ain’t Nothing Changed

 
By on Tuesday, 2nd May 2017 at 12:00 pm
 

Benjamin Gerard Coyle-Larner, better known by his stage name Loyle Carner, has had quite a year so far. The South London-born hip-hop musician released his debut album ‘Yesterday’s Gone’ in January 2017 to critical acclaim, as well as embarking on a sold out UK and European tour. Musically, Loyle Carner brings an organic, lyrically conscious form of hip-hop we haven’t heard too much of coming out the UK for some time, and often associated with seminal American artists such as Mos Def, De La Soul and Tribe Called Quest.

This is not to say Loyle Carner doesn’t sound intrinsically British, because he does. As soon as the vocal kicks in there is no mistaking that London accent, part of the newfound pride and prominence we have seen in the recent years of UK MCs rapping in their own accents and moving away from adopting a American twang. There is raw emotion and family grief laid bare in his lyrics as he raps over laid-back, often jazz-infused beats provided by DJ, producer and fellow wordsmith Rebel Kleff. There are no 140 bpm beats that the current grime resurgence has flooded the streets with, but mellow head- nodding beats that bring a relaxed, ‘feet up and put the kettle on’ vibe. Loyle Carner tells stories that conjure up inner city images of desperation, personal loss, love and tales of friends whose destiny seems written for them.

Previous single ‘Ain’t Nothing Changed’, originally released in 2015, is getting another airing, as is so often the case with artists who are received well beyond initial expectation. The track was re-released last Friday with its original video of an imagined Loyle Carner in his old age muttering the words ‘Ain’t Nothing Changed’ as he sips he tea, cooks and watches football. The stand out part of this composition is the mellow, jazz-tinged saxophone that runs though out the track, providing a melancholy that perfectly fits the lyrics of the repetitive circle life appears to move in around him. “I feel it but can’t conceal it see, this inner city responsibility’s killing me”. On this track, Loyle observes his environment, takes it in and spits it out through his sleepy, yet anything but tired bars. The track manages to breathe new life into UK hip-hop, while talking about a gloomy sense of life feeling stagnant: not an easy feat, but it works beautifully.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5toq05ctFk[/youtube]

On this track, and indeed on album ‘Yesterday’s Gone’ as a whole, we hear a style free of any overly started masculine bravado that so many in the rap community seem to have built into the their fibre. Instead, when listening to Carner, we hear a vulnerability almost impossible for the listener to ignore. You get the sense that putting words to music is nothing but vital to Carner, an indispensable outlet that carries him though life. When we hear him rap on 2015 single release ‘BFG’; “Everyone says I’m fucking sad, of course I’m fucking sad I miss my fucking dad”, we get a sense of a young man who needs to air his emotions and is able to do so in a pure and honest way that attracts the sort of fanbase that Loyle has, ‘Loyal’ being the keyword. His last single release ‘The Isle of Arran’ exemplifies this personal tone in the powerful opening lines, “Know that I’ve been grieving, know that I’ve been holding out hoping to receive him, I’ve been holding out for G and he was nowhere to be seen when I was bleeding”. These are the words of a man who is willing to bear all and more, in this tale of young fatherhood, masculinity and personal memories of his granddad, moving the absent father stereotype around and showing a side of young fatherhood not so often portrayed.

With a string of new UK tour dates just announced throughout September and October, 2017 looks set to be an active year for the young hip-hop maestro. In an exciting time for UK urban music, Loyle Carner brings something unique and lyrically brave while drawing inspiration from the established traditions within hip-hop. And I, for one, feel better off for it.

7.5/10

‘Ain’t Nothing Changed’ is available now from AMF Records.

 

Loyle Carner / September and October 2017 UK/Irish Tour

 
By on Tuesday, 18th April 2017 at 9:00 am
 

Hip-hop artist Loyle Carner has announced a massive tour for this autumn. He’ll be bringing his critically acclaimed debut album ‘Yesterday’s Gone’, released last year on AMF Records, across the UK and Ireland. Tickets to this tour are on sale now. Below the tour dates, I’ve included the third installment of his behind-the-scenes videos for his last UK tour to support ‘Yesterday’s Gone’; the other videos in the series can be viewed on Carner’s YouTube.

Wednesday 27th September 2017 – Dublin Button Factory
Thursday 28th September 2017 – Glasgow ABC
Saturday 30th September 2017 – Liverpool Arts Club Theatre
Sunday 1st October 2017 – Leeds Stylus
Tuesday 3rd October 2017 – Birmingham Institute
Wednesday 4th October 2017 – Bristol Academy
Friday 6th October 2017 – Brixton Academy
Saturday 7th October 2017 – Portsmouth Wedgewood Rooms
Sunday 8th October 2017 – Norwich UEA
Tuesday 10th October 2017 – Exeter Phoenix
Wednesday 11th October 2017 – Nottingham Rescue Rooms
Thursday 12th October 2017 – Manchester Ritz

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1marPKU6GTY[/youtube]

 

LeeFest Presents: The Neverland 2016 Roundup

 
By on Friday, 5th August 2016 at 2:00 pm
 

When you think of Neverland, you consider the following synonymous: timelessness, youthful vigour and a certain transcendence. In the middle of a forest in Kent, near Edenbridge, Neverland became a reality through the help of Lee and his homegrown festival Leefest 2016. Though the weather was not quite ideal upon first landing, it was far from an issue. The moment you wandered into the main arena, it was clear the only thing that would stop a good time being had would be those adult thoughts that should’ve been, at this point, relegated to the outside world. Neverland’s sole purpose over these 3 days was to be a vehicle for your removal from society and instead to provide you a good time.

Split into three main sections, The Neverwoods (main arena), Mermaids Lagoon (rave central) and Skull Ridge (rock city), you were never far from some form of entertainment. The introductory day, Thursday, saw the smallest of the lineup but definitely the strongest. With only Tootles Circus, your average festival tent, operating as a stage, all four acts were nice and accessible. Peluche and Loyle Carner eased the gaining crowd in, but it was the main attractions of Everything Everything and Ghostpoet (pictured at top) who garnered in the big numbers. With Everything Everything, they perfectly stoked the crowd’s fire and brought their unique blend of rapturous choruses and genre bending music. Conversely, Ghostpoet gave the tent a dark atmosphere with his blend of hip-hop-cum-rock-assault.

Friday brought forth the first full day affair, with Peluche once again kicking proceedings off, but this time on the main stage, aka the ‘Bangerang’ stage. The overall setup of the main arena was easily navigated but with the two stages being centrally located, sound spill was inevitable. Fortunately this didn’t happen frequently, though it’s a dangerous game to play. Highlights from the second day included Corey Fox-Fardell and his brand of songwriter electro melding, which was a particularly pleasant listen whilst grazing in front of the Bangerang stage. Little Simz proved why she is one to watch in the UK hip-hop game, leading the enthusiastic crowd through numerous chants as she dominated the beats surrounding her. In a similar fashion, Roots Manuva brought domineering and commanding beats that just reinforced the entire notion behind LeeFest: you can be who you want, and listen to what you want, as long as you have a good time. Rockers, hip-hoppers and the like were all moving and shaking to the sounds that flowed from the Bangerang stage.

Current London-based pop troubadour Oscar provided his blend of melodic darling instrumentation and baritone vocals. One thing’s for sure, you can’t not have a good time at an Oscar show, no matter the crowd size or venue. Dinosaur Pile-Up sat on top of the kingdom of chaos and noise after a headlining set at the Hook Rock stage in the Skull Ridge. It’s was a venue reminiscent of small clubs, where the noise cascades from all orifices and you’re able to lose yourself in the darkness amongst your other perspiring peers. Barrelling through their grunge/punk hybrid hits, the volume was overbearing at the front. We recommend you watch from a safe distance if you’re stupid enough to forget ear protection (a particular note to self).

The final day started off in stereotypical British style, with grey clouds and intermittent rain, but this didn’t affect the atmosphere. Hannah Lou Clark was a particular highlight: sans band, she used both her pure talents and an iPod to create a wonderfully relaxed and charming environment. Everybody’s favourite indie twosome We Are Scientists provided a particularly raucous set that included singer Keith Murray venturing deep into the crowd during ‘Textbook’, where he proceeded to enlist the help of a particularly fluorescent orange Poseidon who was amongst the crowd. Following these shenanigans was current electro-indie darling Shura, having released her debut album ‘Nothing’s Real’ in July. Delivering a captivating set that never failed to both strike you emotively and melodically, the biggest draw of Shura live is the fact she is clearly there because of the sheer love and devotion for her art. She knows what she likes to dance to and fortunately, we do too.

Originally announced to take place on the Thursday, after a mishap with the programs and the cat being let out of the bag early, the not-so-secret secret set from Frank Carter & The Rattlesnakes Saturday evening was the perfect climax to this weekend of escapism and release. The pure fury that comes with any Frank Carter show is cathartic enough to make sure you leave with a weightlessness, one that can only be achieved by taking part in both a circle pit and storming the stage, two things this fortunate writer was seen doing.

After all is said and done, the aforementioned sole purpose of LeeFest was achieved. With pirates and lost boys running around shooting each other with water pistols and climbing aboard the decorative dens around the stages, it was impossible to not get lost in the affair. A festival that catered to both families and those of all ages looking to simply cut loose, the promise this event holds is even grander than its current fasthon. Considering this was Leefest’s largest year yet, the sky’s the limit. And with the lead lost boy at the helm, LeeFest could very well be a major player for years to come.

 

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2016: Huw Stephens with PRS for Music and British Music @ SXSW at the British Music Embassy – 15th-16th March 2016

 
By on Monday, 29th February 2016 at 12:00 pm
 

The British Music Embassy will return to Latitude 30 at 512 San Jacinto Boulevard, right by the heart of the action off 6th Street during SXSW 2016. Get ready, because the lineups are looking pretty brilliant! In this post, I’ll be previewing the talent on show from Tuesday evening through Wednesday evening. We’ll be running additional previews of the BME’s programming later this week, including another one by me on the artists of Thursday’s bill and Carrie’s own to tip the offerings all day Friday and Saturday to close out the festival.

As he has done for many years running, BBC Radio 1 specialist presenter Huw Stephens will be hosting the opening night of festivities at Latitude 30. This year, this showcase is being put on with the auspices of the UK music copyright, licensing and royalties body PRS for Music. Huw has put together an eclectic bill with no two acts in the same exact genre. Get down to the venue early to experience Kent’s self-described ‘dirty pop’ quartet Get Inuit (our past coverage of them here), who are currently working on their debut album, with help on its financing thanks to the kind backing of PRS themselves. Lo-fi post-punk will be provided by Belfast’s Girls Names (our past coverage of them here). They released their fourth album ‘Arms Around a Vision’ on Tough Love Records last autumn. The scuzz in your ears from the first two bands will be washed out by the social commentary of Hertfordshire teenager Declan McKenna, who I profiled last month in this SXSW 2016-flavoured Bands to Watch feature.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xq4-IpRAr0c[/youtube]

Pop continues on in an equally unique but slightly different way with the quirky yet lovable Oscar. He will be releasing his debut album ‘Cut and Paste’ on Wichita Recordings in May. For the next act on the bill, a head up to the North West is in order for Liverpool’s Clean Cut Kid and their bouncy, indie pop melodies and amazing harmonies. Rebecca profiled them with recent tourmates and fellow SXSW 2016 showcasing band Fickle Friends back here in January. The night will be closed out with the pomp and oomph of hip hop of South London’s Loyle Carner, using his rhymes to express his perspective on life.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GazJC5cAcIw[/youtube]

The music continues Wednesday afternoon at the British Music Embassy. Chad Valley is Oxford’s own chill wave artist Hugo Manuel when he’s not busy with his other band Jonquil or remixing the work of his mates Foals, among others. He’ll start the day’s activities with synthy goodness. He’s followed by Welsh band The People The Poet, one of BBC Radio 2’s Dermot O’Leary’s favourite discoveries from last year’s festival (read our past coverage on the band here). The bill then turns its focus to Cheshire-bred singer/songwriter legend Jane Weaver. The lineup stays in the North West for former Liverpool choir boy turned pop artist Banners, who released his self-titled EP last month on Island Records (read our past coverage on him here, including Rebecca’s Bands to Watch from January). The afternoon’s programming ends with East Hampshire trio and Transgressive Records signees Blaenavon. Their in-your-face sound was recently reigned in for this recent Burberry Acoustic video for ‘Dragon’ live in Manchester.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-0APoy4rdw[/youtube]

Latitude 30 will reopen for Wednesday evening at the British Music Embassy for the previously previewed BBC Introducing and PRS for Music Foundation night. It will begin with a touching tribute to the late Viola Beach and their manager Craig Tarry. The band from Warrington were due to open the BBC Introducing night before they who lost their lives tragically in a car accident in Sweden last month. We encourage all to attend and pay their respects to our fallen friends.

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

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