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Update: 6 Music Festival 2016

 
By on Thursday, 21st January 2016 at 11:00 am
 

Following on from the previous announcement back in December that the event would be moving south in the new year, the full line-up for the 6 Music Festival 2016 (12-14 February) was announced on air Tuesday. Tickets are on sale this coming Monday, the 25th of January, at 10 AM, and below are the ‘greatest hits’ of sorts on all the details on the 3 nights of music in Bristol happening in just over 3 weeks’ time.

Previously revealed headliner Primal Scream will be playing Friday the 12th of February at Motion. Bobby Gillespie and co. will be joined by Yeasayer (check out their latest video for ‘I Am Chemistry’ below), Roots Manuva, Savages (who are releasing their newest album ‘Adore Life’ on Matador Records this Friday), !!!, BBC Introducing darlings from Stockport Blossoms and Sherwood & Pinch. Tickets to Motion for this evening will be £35 each (plus booking fee and postage). However, Friday’s festivities are just a mere aperitif to the rest of the exciting weekend in the trip-hop capital of the world.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7XzqCUbiPc4[/youtube]

For indie kids of all ages, Motion’s Saturday headliner Suede (pictured at top, with one of their newer singles ‘Outsiders’ below) are sure not to disappoint. With their newest album ‘Night Thoughts’ – the follow-up to their triumphant 2013 comeback ‘Bloodsports’ – out this Friday, they’re sure to wow with their legendary classics and soon to be classic tunes. Frankly, I’m just a little jealous I won’t be in Brizzle to see Brett Anderson holding court at “the UK’s most unique music venue” (their words, not mine). In this interview and live session Tuesday morning with 6 Music presenter Lauren Laverne, Anderson himself said he was super excited that Elena Tonra and Daughter, who have just released their own new album ‘Not to Disappear’ earlier this month, will be playing the same stage. Other artists on the Motion stage on Saturday night include 2015 Mercury Prize-nominated artist Roisin Murphy and C Duncan, the previously announced Tricky presenting material from his own new album ‘Skilled Mechanics’, Beta Band alum Steve Mason and Sunderland brother duo Field Music, also due to release a new album of their own, ‘Commontime’, at the start of February with Memphis Industries. Tickets to Motion on Saturday will be £35 each (plus booking fee and postage).

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AL15Nvlf7ZU[/youtube]

Saturday evening activity also kicks off at two more venues. The electronic grooves of Underworld and Roni Size & DJ Krust are the biggest names at the venerated Colston Hall, but they are supported by popular American rockers White Denim, the weird and wonderful Ezra Furman, youth favourite from Essex RAT BOY and Welsh songstress and ex-Pipettes Gwenno (introduced here), among others. The cavernous Academy will see American rock pioneer and Hüsker Dü founder Bob Mould supported by Mystery Jets (fresh off the release of their 5th album ‘Curve of the Earth’ last week) and Spanish girl group and flavour of the moment Hinds. A ticket to gain access to both Colston Hall and Academy on Saturday will £40 (plus booking fee and postage).

On Sunday at Motion, things turn back towards relatively newer indie (well, at least newer than Suede, ha), with Foals, Manchester’s Everything Everything, Beirut, Frank Turner and the Sleeping Souls, Polica, Kurt Vile and Mercury Prize-nominated experimental rock band The Invisible. Sunday night tickets to Motion will cost £35 (plus booking fee and postage).

Arguably the stronger night at Colston Hall, when Laura Marling, John Grant, 6 Music presenter and Elbow frontman Guy Garvey and Julia Holter will take the stage, along with many other acts. However, if you’re looking for more mainstream entertainment (to me, anyway) to round out your weekend in Bristol, the Academy will play host to the legendary Buzzcocks, the return and retooling of Bloc Party (seriously, have you heard ‘The Good News’ from their upcoming album ‘Hymns’? If not, hear it below) and the latest of young Liverpudian hopefuls ahead of their maiden voyage to SXSW in March, Hooton Tennis Club. A ticket to access both venues Sunday night will set you back £40 (plus booking fee and postage).

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ox68svCfm8k[/youtube]

And in case this post hasn’t been enough information overload for you, there’s still the line-up of the 6 Music Festival by Day – artists of spoken word, poetry and performance having their turn in the limelight – yet to be announced next Tuesday, the 26th of January. And for the first time, even sister station BBC Radio 4 is getting into the spirit this time round, with the Miles Jupp-hosted panel show The News Quiz landing in and being recorded in Bristol during the festival. So there’s really no excuse not to be excited by the goings-on down south. Don’t fret if you can’t travel to Bristol or don’t manage to score tickets after they’ve gone on sale. (In case you hadn’t heard what happened in the past 2 years in Manchester and Gateshead, the tickets will fly out the door as soon as they go on sale, so you’ll have to be quick.) The BBC will be bringing you coverage on 6 Music, BBC Red Button, and iPlayer, so they’ll have you covered.

Right. So I’m going to go back to my corner again and sob that I’m missing Suede live again…

 

Live Review: Laura Marling with Marika Hackman and Johnny Flynn at 9:30 Club, Washington, DC – 31st July 2015

 
By on Monday, 3rd August 2015 at 2:00 pm
 

Laura Marling made big waves back in the spring when she released her fifth album ‘Short Movie’, which was recorded out in Los Angeles when the otherwise normally London-based singer/songwriter made a temporary escape to America. Despite her young age – she’s only 25, though with a back catalogue like hers to be proud of, she seems so much older – her music has already undergone significant change from her earliest appearances as a backing vocalist on Noah and the Whale‘s debut album ‘Peaceful, the World Lays Me Down’ and her first solo album released in 2008, ‘Alas, I Cannot Swim’. With ‘Short Movie’, her music seems even more honest than before, and she’s also chosen a harder edge that she’d only begun to explore in the 2013 Mercury Prize-nominated ‘Once I Was an Eagle’. Keeping in mind this evolution in style, it became apparent after talking with fans in the queue outside the 9:30 that the “new” Laura Marling had mixed reviews. Having not seen perform since 2011, I was keen on seeing how her live performance had changed in 4 years.

Marika Hackman live at 9:30 Club, Washington 2015 2

Along for the ride with Marling on this North American campaign are her musical friends Marika Hackman and Johnny Flynn, the former describing in a chat with me before the show that their friendship has made this journey out to our continent fun and stress-free. Hackman was up first Friday night and although she’s not well known in America – yet – the general consensus with those I spoke to after her set was overwhelming positive. Wearing what she described as her pajamas because she hadn’t packed well for the oppressiveness of American summer (the high for DC on Friday was 92 F, or 33 C), she apologised for wearing a t-shirt and mens’ boxer shorts, while also telling all the young girls in the audience she should take her lead and make the fashion trend stick. Her stage banter was funny and disarming, a theme that was repeated in both Flynn and Marling’s own sets.

Marika Hackman at 9:30 Club, Washington 2015 1

However, when it came down to the actual performance, Hackman’s fragile, emotional voice and adept acoustic guitar playing went down a treat. She released her debut album ‘We Slept at Last’ on Dirty Hit Records back in February, and the beauty of songs being sung and played with such sensitivity, which included early LP single ‘Drown’ and my personal favourite ‘Ophelia’ reverberated through the club. Her cover of American Joanna Newsom’s ’81’, which features on her ‘Sugar Blind’ EP released in 2013, was equally gorgeous. For ‘Animal Fear’, Marling’s bass player and drummer came onstage to accompany Hackman, the resulting sound and rhythm getting punters’ head bopping. It’s not too hard to imagine this talented singer/songwriter gracing this stage as a headliner sometime soon. For more on Marika Hackman on TGTF, go here.

Singer/songwriter and now also actor Johnny Flynn was next, and judging from the screaming and squealing from the girls and women in the crowd, security placed a barrier at the front to deter his devoted fans from scrambling onstage. While Flynn’s deep voice live surprised me, there wasn’t a whole lot about his set that grabbed at me. Also, his voice got drowned out by those around me who were singing along loudly (more power to you, I guess, but it was really distracting). A duet with Laura Marling on ‘The Water’ was recreated live, much to the delight of the punters. Having several albums to his name, he smartly took a trip through his back catalogue, including standouts ‘Brown Trout Blues’ from 2008 and the title track of 2010’s ‘Been Listening’. He ended his set on a high note, enlisting the help of Marling’s backing band and both the voices and hand percussion talents of Marling and Hackman on ‘Tickle Me Pink’. Needless to say, his foaming at the mouth fans would have preferred for him to have played longer. For more on Johnny Flynn on TGTF, go here.

Laura Marling and Johnny Flynn duetting at 9:30 Club, Washington 2015 1

Then it was time for the main event. I still have trouble getting over her short-cropped haircut (I asked myself when I saw her at SXSW 2015, “where are her long blonde locks?”) and while I realise it’s been a long time since I saw her play in 2010 in the very intimate Iota, it’s still jarring to me that she’s all grown up. Marling was always mature for her age, and on ‘Short Movie’, it sounds like she’s sharpened her resolve to be her own person and to write and sing about what she wants, and with the emotions on full display. I find it hard to listen to Marling’s more recent work, and this proved also true when I was faced with her live Friday night.

Laura Marling at 9:30 Club, Washington 2015 1

This is not criticism of her talent, of which we all know Laura has loads of; it’s more a commentary of the rough-edged, straightforward and therefore often strident way her music comes across these days. There’s no more contrast you could have than Marling performing the relationship-weary ‘I Was an Eagle’ from her 2013 album alongside the sweetness and naivete of ‘Alas, I Cannot Swim’. The evolution of Marling’s music includes bluesy bents evident in ‘Walk Alone’ and discarded ‘Short Movie’ track ‘Daisy’, the latter of which has the fantastic line “a woman alone is not a woman undone”. Like Joan Baez and Joni Mitchell before her, Marling is forging her own way in this world, and there needs to be more artists like her who aren’t afraid of being honest.

Laura Marling at 9:30 Club, Washington 2015 2

After the cut: Laura Marling’s set list. To read more on Marling on TGTF, go here.
Continue reading Live Review: Laura Marling with Marika Hackman and Johnny Flynn at 9:30 Club, Washington, DC – 31st July 2015

 

Live Gig Video: Laura Marling shares new director’s cut video for ‘I Feel Your Love’

 
By on Wednesday, 22nd July 2015 at 4:00 pm
 

I’m not exactly sure what Laura Marling is doing in terms of promoting her current album ‘Short Movie’, which came out back in March. I totally get why she has had her series of Short Movie Sessions videos, including early teaser ‘False Hope’ and another version of ‘I Feel Your Love’ in March, because it was talking up the album just prior to its release.

So imagine my confusion getting a link to another ‘I Feel Your Love’ live video, this one dubbed with a director’s cut label. This one’s black and white and the camera is focused squarely on Marling from the neck up. Otherwise, I don’t really get the difference – ? Watch it for yourself below and have a think about it.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3OsJE2KQo8[/youtube]

 

Live Gig Video: Laura Marling shares live performance of ‘Short Movie’ track ‘Strange’

 
By on Tuesday, 23rd June 2015 at 4:00 pm
 

This week now LA-based English singer/songwriter Laura Marling has a new live performance video she wants to share with the world. From the same ‘Short Movie’ sessions that yielded these live videos of ‘I Feel Your Love’ and ‘False Hope’, ‘Strange’ gets a similar warts and all treatment. Watch the performance below.

Past TGTF coverage on Laura Marling, including several of her appearances at this year’s SXSW, is this way.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uLOw8ywYMUU[/youtube]

 

SXSW 2015: Friday night’s Communion Music showcase at St. David’s Episcopal Church – 20th March 2015

 
By on Friday, 10th April 2015 at 12:00 pm
 

After the madcap hustle and bustle of the full Irish breakfast at B.D. Riley’s Irish Pub, I was ready for something a little more relaxing to finish my Friday night at SXSW 2015. And since it was still raining, I was happy to settle in for the night in the warmth of St. David’s Episcopal Church for the Communion Music showcase. I had attended the 2014 Communion showcase at St. David’s and was amazed by the talent on display there, including Bear’s Den and Hozier, so though I wasn’t familiar with all of the artists on the 2015 lineup, I eagerly anticipated another night of incredible music. Let’s just say that I wasn’t disappointed.

Tove Styrke at Communion St David's 20 March 2015

The night’s first artist was Swedish songwriter Tove Styrke, whose spunky, hook-heavy pop style came as a bit of a surprise in the context of the St. David’s chancel. She was energetic and engaging, and her songs would surely have had her audience dancing if we hadn’t been respectfully seated in pews. I recently heard her single ‘Borderline’ playing on the radio here in America, which leads me to assume that she had a positive SXSW experience in terms of gaining exposure, and I will happily count myself among her new fans.

Laura Marling at Communion St. David's 20 March 2015

In a bit of fortuitous timing, I had caught Laura Marling’s set at the BBC Barbecue on Thursday, and after that brief taste of songs from her new album ‘Short Movie’, I was interested to see her play again at St. David’s. Her set at the Communion showcase was a bit rough around the edges, with a notable lyric flub during (of course) ‘David’ that sent her into a fit of giggles, but I was mainly impressed with her storytelling on stage, both in her incredibly sharp new songs and her mild-mannered banter in between them. Balancing her powerful lyrics with music that was by turns delicately pensive and fiercely emotional, Marling proved once again that she is a force to be reckoned with on the singer/songwriter scene.

Foreign Fields at Communion St David's 20 March 2015

Next on the docket was a band I hadn’t heard of before, but who will definitely be on my radar from this point forward. Nashville duo Foreign Fields were perhaps an obvious choice for the Communion showcase, with sumptuously orchestrated melodies and lush vocal harmonies, but in this case the obvious choice was also a wise one. Foreign Fields’ music was both as complex and as pastoral as their name would imply, particularly current single ‘I Have Your Weapons’.

Leon Bridges at Communion St Davids 20 March 2015

I was also unfamiliar with the next artist, American soul singer Leon Bridges, but judging from the number of people who streamed into the sanctuary before and during his set, his reputation had preceded him to Austin. Accompanied by a full band including brass and a pair of female backup singers, Bridges treated us to a gospel-tinged sermon on the retro artistry of Motown, starting with a track called ‘Better Man’ before touching on popular single ‘Coming Home’. Bridges was suave on-stage, and his songs were laced with a smooth r&b style that swiftly warmed the room on this cold and rainy evening.

James Bay at Communion St David's 20 March 2015

If you’ve been reading TGTF regularly in the past few months, you’ll already be acquainted with Hitchin’s hatted prodigy James Bay. I had seen Bay on tour with Hozier here in America last autumn, and I remarked on the similar career trajectory the two songwriters have taken in my recent review of Bay’s album ‘Chaos and the Calm’. Bay took the opportunity here at the Communion showcase to whet our appetites for the new album, which was released the following Monday, and to further fan the flames sparked by his soaring hit single ‘Hold Back The River’.

Jack Garratt at Communion St David's 20 March 2015

As I’ve remarked previously in my SXSW 2015 coverage, the last artist on a showcase is often left to perform for a dwindling audience, especially at night shows where the final slot actually begins in the wee hours of the following morning. Such was the case for Jack Garratt, and once again it was a shame that so many people left without hearing him play. I had thought that his electronic style might be an oddity for the Communion show, but as he progressed through his set, it became very clear that Garratt is, at heart, a singer/songwriter who happens to base his music on electronic instrumentation rather than the typical acoustic foundation. He deftly played keyboard, guitar and percussion to accompany his own singing, and I left at the end of his set feeling both delightfully impressed by his skill and sad for the people who had missed out. You can find previous TGTF coverage of Jack Garratt, including his upcoming UK tour dates, right here.

Communion Music continues to highlight a fine array of up and coming artists, and their showcase at St. David’s once again proved to be a popular Friday night choice. In the past, the show has been open to the public, but this year the audience was restricted to official SXSW badges and wristbands. That decision was most likely prompted by increased attendance, and though many disappointed punters were turned away this year, it’s nice to see Communion artists receiving such well-deserved attention.

 

SXSW 2015: Thursday afternoon at the BBC barbecue, British Music at SXSW showcase and the historic Driskill Hotel – 19th March 2015

 
By on Tuesday, 7th April 2015 at 12:00 pm
 

After the delightful Lost in Austin brunch on Thursday morning, I made my way back across the Colorado River and into downtown Austin. I had just enough time to grab a cup of coffee and jot down my thoughts before I received a text message from editor Mary, who wanted me to stop in and join her at the Old School Bar and Grill for the BBC barbecue. Mary has already covered the event in full, but I was lucky enough during my brief stop to catch a set by Laura Marling, including songs from her newest album release ‘Short Movie’, which TGTF previewed back in December.

While Marling did her preliminary soundcheck on the Old School Bar and Grill stage, I took the opportunity to scout out the room for good photo angles. I was testing the settings on my camera when another photographer made a comment to me about how beautiful Marling’s guitar collection was. I agreed, and thus found myself in an informative conversation with SXSW 2015 staff photographer Ziv Kruger about shooting effective photos at SXSW shows. Kruger took a quick look at my camera and gave me a few useful tips, which I immediately put to use in photographing Marling and her band. (If you’re interested in seeing more of my photos of the set, check them out on my Flickr.)

Laura Marling at BBC BBQ 19 March 2015

Laura Marling at BBC BBQ 19 March 2015

After Marling played, the BBC barbecue started to wind down, and I headed over to the British Music Embassy at Latitude 30 to catch The Twilight Sad, with whom I’d had a nice chat earlier in the week. I arrived at Latitude 30 in time to hear the end of a set by fellow Scottish band Roddy Hart and the Lonesome Fire, whose six-piece band set up was a tight fit for the British Music Embassy stage.

Roddy Hart and the Lonesome Fire 19 March 2015

Despite the close quarters, Roddy Hart and the Lonesome Fire impressed me with the size of their anthemic rock melodies, and I made a mental note to listen to them again after returning home from my trip to Austin. Their single ‘Bright Light Fever’ earned the band a week-long residency on Craig Ferguson’s Late Late Show in America early last year, and it was a hit at the British Music Embassy in Austin as well.

[youtube]https://youtu.be/nOGtfQEo_d0[/youtube]

The Twilight Sad were the final act on the afternoon’s British Music at SXSW showcase, and as frontman James Graham had promised in our earlier interview, their set was heavy on tracks from the band’s latest LP ‘Nobody Wants to Be Here and Nobody Wants to Leave’. They opened with two tracks featured previously here on TGTF, ‘There’s a Girl in the Corner’ and ‘Last January’ before touching on ‘I Became a Prostitute’ from 2009 album ‘Forget the Night Ahead’ and closing their set with the epic sound of ‘And She Would Darken the Memory’ from their 2007 debut ‘Fourteen Autumns and Fifteen Winters’. Though their set here was effective, it did feel quite short and left me wishing for more. Fans of The Twilight Sad will no doubt relish the opportunity to hear longer and more expansive set lists on the band’s upcoming UK tour; find those live dates here.

The Twilight Sad at British Music Embassy 19 March 2015

The British Music Embassy cleared out after The Twilight Sad finished playing, and I had enough time between engagements to meet Mary for a quick dinner before I headed to the historic Driskill Hotel to see singer/songwriter Josh Savage. Mary had recommended Savage to me after seeing him herself at a Sofar Sounds show in Manchester last year, and I’d had his latest EP ‘Spaces’ on repeat in my car during the long road trip to Austin, so I was especially excited to see his only official SXSW showcase on this night.

Josh Savage at the Driskill Hotel 19 March 2015

The Victorian Room at the Driskill was a perfect venue to showcase Savage’s elegant and refined songwriting. While the space might have been intended for standing room only, we in the audience chose to seat ourselves either in the few available chairs or on the floor in front of the stage. The room was very comfortable with good viewpoints all around, and Savage took advantage of the intimate space by telling a few sentimental stories to go along with his tunes and even stepping down off the stage to be closer to his audience.

He further drew us under his spell by asking for our harmonic participation in the chorus of his enchanting ballad ‘Lost in Paris’, and by the end of the set I found myself completely smitten by his graceful songcraft. I was able to sit down with Savage for a brief interview outside the Victorian Room after his show; you can listen to his soft-spoken commentary right here.

Josh Savage at Driskill Hotel 19 March 2015

I had to cut my conversation with Savage shorter than I would have liked so that I could rush back to Latitude 30 to follow up on Dry the River, with whom I had become become acquainted earlier in the week. Stay tuned to TGTF for more coverage of my Thursday night adventures, including Dry the River’s showcase at the British Music Embassy.

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

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