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Deer Shed Festival 2017: Day 2 Roundup

 
By on Tuesday, 1st August 2017 at 2:00 pm
 

Words and photos by Martin Sharman, formerly Head Photographer at TGTF

A rain shower of ferocious but mercifully short intensity awoke all but the most persistent party heads at breakfast time. Saturday is the traditional time when the kids are raring to make a mess and have a party with the smorgasbord of stuff laid on for them, so off we go. There’s crafts galore: painting pots, making milk bottle faces, sewing ra-ra skirts, and creating robot faces out of cardboard boxes. For the little ones, there’s storytelling, and not just your average bedtime effort: this rendition of Bear Hunt ended up in a toddler foam party. Don’t try this at home, kids. Honestly, please don’t. For the older ones, the science tent is where it’s at. There’s countless electronic experiments to take part in, from making basic circuits on cardboard bases, to soldering more complex ones, to taking a screwdriver and a hammer to an enormous pile of obsolete consumer electronics. Music-wise, there was a competition to see who could sing the longest note (I had my eye on the top prize but had to settle for third with 42 seconds), and a multitude of analogue synth and beginners’ DJ classes. The racket from which, as you can imagine, makes the science tent quite an intense experience. Misophonics should steer clear.

Deer Shed 2017

The theme for this year was the Wilderwild, which introduced a completely new area of the festival, devoted to the natural world and humans’ place within it. There was all manner of wild pastimes to have a go at: a stall devoted to a love of hedgehogs, where you could make one out of a pine cone; an actual blacksmith where you could make your own horseshoe in case your steed had lost one; the seemingly innocuous but actually very messy chance to model clay; and a brilliant method of making fire from sticks, which actually works, but is a bit more involved than just rubbing a couple of twigs together. We made a dream catcher. We missed the den building and the live theatre so can only imagine their wondrous delights. In short, what a brilliant and appropriate addition to the festival and one can only hope it becomes a permanent fixture.

Bands-wise, October Drift were impressively active in their morning slot (Teenage Fanclub take note), their proggy songs suddenly jerking into life a bleary early crowd. The Big Moon were brilliant as always and continue the tradition of excellent lady-bands at Deer Shed. Roddy Woomble was the highlight of many people’s weekend with his off-kilter guitar pop.

Happyness at Deer Shed 2017

Stop the press for Happyness. Not satisfied by their performance on Friday night, they were pressed into service for another performance to substitute for a sadly absent booking. And in the flesh they were the best I’ve ever seen. And I’ve seen them a lot. In this writer’s opinion, they are the best art-rock band in the country right now; their offering of surrealist, downtempo art-rock is utterly perfect – there was some involvement of the legs from a high-street window mannekin, and of course scalping Win Butler – they’ve added a keyboard player now but still there is no finer afternoon festival experience than the inscrutable minimalism that is Happyness. They don’t seem that happy but that’s how I end up when I see them. Well done.

The return of Ibibio Sound Machine is a glory to behold. Bringing a flash of African colour to the North Yorkshire countryside, their mere presence is a joyous, uplifting affair – add to that that they play a wonderful mashup of traditional African rhythms, funk, soul, and electro, and further still that singer Eno Williams wears shoulder pads so impressive you could serve Sunday lunch on them, and you have the recipe for a classic Deer Shed appearance. Tea time on Saturday is the musical crescendo of the festival for many: either kids for whom bed isn’t far away, or the parents that have to return to the tent to look after them. To experience such a blast of positivity and extroversion should be the way we all prepare for a decent night’s slumber.

[Those averse to a rant, or are in favour or Ms Kate Tempest should skip the next three paragraphs. You have been warned.]

The worst way to be woken from such repose would be by the awful racket that comes out of Kate Tempest’s mouth, so what better way to drown it out than another droning cacophony: that of a heavy rainstorm atop canvas? Which is exactly what happened. For the exact duration of her set – no shorter, no longer – the heavens gave the site a thorough drenching. Deer Shed themselves reviewed her performance as prophetic. How? Their review was written only the day after. Had anything she prophesied already come true? Did she predict the rain? Does a black cloud follow her around? Or maybe she’s prophetic in the more general sense of being a prophet: a modern-day Chicken Licken who’s come to tell us how awful we all are and how shit the world is. According to the festival, being subjected to “an apocalyptic epic poem about the pain and suffering inflicted on the most deprived members of society” is a fun way to spend a Saturday night, and apparently the pouring rain actually enhanced the experience. The sky is falling! Wicked, man! Blame the Tories!

It’s a truism that one person’s champion of the disenfranchised is another person’s dreary propagandist, and for this writer Kate Tempest falls firmly into the second category. So we have a situation exactly like Billy Bragg in 2015: at least half the festival have NOTHING TO SEE at what should be the climax of the entire weekend. Why Deer Shed should repeat the mistake of headlining a divisive, politically-charged, minimalist solo artist who’s made a career entirely out of invoking leftier-than-thou middle-class guilt at the exact time when everyone should be united in one big pillow of funky togetherness absolutely fails to compute. Moreover, Tempest is a hypocrite of the highest order – she moans about “the gulf that separates us” whilst by her own presence creating that very gulf; she quite shamelessly complains about “ugly words in public spaces” – I couldn’t think of a better way to describe her own perverse, monotone streams of consciousness. I come to festivals for respite from the turbulent political landscape, not to have it thrust before me. I come to festivals to experience beauty and optimism; hers is an ugly, hopeless world. Most importantly, I come to festivals to have fun, and Tempest is no fun at all. The triumphs of Darwin Deez, Johnny Marr and Richard Hawley are but mocking memories.

Apparently the reasoning for the Tempest booking is to attract more “young people” to the festival. Which is deeply patronising and didn’t work out anyway: every person I spoke to, of all ages and shoe sizes, could sum up their opinion of Tempest as “meh”. And is it just me, or are there already more children here than at every other festival in the land? Perhaps by young people they mean young adults, in which case I would have thought that that age have ample choice in the festival market, and to try and attract a group who the vast majority of your usual demographic are paying you good money to avoid, would be something of a mistake. The Big Chill tried that and look what happened to them. The “young adult” that I bumped into who was complaining about losing his block of hashish before promptly consuming most of a discarded and grassy cardboard plate of cold pasta with his bare hands could hardly be called Deer Shed’s target market. Stick to what, and who, you know.

At any rate, the potential disappointment for losing a Saturday headliner was tempered by the fact I didn’t have to get wet listening to them, and that the Obelisk stage actually worked this time. By which I mean the post-Tempest brilliance of Aelfen, who are secretly a heavy metal act disguised as a folk band – they started off innocuously enough, but by the end of their set the tent was rocking. Good stuff. Marc Riley took over for a bit, playing a predictable but nonetheless rewarding set of classic tunes: lots of ‘80s, some Prince, Bowie, et al.

And then – stop the press! – some actual DJing from Manchester-based collective Across the Tracks. Of course you never see real vinyl these days, but these guys were the next best thing, beatmatching like the experts they are, wrangling perfect mixes from the tabled Pioneers. For a while the tent was properly grooving and whooping to a very competent house music set, and finally there was a reason for the “Rave” definition that the programme had so tantalisingly promised. Deer Shed was finally letting its hair down, which is really all we ask of it.

As I left the Obelisk tent, the rain was falling. The ground was slippery mud. Tomorrow could be challenging.

Across the Tracks at Deer Shed

 

Preview: LeeFest 2017

 
By on Thursday, 22nd June 2017 at 11:00 am
 

Of all the smaller festivals that have popped up over recent years, LeeFest (10-12 August in Edenbridge, Kent) is perhaps the best one. Somewhat a mini-Glastonbury-style festival, ‘The Neverland’ as it’s become known, is a place where fun and imagination are encouraged to run wild. Three separate sections are dedicated to different aspects of the lineup, with Skull Ridge being my personal favourite, where the pirates (yes, pirates!) roam free to the sound of punk, rock, grunge and grime. Last year’s lineup, including the surprise Frank Carter & The Rattlesnakes set, was filled with some of the loudest and heaviest new acts around.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J9XwFecNXyU[/youtube]

For those of you who aren’t into the same flavours of music as I, fear not: the full lineup for this year’s LeeFest has some great names from all across the spectrum. Topping the bill this year are two voices who will convey their outlook on current society with their own individual brand of lyrical poetry. Jake Bugg and Kate Tempest, one of the UK’s youngest and brightest songwriters and one of the UK’s most prominent spoken word poets, respectively. With them both at LeeFest, you can’t help but feel like things could get a little bit magical.

Slightly, ok, very away from that spectrum are Wild Beasts, who last year released ‘Boy King’, one of the funkiest and sleaziest – in a good way – honest! – albums we’ve ever heard. It’s amazing, and so are they, and this will be the perfect environment to see them live. LeeFest is a place that prides itself on being a real-life Neverland. You’ve already heard about Skull Ridge and its pirates, but there’s also The Neverwoods aka the main arena, where the Bangarang stage (YES) and Tootles Circus stage take pride of place. Completing the festival’s trio of sections is Mermaid’s Lagoon, or the dance arena, which includes hot tubs. That’s right. Hot tubs.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YTvrv30b7C0[/youtube]

Steering away from hot tubs and mermaids of LeeFest, looking in on the lineup once more and the brightest names in UK music at the moment, and all stand out. Representing indie pop is Fickle Friends who never fail to compose a banger: latest track ‘Glue’ is a testament to this. For rock, Milk Teeth more than hold their own. The foursome are prepping to release a new EP in the coming months and with the incredible work that was their debut, ‘Vile Child’ in 2016, the future is bright for the Gloucestershire-based band. While Jake Bugg may be a well-known name in the songwriting world, a new up-and-comer is Tom Grennan. Against his soulful and often crushing tracks that radiate honesty, his sharply contrasting persona filled with confidence and swagger works incredibly well. You’ll have to catch him live to see what I mean.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMkIIvc-8J0[/youtube]

LeeFest is often likened to being a small, more accessible version of Glastonbury, and all of these claims are accurate. Seeing is believing, so get your tickets quick because the last bunch are on sale and these won’t hang around long. You can still get tier two day tickets, but full weekend tickets are now only available on the final tier. Go here to see all available ticket options at the moment.

You can read my coverage on it last year, including chats with Frank Carter & The Rattlesnakes, Everything Everything and Oscar, through here.

 

Album Review: Kate Tempest – Let Them Eat Chaos

 
By on Thursday, 27th October 2016 at 12:00 pm
 

Kate Tempest Let Them Eat Chaos album coverRapper, poet and playwright Kate Tempest is a force of nature to be reckoned with. In 2013, Tempest won the Ted Hughes Award for new work in poetry, the youngest-ever recipient of the award for her performance piece ‘Brand New Ancients’. She was branded by poet Ian McMillan as someone “who would be leading our national cultural conversations for years to come”. Her sensational first album, 2014’s ‘Everybody Down’, was also nominated for a Mercury Prize. Her latest offering ‘Let Them Eat Chaos’ does exactly that by providing a raw and honest social commentary on modern life.

Similar in nature to her first album, ‘Let Them Eat Chaos’ is also a concept album. She takes us on a compelling journey through the lives of seven fictional characters who are each awake at 4:18 in the morning, and we are introduced to the issues defining their lives. Throughout the album, it is very easy to become involved with each of the characters who, while living separate lives and unknown to each other, are intrinsically linked. Each of the tenants tales are drawn together to create a bigger picture of how issues such migration, drugs and alienation affect us all. Despite being separated by walls, floors and buildings they are all connected by a shared fate. Tempest’s fictional narratives are accompanied by electronic music while lyrically, she seamlessly mixes together rap and performance poetry.

Despite it being a few years since her last musical offering, Tempest was certainly busy in between times. The release of her book ‘The Bricks That Built the Houses’ and her poetry collection ‘Hold Your Own’ meant that although Tempest was not actively creating music, her attentions were not taken away from social conscience. There are several recurring themes throughout the album, especially the prominence of drugs. On tracks such as ‘Ketamine for Breakfast’, we hear the story of Gemma contemplating her younger years that were blighted by drug use. Her lyrics here are emphatic and perhaps contain moments of truth. Rapping “My future is bright, but my past is tryna ruin me” is a devastatingly poignant sentiment of modern life and class divide,. and there is a restlessness and urgency to the chosen rhythm.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ym3iGD7uNn8[/youtube]

In times of such uncertainty, especially for young people in the UK post-Brexit, Tempest’s brutal honesty can be refreshing. Exposing modern truths of gentrification in London, ‘Perfect Coffee’ tells the tale of tenant Zoe as she packs her life into boxes. The reality, where the poorest of communities are being forced out of their homes and council flats are being exploited into million pound rentals, is harrowing: “The squats we used to party in are the flats we can’t afford”. It is a despairing portrayal of what London has become to represent: corrupt with greed, content in alienating the most vulnerable of people.

‘Europe is Lost’ is particularly poignant, with Tempest moving seamlessly through the song with fury. Each topic she touches on is more relevant than the last, speaking about politicians, oil spills and poverty. Barely stopping to take a breath, there is an anger to her delivery with cutting lyrics: “We have learnt nothing from history, the people are dead in their lifetimes dazed by the shine of the streets. Look the traffic is still moving, the system too slick to stop working, business is good. There’s bands every night in the pubs and there is two for one drinks in the clubs and we scrubbed up well “. It is a stark reminder how we, while all aware, choose to ignore what is going on around us in favour of easy and empty living.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TOXXdYtZSbQ[/youtube]

The final song on the album ‘Tunnel Vision’ is a reflective musing by Tempest. The protagonists on each of the songs who were once strangers all become tied together in a shared epiphany of their surroundings. The notion of this album being commercially successful is a hard sell, considering it is an amalgamation of hip-hop and poetry. But the content Tempest is so passionately rapping about is so relevant and relatable. Her writing is extremely provocative and powerful and can stir quite a lot of emotion when listening to it. The album as a whole, then, is truly excellent as both a musical entity and critique of modern society.

8.5/10

‘Let Them Eat Chaos’, Kate Tempest’s second album is out now through Fiction Records. For more of TGTF’s coverage on Tempest, go here.

 

SXSW 2015: Cerdd Cymru : Music Wales showcase at Latitude 30 (Part 2) – 17th March 2015

 
By on Thursday, 26th March 2015 at 4:00 pm
 

Part 1 of my review of the Tuesday night Cerdd Cymru : Music Wales at SXSW 2015, starring Paper Aeroplanes, The People the Poet and East India Youth is here.

Kate Tempest at SXSW 2015, Music Wales

Next up, another 2014 Mercury Prize-nominated artist, but in an entirely different vein. Kate Tempest and her observations on life at its grittiest can stand alone as gripping social commentary in spoken word form, but with Speedy Wunderground label head and producer Dan Carey providing beats to add additional oomph to Tempest’s art, the result is nothing short of brilliant in songs such as the infectious ‘Lonely Daze’ and Steve Lamacq favourite and downbeat mesmeriser ‘Bad Place for a Good Time’. As should be expected, the opinionated Tempest punctuated her set with equally powerful spoken word pieces, reminding all of us to “hold our own” (stay the course and keep your chin up) and to be good to one another with “more empathy, less greed!”

Kate Tempest at SXSW 2015, Music Wales

An aside: Saturday night outside Latitude during the NME/PRS showcase, I found myself stood in the wristband queue with Tempest, Carey and crew and I asked Tempest how she’d been enjoying Austin. She said she’d had a good time but thought it’d been going on for weeks! As she shared a fag with Carey, I commented even with something as simple as sharing fags, the English were more polite with such things. She laughed at this, her blonde curls bouncing at my suggestion; she went on to smile at Carey and excessively called him “love” and “darling” for my benefit. In that moment, I was reminded that despite Tempest’s soaring success, she is like all of us. It gives me hope that the words and love she spreads will serve as inspiration to many.

Shura at SXSW 2015, Music Wales

From one woman, we go to another woman, Manchester’s Shura. If you’re into ‘80s music and New Wave, you can help but think you’ve heard this one before. ‘Indecision’, with its refrain of “you’ve got my love, boy” feels like a throwback to early, lace gloved Madonna, you know, before she thought lesbian kisses and naughty books were de rigueur. You know times have changed when a girl from Manchester comes to SXSW wearing a shirt emblazoned with the Hulk and plays this kind of music, am I right? She also pulled out a cover of Fine Young Cannibals’ ‘She Drives Me Crazy’: not earth-shattering, but interesting enough.

In what would be surely one of the rowdiest, most crowded club shows of SXSW 2015, Catfish and the Bottlemen played under a continuous red light (no Police ‘Roxanne’ jokes, please) to a packed house of fans and industry bods. This makes total sense, given that their UK and North American tours in the first half of 2015 are already sold out, making them a super hot commodity in the business at the moment. Rabid Catfish fans who were likely going to stalk the band all week arrived early to stake their places down the front, while those who arrived not so early grumbled behind them that they were being “rude.” Um, as in all gig situations, you wanna be up front, you get there early, ya dig?

Catfish and the Bottlemen at SXSW 2015, Music Wales

All the hits from their debut album ‘The Balcony’ – ‘Pacifier’, ‘Fallout’, ‘Kathleen’, ‘Cocoon’ – were fired out in rapid succession, with the crowd bouncing to the band’s catchy melodies and frontman Van McCann’s charismatic drawl and yelps. McCann, most likely aware that everyone in Austin was watching them, climbed atop the drum kit at the end, hanging the neck of his guitar precariously off a cable in the ceiling before they left the stage. Truly rock ‘n’ roll, innit?

Last up but certainly not least were Until the Ribbon Breaks, Welsh singer, musician and producer Pete Lawrie-Winfield and his live band. When I saw the now LA-based artist perform and chatted with him last year, I don’t think too many people knew of him or his music. What a difference a year makes: in January, he released debut album ‘A Lesson Unlearnt’, and he’s managed to cement his own fanbase while touring as support for the likes of London Grammar and Run the Jewels (who appear on ‘Revolution Indifference’.

Until the Ribbon Breaks at SXSW 2015, Music Wales

Hearing women behind me howl with delight over his sexy delivery of ‘A Taste of Silver’ and beat-heavy yet passionate ‘Pressure’ was incredible validation of what I already knew in 2014. I think sometimes people forget how important production is and what a talent triple threat artists (those who can sing, play instruments and produce) really are.

 

Preview: 6 Music Festival 2015

 
By on Wednesday, 28th January 2015 at 9:00 am
 

The 6 Music Festival is back! And it’s coming to my town. For two evenings in February, the coolest place for a music lover to be is Gateshead: the Sage Gateshead on the iconic Newcastle/Gateshead quayside, to be precise. Newcastle gets to kick off the event on the Friday night, hosting an opening party at the O2 Academy, the lineup for which is impressive indeed: Interpol, Mogwai, Sleater-Kinney’s first UK performance for 10 years, and the winner of 6 Music’s album of the year, The War on Drugs. Tickets for this will set you back a mere £25, and considering the bill is essentially four headline-worthy performances, that’s impeccable value. The venue capacity is 2,000, and there’s only 1,800 tickets on offer, so all those lucky enough to procure a ticket will get a decent view.

The whole shebang then moves (just) south of the river to the hip and happening borough of Gateshead, which, as everyone in the know has known for a while now, is a far superior place to live and party than its more famous little brother Newcastle. It’s all happening at the iconic Sage, into which the powers that be are managing to cram four performance spaces into its voluptuous, snail-like curves. I’ll give an alphabetised list at the end of this article, but this writer’s picks of the Saturday night are: Kate Tempest and Eliza Carthy, who will bring two stylistically dissimilar but familiarly connected strands of English folk music together in a unique, and uniquely powerful performance; Gruff Rhys, whose latest project American Interior, documenting Welsh explorer John Evans’ epic journey across the eponymous landscape, will surely feature highly; and The Cribs, whose stamina and endurance are second to none, and are still turning out music worthy of a catalogue which extends back more than a decade.

Readers’ attention must be alerted to the capacity of the Sage, compared with the number of tickets sold, so they are prepared what they might get for their money. The Sage is essentially a shell within which two separate auditoria exist: the stunning all-seated Hall One (capacity 1,640), and the much smaller, less formal, standing Hall Two (capacity 400). There’s also a small room called the Northern Rock Foundation Hall, capacity 250. Eagle-eyed readers will have noticed that this is a total capacity of 2290, but ticket sales are set at 3,400 – the capacity of the entire building, not just the auditoria. Apparently the concourse will absorb the overspill, which means over 1,000 people milling about outside trying to get to see the show of their choice, although there will be 6 Music DJs on the concourse as well. Just to reiterate, if every ticket holder wishes to see the big headline performance in the main room, less than half will be able to do so. I am prepared to stand corrected on my numbers, but if I’m right I can see trouble, and overcrowding, ahead. The Sage are notoriously uptight about rules – this isn’t your usual free-and-easy gig venue – so expect short shrift from the stewards if the room is at capacity. Also expect white-collar drinks prices, and with a no readmittance policy, it could turn out to be an expensive evening, with no guarantee of seeing the show of one’s choice, albeit with all the falafel wraps one can eat. Caveat emptor.

As long as post-festival drinks didn’t go on too late at the superb Central Bar across the road from the Sage, Sunday dawns with yet another superb lineup of acts, with a flavour not unlike a Glastonbury Sunday: more left-field choices, perhaps established acts that need a bit of a boost. In that vein, picks from Sunday include the vintage post-punk outfit Wire and the vintage post-soul diva Neneh Cherry. Gaz Coombes will bring the newest of his superb solo work, and Public Service Broadcasting will reveal the direction they’ve chosen for album number two.

In summary, this is an impeccable list of acts for what promises to be an exciting weekend on Tyneside. I haven’t even touched on the 6 Music By Day strand, which is to run in Newcastle’s creative hub, the Ouseburn valley, and include interviews by 6 Music presenters with the musicians who are playing later, performances from bands local to the North East, and a record fair. Our cup runneth over! Given the fact that it’s all only 10 minutes on the bus from my front door, I personally couldn’t be happier. Anyone for an after party?

Bands performing at The 02 Academy Newcastle on Friday 20 February from 5 PM:
– Interpol
– Mogwai, celebrating their 20th anniversary this year
– Sleater-Kinney, their first UK performance in almost 10 years
– The War On Drugs, BRIT 2015 nominees whose 2014 album ‘Lost in the Dream’ was 6 Music’s Album of the Year in 2014

Artists and bands performing at The Sage Gateshead across four stages on Saturday 21 February from 6 PM:
– Hot Chip, performing exclusive brand new material for the first time
– Royal Blood, Mercury Prize 2014 and BRIT 2015 nominees
– The Fall
– Jungle, Mercury Prize 2014 nominees
– Maximo Park, local North East heroes
– Kate Tempest, Mercury Prize 2014 nominee
– Gruff Rhys
– Simian Mobile Disco
– Django Django, performing exclusive new material
– Father John Misty
– Ghostpoet, performing brand new material
– The Cribs, performing brand new material
– Villagers, performing exclusive brand new material for the first time
– Ibibio Sound Machine
– Kate Tempest and Eliza Carthy: performing together in an exclusive 6 Music collaboration
– A Northern Soul Night (from 5-10.30 PM), hosted by 6 Music’s Funk and Soul show presenter Craig Charles, with Richard Searling and Stuart Maconie plus further DJs to be announced soon.

Artists and bands performing at The Sage Gateshead across four stages on Sunday 22 February from 6 PM:
– The Charlatans: performing exclusive brand new material
– Jamie T
– Neneh Cherry
– Jon Hopkins
– British Sea Power
– Gaz Coombes
– Young Fathers, Mercury 2014 winners
– Wire
– The Maccabees, performing exclusive new material
– Glass Animals
– Lonelady, performing brand new material
– King Creosote
– Public Service Broadcasting, performing brand new material
– Unknown Mortal Orchestra, performing brand new material
– Additional DJ sets (from 5-10.30 PM), hosted by 6 Music presenter Nemone, with Richy Ahmed, Daniel Avery, 6 Mix residents Rob da Bank and DJ Yoda, and others to be announced soon.

Tickets for each night of the festival will go on sale at 10 AM across 3 consecutive days: tickets for Friday go on sale on Friday 30 January, priced £25 plus fees; tickets for Saturday 21 February go on sale on Saturday 31 January, priced £35 plus fees; and tickets for Sunday 22 February go on sale on Sunday 1 February, priced £35 plus fees. For more information on the event in Newcastle, visit the BBC 6music Web site. Information on the festival by day will be announced on BBC 6music on Tuesday 3 February.

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

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