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Video of the Moment #2333: Juveniles

 
By on Tuesday, 4th April 2017 at 6:00 pm
 

Far too often these days, the story of a band ends in dissolution and breakup. So when I heard Juveniles from France still existed, it filled me with so much hope. At my first Great Escape in 2012, I saw the act play at the basement of Komedia. Juveniles is now the solo act of Jean Sylvain, with some help from producer Joakim Bouaziz. Things were a bit crazy while we were away for SXSW 2017, so we missed the release of Juveniles’ latest album ‘Without Warning’.

But we’re going to try and make up for that by introducing you to the music video for ‘Someone Better’, taken from the brand new LP. The song is super funky: hell-o, massive bass beats! In the video, Sylvain serves as the director of another music video (it’s not as confusing as it sounds, really), and as has been repeated many times in popular music, sometimes it’s all about just one touch. The script blurs with reality, with what was supposed to happen with the actors instead translates to some of the crew. Watch the video for ‘Someone Better’ below; you can get Juveniles’ album ‘Without Warning’ from Paradis/Capitol Records. To take a look back at Juveniles’ former forms, read our past coverage on the act through here.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ys4jwYv4Oqk[/youtube]

 

MP3(s) of the Day #766: Juveniles

 
By on Wednesday, 3rd July 2013 at 10:00 am
 

I had to wait until last weekend to post Juveniles‘ latest video for upcoming single ‘Fantasy’ because of its NSFW content. Far less salacious is the French electro duo’s offer of a free EP featuring four remixes of ‘Fantasy’. Get it from their Facebook here.

 

Video of the Moment #1241: Juveniles

 
By on Saturday, 29th June 2013 at 10:00 am
 

It’s a good thing that I really like the music of Rennes, France electropop duo Juveniles because otherwise I wouldn’t have posted this NSFW video for ‘Fantasy’, their next single. I guess every man’s fantasy involves women snogging each other, and another one with pasties? (And I’m not talking about the Cornish kind. And I’m no ultra feminist either, but…groan.)

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3j6W3IWzsk[/youtube]

 

Video of the Moment (and more!) #1158: Juveniles

 
By on Monday, 25th March 2013 at 6:00 pm
 

French electropoppers Juveniles have been busy since we last caught up with them at the Great Escape last year and in summer 2012. They’ve been bonding on tour like whoa and now they have a new video for their single ‘Strangers’. Watch it below. Or if you’re suffering like I am in America, you can hear the original song and some related remixes by Jupiter and Le Crayon below the YouTube embed.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YjdHeeM4DSA[/youtube]

 

Video of the Moment #861: Juveniles

 
By on Friday, 29th June 2012 at 6:00 pm
 

Rennes, France electropop act Juveniles‘ have a self-titled EP out now with six tracks, including the one featured in this video, ‘Through the Night’. With what seems to be the theme du jour in light of the summer Olympics just weeks away, this one has an athletic bent. Watch it below.

I saw them live at this year’s Great Escape; read all about their afternoon show at Komedia downstairs in my day 3 festival roundup.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exFWnnb0Tpg[/youtube]

 

Great Escape 2012: Day 3 Afternoon Roundup – 12th May 2012

 
By on Wednesday, 30th May 2012 at 2:00 pm
 

Being at the Great Escape can be surreal: wending your way through crowds; down unknown cobblestoned lanes, only to find yourself at a dead end; drinking to be sociable and to have fun but not drinking too much that you won’t remember anything the next day, for you have know you have to come up with not just intelligible but thought-provoking reviews. So there’s nothing like a bit of Real Life to put you squarely back in the present. As I was getting ready to take on Great Escape Day 3, I was stopped by a phone call from reception saying she had arrived.

My spot of Real Life was provided by my good friend Jennie; we are and have been sisters in the Duran Duran fandom for years. Obviously (but unlike most of the Guardian’s readership it appears), we are both chuffed that Duran Duran were chosen to play at this summer’s London Olympic Games. Jennie often reads my Facebook page for a laugh, if only to bemoan that she knows nothing about the ‘indie’ bands that fill up my time and cause my heart to go a-flutter. I explain to her that I’m going to see a band from Sheffield in mere hours, following that with an interview, and all my insides have gone to mush, because I’ve had an ostensible band crush on them the first time Steve Lamacq gave their first single a spin on his Radio1 programme. (And that would be quite a while ago, since as you remember, Radio1 stupidly gave Lammo and his ‘In New Music We Trust’ show the boot in summer 2009.)

This is all happening while we’re watching her daughter, now talking and walking yet very bashful around ‘Auntie Mary’, playing around in this giant sandbox Brighton has down by the seafront. I can see now why Brighton is a kid’s paradise; the world’s your oyster when you’re playing in the sandbox, innit? It’s kind of sobering, stood there watching kids play and being kids, accepting this isn’t the life you’ve chosen. Reunions in my circle of schoolfriends now include everyone wanting to see my holiday snaps from England or wherever else I’ve been, everyone gawking, “that must be nice, to go on vacation whenever you want. You can’t do that…when you’ve got kids.” I’m not sure how or if I’m supposed to answer. Part of living life is coping with the hand you’re dealt. That’s how it’s been with me. On the other hand, sometimes I want to say to these people, “you chose that life.” And I chose this life. And music.

But before we risk falling into an entire post philosophising, you might be wondering which band I was referring to. And that would be the Crookes. It seems everyone else I knew who liked them had already seen them loads of times. Even a close mate’s band went on an entire tour with them. So I gave my goodbyes to my dear friend and her dear little sprog to queue early outside the Hope. As happened all weekend, a simple question of, “which is the right queue for delegates?” was met with a smarmy answer: “Pick one. Maybe you’ll be lucky.” I held my tongue in and hoped for the best with the right-hand queue. But I can tell you, there was about as much order as a queue to board an Amtrak train in Washington bound for New York. I got there early, and once they let us go inside to form a queue, I was #3 in line. And I was not going to be cut in front of by girls who showed up late and started their own queue parallel to ours. (For the record, they tried, but I ran – I mean ran – so I was practically stepping on the shoes of the bloke in the queue in front of me. A thousand apologies, dude. But desperate times call for desperate measures.)

I looked behind me, hearing American accents and thinking I’d get some back up in this regard; when I tried to exchange pleasantries with the couple, I was disappointed that they sounded snobby. And entitled. “We come every year.” I kind of gathered this by the tone and their badges, which in hindsight I probably should have examined more closely but I didn’t feel like bothering, as I had it in my head that they were just posh punters. As you can probably imagine, I didn’t run into too many Americans at either music festival I attended, and the Americans I knew and spent time with are all involved in music blogging or PR, so they’re all lovely people. Anyone else, though, was a different story. I hate thinking this is the way we look to everyone else at music festivals abroad. No-one should swan into these situations thinking they’re better than everyone else simply because of their nationality. Dear me. Maybe offering up those fish and chips the other night at the Queens Hotel gave me good karma? All I know is that the quickest way to alienate yourself in a new and potentially uncomfortable situation is acting all holier-than-thou…

So after practically running over Punter #2, it was up the stairs and into the performance space. Whoa. The Hope is tiny, with room for about 100, and that’s shoe-horning them in. For my first Crookes appearance, I couldn’t have hoped for a more intimate experience. They were a late addition to the Great Escape, so I could hardly believe my luck. Glad I arrived early…

While I organised myself with notepad and cameras, I said hello to singer/bassist George Waites and explained I was from America. Poor guy, I think I may have given him a whole load of anxiety playing for someone who’d come all that way to see them. (Sorry George! Geez, I’m already apologizing all over on this Saturday, aren’t I?) They started with ‘Chorus of Fools’, a track off their 2011 Fierce Panda debut ‘Chasing After Ghosts’. “You and me / were fated to be / so damn blue”: I remember hearing these words and thinking they were some of the saddest lyrics I’d ever heard. Yet in the confines of a herky jerky, animated set by the Crookes, there was no sorrow to be had. The stage, which of course was just as tiny as the ‘club’ area was, buzzed with life as arms, limbs and guitars went flying as they were played (mostly) with reckless abandon.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rcwf_VnXNHM[/youtube]

Newer singles ‘American Girls’ (dedicated to the memory of the girls they met last year on their SXSW sojourn; watch it above) and ‘Afterglow’ sounded wonderful. So did songs on from their debut EP ‘Dreams of Another Day’, released in autumn 2010, which seems like a lifetime ago, yet still sound amazing, like ‘Backstreet Lovers’. Waites explained to me later in the sunshine that they were sat in someone’s car after lecture when Lammo spun the song the first time and how unbelievably weird and exciting that was. They’ve got a new album out this summer called ‘Hold Fast’ but you can hear them talk more about it in this interview I posted last week.

After the Crookes, I changed gears and headed over to Komedia. I should have paid better attention to the signs for upstairs, downstairs and the studio bar, because later that night, I didn’t know where I was going and it probably would have helped to have a better nose for navigation. My purpose: I was going to catch the only Juveniles set that didn’t have conflicts with any other band on my list. I’ve seen so many Kitsune bands, it made sense to go see this band before they blew up like La Roux, Delphic and Two Door Cinema Club, if only to be able to say, “I saw them at the 2012 Great Escape. In a basement. Neener neener!”

I have no idea who writes the blurbs in the Great Escape booklet but the claim that the band 22 “describe themselves as ‘an instructional guide to spiritual enlightenment, harmonic individuality and universal transcendence’” would make me believe I was about to see a Norwegian Enya. I’d describe it more like thrashy, metal prog from Trondheim, Norway. This generally is not my thing, but I have to say, with their wireless guitars, band members jumped down from the stage to the wooden floor of Komedia downstairs, axes blazing. It is sure more fun watching prog rockers leaping all over the place than standing still on the stage, concentrating on their chords.

After all of 22’s gear was sorted and removed from stage (and they left with the audience cheering for them, I might add), then came Juveniles and their stage setup. It is clear from hearing ‘Ambitions’, the hugely dancey song of theirs featured on Kitsune Parisien II released in February, that this band likes synths. So it’s no surprise to see not just one but two major synth setups onstage. However, this is not to say that they didn’t have the opportunity to eschew the synths for a moment and play guitars instead and bring out the funk, such as in ‘Blackout’ video below.

They’re the perfect blend of Two Door Cinema Club (melodic and infectious tunes) and Holy Ghost! (funky disco) and given the right and continual promotion by Kitsune, they could be the next big thing in dance / electropop. Watch this space.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkijQZnm9SA[/youtube]

You will probably not believe how I spent the rest of my afternoon. I set up shop in the now deserted press centre, borrowing a staff laptop to catch up on email and shore up the loose ends for our stage the following Friday at Liverpool Sound City. Disappointingly, I found out my last chance for a Dome show would not happen; Reverend and the Makers cancelled as Jon McClure was unable to sing. Yet again in Brighton I was forced to change course, but you’ll read my further frustrations in the next installment.

I also met a Wireimage photographer from Portsmouth and saw the AU Review guys again, before I ducked outside to see Simon Price of the Independent and his red ‘horns’ presiding over the celebrity front table during John Robb’s pub quiz. (It would not be the last time I’d see Mr. Robb but that’s for another city and another post…) And it must sound really strange that I was waiting for a NYC PR friend of mine there, as we’d never met before. But that’s something that surely can be said about the Great Escape: be prepared for the unexpected…

 
 
 

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There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF was edited by Mary Chang, based in Washington, DC.

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