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Live Review: IDLES at Dublin Button Factory – 22nd October 2018

 
By on Thursday, 8th November 2018 at 2:00 pm
 

Words by Gareth O’Malley

IDLES didn’t make it over here last time they were touring an album, which is why tonight’s set feels like an overdue celebration of last year as much as it does for their breakthrough record ‘Joy as an Act of Resistance’. The floodgates open not long after support act Heavy Lungs leave the stage. By the time IDLES arrive on the scene just after 9 PM and open their set with ‘Colossus’, anticipation has reached a fever pitch. The song’s first act is delivered at a pace that seems funereal compared to its recorded counterpart. Then, frontman Joe Talbot counts the five-piece back in for part two and the room finally ignites, the first few rows of the crowd on the floor seeming to move as one. It’s the sort of energetic release the band excel at, setting the bar for what is to come.

‘Colossus’ and ‘Never Fight a Man With a Perm’ are the opening salvo of a 19-song set, quickly followed by the politically-charged ‘Mother’ and ‘Faith in the City’ from ‘Brutalism’. Stage banter is kept to a minimum until the band are sure they have everyone in the room on side. “Are there any scumbags in the audience?” Talbot asks cheekily. A resounding cheer goes up by way of answer before he dedicates the next song to them. It is, of course, ‘I’m Scum’, and by the sounds of things, there are plenty of people here who are “lefty, soft, minimum wage job” as the song puts it. ‘Danny Nedelko’ is dedicated by Talbot to “those people here who are not from here, those immigrants that make the world a better place” before the band tear through the song and are almost drowned out by the crowd in the process. Five mics on stage struggle to compete with a thousand-strong crowd roaring back a song that has seemingly come to mean a lot to people in a very short time.

Everyone in the room seems to have brought their best selves to tonight’s show, with Ireland praised for its selection of ‘really good Dairy Milk’ by Talbot before powerhouse drummer Jon Beavis introduces the deliberately overblown ‘Gram Rock’, a song memorably described as being about “two hedge fund managers doing coke at a funeral”. The motorik grooves and punishing walls of sound of ‘Heel/Heal’, meanwhile, are dedicated to local band Fontaines D.C., with Talbot effusive in his praise of whom he calls ‘the best fucking band in the world’. Evidently, some people were listening, as their own show here next month has since sold out. [It has been announced this week that Fontaines D.C. will be joining IDLES on their North American headline tour next May. – Ed.]

The show rolls along at a clip, with fans as open to the band’s message as they are the musical content. ‘Samaritans’ is introduced as “a song that wants to encourage men to talk about their feelings” before Talbot extends gratitude toward the heaving crowd: “Thank you for allowing us to share our message with you.” The song itself is delivered at a pace significantly slower than the album version, but still goes down a storm.

‘Television’ receives one of the best responses of the night, picking things back up as we head into the closing moments of the set. Things get slightly out of hand on ‘Exeter’, with Talbot all but derailed midway through the song by the sheer amount of bodies on stage. He runs with it, though, and the stage invasion generates enough energy to get through the rest of the set. One stage invader gifts Talbot a scarf (“for those cold Irish nights”, he says, though it’s probably serving him well in Europe) and is then surfed back on to the stage no less than three separate times during their cover of Solomon Burke’s ‘Cry to Me’.

The room is treated to a brief a capella cover of Mariah Carey’s ‘All I Want For Christmas is You’ before the set is brought to a close with a frantic rendition of ‘Well Done’ and their traditional set closer ‘Rottweiler’ (“It’s about the horrific right-wing press in the UK … Don’t read the Sun, it’ll give you cancer”). Before they bring the curtain down on their debut Irish headline show in authoritative fashion, Talbot reveals that they’re planning a return visit to these shores sometime in the new year.

No encores, of course – ‘we don’t do them because it’s weird’ – but considering how much of themselves they leave on the stage, they can close shows however they see fit. This might have been somewhat overdue, but it turns out to be well worth the wait. The scramble for tickets for that forthcoming show is going to be brutal.

 

Album Review: IDLES – Joy as an Act of Resistance

 
By on Monday, 22nd October 2018 at 12:00 pm
 

We had a busy summer and missed reviewing IDLES‘ second album. Happily, we have new writer Gareth O’Malley stepping in and rectifying the situation. His words follow.

IDLES Joy as an Act of Resistance album cover>Bristol-based punks IDLES could have been forgiven for taking some time off after they finished touring ‘Brutalism’, their incendiary debut album, but the quintet had other ideas. Chief among them was heading right back into the studio and putting together its successor. That ‘Joy as an Act of Resistance’ came together as quickly as it did shouldn’t be surprising, given how the band have become known for throwing themselves into a tough tour schedule in recent years. They’ve made up for lost time – no more 3-year gaps between releases like what happened with their 2012 debut EP ‘Welcome’ and its 2015 follow-up ‘Meat’ – and have no plans to slow down any time soon.

That sense of urgency is also a key part of their sound: up-tempo, riff-heavy material matched in its intensity by firebrand frontman Joe Talbot’s emotional lyrical bent, delivered in a full-throated roar. There’s little room to breathe across this LP’s 12 tracks. Though the record is by turns both personal and political, it’s pretty full-on throughout. Even its softest song, ‘June’, is a heartbreaking eulogy for Talbot’s stillborn child, an unflinching look at an episode of personal devastation and grief. Among the many topics it tackles are mental health, xenophobia, violence, classism and above all, self-acceptance. “If someone talked to you the way you do to you / I’d put their teeth through / Love yourself!” Talbot yells encouragingly on ‘Television’, a song that shouts down unrealistic beauty standards and the effect they can have on self-esteem.

That track pairs well with the ferocious ‘Samaritans’, whose own message of self-love is delivered as a call for men to cast aside the mask of masculinity worn by previous generations (“This is why you never see your father cry”) and express their emotions instead of bottling everything up. Driven by a powerhouse performance from drummer Jon Beavis, it’s a rallying cry for a society – and the music industry – blighted by a rise in male suicides. Fighting to end the stigma around mental health issues, the band also contribute their take on American preacher and soul singer Solomon Burke’s ‘Cry to Me’ as the record’s penultimate track. The justice they do to it, you’d think it’s an IDLES original unless told otherwise. It allows the listener some downtime before the band bring the album to a clattering halt with the anarchic ‘Rottweiler’, a growler of a track that predates even ‘Brutalism’ but makes an ideal closing track.

They certainly know how to bookend their albums; in terms of sheer energy, ‘Rottweiler’ is matched, perhaps even bettered by the two-part cinematic opener and obvious live favourite ‘Colossus’, which builds steadily over 3 minutes before coming to a halt. This is the calm before Beavis counts the band back in, the song erupting into a chaotic shout-along with some of the album’s most quotable lyrics. All together now: “I’m like Stone Cold Steve Austin / I put homophobes in coffins / I’m like Fred Astaire / I dance like I don’t ca-yerrrrre” (emphasis theirs, not ours). Combined with the cathartic heaviness of ‘Never Fight a Man With a Perm’, these two tracks generate enough energy to power a mid-sized town.

Elsewhere, the band extol the virtues of immigrant workers and c-o-m-m-u-n-i-t-y on ‘Danny Nedelko’,named for the frontman of Bristolian buds Heavy Lungs, whom have since returned the favour), blast Brexiteers on ‘Great’ and take themselves down a peg while simultaneously lampooning those who might take issue with their left-leaning politics on the self-effacing ‘I’m Scum’. Even ‘Love Song’ takes the age-old view of romance and turns it on its head with a dose of white-knuckle noise rock. Across the 42 minutes of ‘Joy as an Act of Resistance’, a lot of ground is covered, and you might need time to take it all in afterward. But you’ll be glad you did because it is, hands down, the most vital rock record of the year. You might have missed out on ‘Brutalism’, but don’t miss out on this one.

9/10

Bristol punks IDLES’ sophomore album ‘Joy as an Act of Resistance’ is out now on Partisan Records. For more of our articles here on TGTF on IDLES, follow this link.

 

The Great Escape 2018 Preview: editor Mary’s best band bets

 
By on Tuesday, 8th May 2018 at 11:00 am
 

Please note: as we always recommend in all of TGTF’s festival previews, the information we post here on The Great Escape 2018 taking place next week is current at the time of posting. We strongly encourage you to check in at the festival’s official Web site closer to the start of the event to confirm venues and set times. Three-day wristbands for the event in Brighton 17-19 May are still available at the price of £70 plus handling if purchased online; delegate passes that include both access to the daytime industry convention and all music showcases are available at the price of £275 plus handling. More information on where you can purchase your tickets in person or online is available from The Great Escape official Web site. If you’d like to read my previous, more general preview of The Great Escape, it’s through here.

As mentioned in part 1 of my Live at Leeds best bets preview, and alluded to in part 2 as well, there are quite a few acts that appeared this past weekend at Live at Leeds and/or Liverpool Sound City that will also be appearing next week at the Great Escape in Brighton.

Bad Sounds (Friday 11:15 PM, Horatio’s)
Black Futures (Thursday, 9:15 PM, Green Door Store)
Boy Azooga (Thursday, 12:00 PM, Latest Music Bar; 2:00 PM, Dr. Martens stage; 9:15 PM, Patterns upstairs)
Cassia (Friday, 12:45 AM, The Hope and Ruin)
Hollow Coves (Thursday, 12:45 PM, Komedia Studio Bar and 10:15 PM, The Old Courtroom)
Knightstown (Saturday, 12:15 PM, One Church)
Lady Bird (Friday, 2:15 PM, Dr. Martens stage and 10:15 PM, The Walrus)
Rascalton (Thursday, 1:00 PM, Horatio’s [Showcasing Scotland stage]; Friday, 10:15 PM, Green Door Store)
SHEAFS (Saturday, 8:45 PM, The Hope and Ruin)
The Ninth Wave (Thursday, 3:30 PM, Horatio’s [Showcasing Scotland stage]; Friday, 9:30 PM, The Haunt; Saturday, 10:15 PM, Marine Room [Harbour Hotel])
The Orielles (Thursday, 2:30 PM, Beach House and 9:00 PM, Horatio’s)
Tors (Friday, 6:45 PM, St. Mary’s Church)
Vistas (Saturday, 2:30 PM, The Hope and Ruin)
whenyoung (Thursday, 6:30 PM, The Haunt)
Zapatilla (Thursday, 10:15 PM, The Walrus)

SXSW 2018 (or earlier) alums: Here’s a list of artists we either saw in March in Austin (or even in previous years) who we enjoyed AND/OR we previewed ahead of the festival -AND- will also be appearing at the Great Escape. They’re sorted by alphabetical order, as some of the acts who are bigger draws are appearing more than once, so organising the list by first appearance may not necessarily be useful to you.

All Our Exes Live in Texas (Thursday, 12:10 PM, Komedia [Aussie BBQ stage]; Thursday, 10:15 PM, Latest Music Bar)
Dermot Kennedy (Thursday, 9:00 PM, Wagner Hall; Friday, 4:00 PM, Beach Club; Friday, 10:00 PM, Sallis Benney Theatre)
Dream Wife (Thursday, 8:45 PM, Beach Club)
Her’s (Friday, 1:00 PM, Beach House; Friday, 10:15 PM, Horatio’s)
IDLES (Thursday 10:00 PM, Beach Club)
Jealous of the Birds (Thursday, 9:15 PM, Bau Wow; Friday, 2:00 PM, Jubilee Square)
Jerry Williams (Thursday, 7:45 PM, Hope and Ruin; Saturday, 12:30 PM, Komedia Studio Bar)
Joshua Burnside (Friday, 1:30 PM, Sticky Mike’s Frog Bar [Output Belfast stage]; Saturday, 12:15 PM, Latest Music Bar)
Let’s Eat Grandma (Friday, 9:15 PM, The Old Market)
Lo Moon (Friday, 8:30 PM, Coalition)
Mansionair (Thursday, 9:15 PM, Komedia)
ONR (Friday, 8:30 PM, Paganini Ballroom at the Old Ship Hotel [BBC Introducing stage])
Pale Waves (Thursday, 7:00 PM, Wagner Hall; Thursday, 11:00 PM, Horatio’s)
Rachel K Collier (Friday, 12:20 PM, Latest Music Bar [Horizons / Gorwelion showcase)
Sam Fender (Friday, 2:30 PM, Patterns upstairs; Friday, 8:00 PM, Sallis Benney Theatre; Saturday, 1:30 PM, Komedia Studio Bar)
Stella Donnelly (Thursday, 8:15 PM, Komedia; Friday, 7:45 PM, Unitarian Church; Saturday, 1:20 PM, Dr. Martens stage)
Superorganism (Friday, 10:15 PM, The Old Market)
Ten Tonnes (Friday, 6:30 PM, Coalition; Friday, 10:45 PM, Paginini Ballroom at the Old Ship Hotel [BBC Introducing stage])
The Homesick (Friday, 2:30 PM, Komedia Studio Bar; Saturday, 10:15 PM, Green Door Store)
The Spook School (Thursday, 12:15 PM, Horatio’s [Showcasing Scotland stage]; Saturday, 8:30 PM Sticky Mike’s Frog Bar)
TOUTS (Thursday, 8:15 PM, Patterns upstairs; Friday, 3:30 PM, Sticky Mike’s Frog Bar)

::gasps:: Okay, so now that we’ve gotten all those shining stars with loads of potential out of the way, I’m going to focus on five additional acts in this post. I’ve chosen those from the pool of acts appearing at The Great Escape but who did not appear at Live at Leeds last Saturday.

Basement Revolver (indie rock / lo-fi; Hamilton, Canada; 2:15 PM, Green Door Store; 6:15 PM, Patterns upstairs)
One of the upshots of attending The Great Escape is that it has arguably the most international line-up of any emerging music festival in the UK. Female-fronted Basement Revolver is one of a handful of acts having travelled thousands of miles to Brighton, besides the Aussies, of course. Bringing their reverb-heavy guitar chords and the sweet voice of Chrisy Hurn, they’ll have two chances on Thursday to wow Brighton crowds.

CRIMER (synthpop / dance; Switzerland; Thursday, 10:15 PM, Bau Wow; Friday, 1:30 PM, Bau Wow)
You a fan of Depeche Mode’s beats and Dave Gahan’s sultry drawl? I’m gonna put it out there and say you’re gonna love CRIMER from the Continent. The Great Escape blurb presumably supplied by him describes his look as pure boyband, but don’t let his hair parting put you off. Seems a bit strange that they have him on early Friday afternoon (I’d suggest you see him on the Thursday night instead) but hey, maybe he can turn Bau Wow into a sweaty disco before the 2 o’clock hour. Wait and see!

Declan Welsh and the Decadent West (punk; Glasgow; Friday, 12:30 PM, One Church and 7:15 PM, Green Door Store; 9:15 PM, Marine Room [Harbour Hotel])
I think it’s come time in this list to bring in something more subversive. I guess I don’t think of Glasgow as being very punk: perhaps it’s because both times I’ve visited, everyone’s been super nice to me, including the very large man with a very large ginger beard who shared a table with me at Nice and Sleazys. But I digress. Quoting their TGE bio directly, “Donald Trump and Theresa May watch out! The Revolution will be well dressed and speaking in Glaswegian.” RAWR.

Franc Moody (funk / dance; London; Friday, 2:40 PM, Beach House)
Not a guy from France, phew! No, Franc Moody is a London collective bringing da funk and da dance to Brighton’s seaside. Apparently they have been doing this for a while, in so-called ‘infamous’ (::giggles thinking of Three Amigos:: ) warehouse parties in Tottenham. Friday afternoon at TGE is oddly full of dance acts, so I can only hope that no matter what the weather, Franc Moody (and everyone else for that matter) can manage to get bodies bumpin’ before official wine o’clock.

Saint Raymond (pop; Nottingham; Thursday, 3:30 PM, Marine Room [Harbour Hotel])
This singer/songwriter has already been out on the road with the likes of Gabrielle Aplin, Ed Sheeran and HAIM, so it shouldn’t come as much surprise that Callum Burrows’ style of music is firmly in the pop genre. Burrows blends a synth-driven ‘80s sound with feel good pop lyrics. Apparently in the early days back home in Notts, lazy journos compared him to local acts Jake Bugg and Dog is Dead. No more.

 

Live at Leeds 2018 Preview: editor Mary’s best band bets (part 1)

 
By on Monday, 30th April 2018 at 11:00 am
 

This year’s Live at Leeds 2018 best bets preview will be longer than past years because a lot of the acts (more than in past years, I reckon!) will also appear at Liverpool Sound City or The Great Escape, or both. As a result, I listened to ever band on the Live at Leeds schedule, then cross-referenced the lists so you, the music discoverer, can find them at another event if applicable. The Great Escape will take place in Brighton in 2 weeks’ time, and I am planning to post a Great Escape-specific best bets that will pick up anyone exemplary that I wouldn’t have written about here if they aren’t appearing in Leeds. Hope that all makes sense! If you’d like to read my previous, more general preview on Live at Leeds 2018, follow this link.

Please note: as we always recommend in all of TGTF’s festival previews, the information we post here on Live at Leeds 2018 is current at the time of posting. We strongly encourage you to check in at the Live at Leeds 2018 official Web site closer to the start of the event to confirm venues and set times. Wristbands for the event in Leeds this Saturday, the 5th of May are still available at the bargain price of £36 plus handling if purchased online; early bird and VIP tickets are now sold out. More information on where you can purchase your tickets in person or online is available here.

SXSW 2018 (or earlier) alums: Here’s a list of artists we either saw last month in Austin (or even in previous years) who we enjoyed AND/OR we previewed ahead of the festival -AND- will also be appearing at Live at Leeds this coming Saturday. For your convenience, I’ve listed them in order of appearance on the day so you can slot them into your growing schedule.

IDLES (12:00 PM, Wardrobe [Dr. Martens stage])
Superorganism (2:45 PM, Stylus [The Independent stage])
ONR (5:00 PM, Lending Room)
The RPMs (5:00 PM, A Nation of Shopkeepers [Too Many Blogs stage])
Dermot Kennedy (6:00 PM, Academy [Leeds Festival stage])
Sam Fender (6:15 PM, Stylus [The Independent stage])
Stella Donnelly (7:00 PM, Brudenell Social Club [DIY stage])
TOUTS (7:00 PM, A Nation of Shopkeepers [Too Many Blogs stage])
Fizzy Blood (7:15 PM, Key Club)
Spring King (7:15 PM, Leeds Beckett main stage)
Ten Tonnes (7:30 PM, Leeds Church, Dork stage)
Yak (8:30 PM, Wardrobe [Dr. Martens stage])
Blaenavon (8:45 PM, Stylus [The Independent stage])
Her’s (9:00 PM, Brudenell Social Club [DIY stage])
The Vaccines (9:00 PM, Academy [Leeds Festival stage])
Wildwood Kin (9:00 PM, Leeds International Spiegeltent)
The Xcerts (9:30 PM, Key Club)
Pale Waves (11:15 PM, Brudenell Social Club [DIY stage])

Apollo Junction (electropop; Leeds; 12:00 PM, Trinity stage)
This band from North Yorkshire have been knocking around for the last 6 years with their brand of electropop and somehow, I have only discovered them now. Precious little is available online about them but according to this article, they enjoy Yorkshire Tea and fat rascals at Betty’s, which wins them bonus points in my book. Check them out before an A&R stumbles on them and they get whisked off to bigger venues.

The Orielles (garage rock; Halifax; 12:00 PM, Holy Trinity Church, CLASH stage)
We’ve featured The Orielles over the last 5 years on TGTF, so you’re probably wondering why would I include them here. They released their debut album ‘Silver Dollar Moment’ in February on Heavenly Recordings, and the LP has received accolades, including from The Guardian (“this album is a masterclass in how to produce guitar music that feels anything but futile: by making it specific, strange and superior to much of what’s come before.”). We knew them before they was and now you can enjoy them as a special guest at Live at Leeds. NB: They will also be appearing at Liverpool Sound City later on Saturday at the District and The Great Escape in a fortnight’s time, performing twice on Thursday the 17th of May.

SHEAFS (rock; 1:00 PM, Hyde Park Social Club)
The River Sheaf flows through Sheffield, so I’d fathom a guess that this group of Sheffield Hallam University graduates named themselves after it. This is a band with that snotty punk attitude and muscular guitar rock to back it up. They’ve been selling out venues in the UK and across the Continent, and it seems this is merely the beginning for them. NB: They will be performing at The Great Escape Saturday night the 19th of May at Hope and Ruin.

Tors (folk; Devon; 1:00 PM, Chapel)
Changing gears to a more conventional singer/songwriter outfit, my ears happened upon Tors, a quartet from Devon who amIACre miles away from the region’s most famous musical export Muse. Equally adept at a cappella four-part harmony and sweeping, guitar-driven, folky soundscapes ala Fleet Foxes and Goldheart Assembly, they’re for those interested in a slower, yet richer musical experience. NB: Tors appear Friday night the 18th of May at St. Mary’s Church at The Great Escape.

The Snuts (rock; Whitburn, West Lothian; 2:15 PM, Key Club)
I imagine most bands from Scotland are asked if they are from Glasgow or Edinburgh. The Snuts are from Whitburn, West Lothian, smack dab in between the two. I reckon they must favour Glasgow, as they’ve named a song after it that’s already hit over 440,000 streams on Spotify. No wonder: they’ve got that feel good guitar rock vibe going that everyone loves. Well, most everyone, right?

Black Futures (rock / electronic; London; 3:15 PM, Key Club)
Love psych rock? Love electronic? Hate that the two genres are never together in one band? Fear no more. Black Futures from London are a duo that have somehow successfully melded the two, giving each its due. A band after my own heart. NB: Black Futures will appear at the Great Escape Thursday the 17th of May at Green Door Store.

Hollow Coves (folk; Brisbane, Australia; 4:00 PM, Leeds International Spiegeltent)
Folk duo Hollow Coves will be travelling quite a distance for Live at Leeds. They hail from the hometown of BIGSOUND, the picturesque Queensland port city of Brisbane. You can expect angelically beautiful harmonies from the acoustically inclined folk duo. NB: Hollow Coves will appear twice on Thursday the 17th of May at the Great Escape.

Knightstown (electronic; Brighton via Glasgow; 4:00 PM, Headrow House [NME stage])
In a previous life, Michael Aston was a freelance composer and the keyboardist in C Duncan’s live band. Over the last few years, he’s been making music of his own under the name Knightstown. Aston’s swirly, emotional falsetto vocals float over his electronic compositions, drawing him favourable comparisons to Jamie Woon. He’ll provide an atmospheric performance that will be in sharp contrast to most of the other performances in Leeds on Saturday. NB: He will perform Saturday the 19th of May at The Great Escape as part of the FatCat Records showcase.

The Indigo Project (indie rock; Leeds; 4:00 PM, Stylus [The Independent stage])
I always like a good local band getting the opportunity to showcase at the festival in their own hometown. The Indigo Project are also no strangers to Live at Leeds, having played the event last year. Jangly, bright guitar pop guaranteed to bring a smile to everyone’s face.

whenyoung (pop-punk; London via Limerick, Ireland; 4:00 PM, Brudenell Social Club [DIY stage])
Pop-punk may have been borne out of the Noughties, but it’s still alive and kicking. Female-fronted whenyoung, Irish transplants in the Capital, recall the peppiness of Avril Lavigne while sitting nicely alongside acts like Dream Wife and False Advertising. NB: whenyoung are scheduled to play at the Haunt on Thursday night the 17th of May at the Great Escape.

Lady Bird (punk; Kent; 4:15 PM, Key Club)
Slaves and Drenge got the party going on political punk a few years ago, and the UK has never looked back since. With IDLES and LIFE performing at back to back SXSWs the past 2 years, it seems likely that their buddies from the South East, Lady Bird, will get an invite to Austin soon enough. Signed to fellow Kent natives Slaves’ Girl Fight Records, their future in releasing the kind of informed punk they want is bright. NB: Lady Bird appear at the Great Escape twice on Friday the 18th of May.

Tremors (synthpop; UK/French band based in London; 4:30 PM, Brudenell Social Club Community Room [DIY Neu stage])
Tremors are two Englishmen and a Frenchman from Marseille who somehow came together with the notion that they were going to meld French electropop and New Wave and they were going to do it on their own. So far, they’ve only released a series of singles, including this year’s two heart-pumping tunes, ‘Technicolour’ and ‘Broken Glass’. As an unashamed fan of synthpop in all its guises, Tremors are a unique curiosity worth your time at Live at Leeds.

Stay tuned for the next part of this preview on Live at Leeds 2018. Hopefully tomorrow!

 

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2018: best bets among UK rock artists showcasing at this year’s SXSW

 
By on Wednesday, 7th March 2018 at 11:00 am
 

This year, only Carrie and I have been available to write content for the TGTF Guide to SXSW 2018. Being short-handed, we decided to consider trends in who was being invited from the UK and let what we found direct our previews on the artists coming over from the UK to Austin.

One thing we found unusual about this year’s shouts is that quite a few bands and artists we’ve previewed and indeed, some who actually saw in Austin at a recent SXSW, have been invited back. DIY punks LIFE (Hull), Shame (London) and IDLES (Bristol) will be laying waste at their appearances at the British Music Embassy at Latitude 30 on Monday night, Thursday afternoon, and Thursday afternoon and night, respectively. Could it be that SXSW and the BME are banking on a repeat on their breathless, exciting, uncontainable performances last year? Could be.

Also coming round for a victory lap in Texas will be Glasgow glam band Catholic Action, who have been riding high on the critical acclaim of their autumn 2017 debut album ‘In Memory Of’. [NB: I wrote about them and 3 other acts in the Music Bloggers Guide to SXSW 2018, which you can read here.] Female-fronted trio Doe, who also wowed crowds last year at the DIY showcase on the first night of festivities at the BME, will be making a return appearance, this time gracing the stage of Latitude 30 Wednesday afternoon. Longtime indie stalwarts The Wedding Present, helmed by David Gedge, will also be coming back to Austin, having in previous editions of SXSW. Whether they’ll make another surprise appearance in a bike shop, we’ll have to see.

This is not to say that the UK isn’t sending a whole raft of new and great rock talent to entertain us next week. On the DIY punk front, Glasgow’s Breakfast Muff and Tijuana Bibles, along with London’s Goat Girl, will give you something to shout about and raise your fists to. If you prefer your rock more pop-orientated, SXSW also has you covered. Flyte, who we’ve covered for a few years here on TGTF, will be making their first appearance in Austin with their summer 2017 Island Records debut ‘The Loved Ones’ under their belt. Brighton furnishes SXSW with two exciting rock acts, The RPMs (pictured at top), who will open the Friday afternoon festivities at the BME, and the female-fronted Yonaka. You can read my SXSW 2018 preview of The RPMs through here.

Sometimes your name can make you infamous and as someone once said, any publicity is good publicity, right? London hard rockers Steak were named by local Austin culture blog do512 as having one of the best names of artists showcasing at this year’s event. Admittedly, we may have unfairly maligned some of the less Googleable band names in the past: Cabbage, College, Merchandise and Shopping, anyone? But if you’re going to bring a rock band to Texas of all places, you can’t go wrong with naming yourself after a great cut of beef. Another London band named in do512’s piece were Our Girl, the London trio fronted by Soph Nathan who were discovered, shall we say, after supporting SXSW 2015 alums Honeyblood.

Please note: all information we bring you about SXSW 2018 is to the best of our knowledge when it posts and artists and bands scheduled to appear may be subject to change. To learn when your favourite artist is playing in Austin, we recommend you first consult the official SXSW schedule, then stop by the artist’s Facebook or official Web site for details of any non-official SXSW appearances.

 

Live at Leeds 2017 Preview: editor Mary’s best band bets

 
By on Wednesday, 19th April 2017 at 11:00 am
 

Please note: as we always recommend in all of TGTF’s festival previews, the information we post here on Live at Leeds 2017 is current at the time of posting. We strongly encourage you to check in at the Live at Leeds 2017 official Web site closer to the start of the event to confirm venues and set times. Wristbands for the event in Leeds on Saturday the 29th of April are still available at the bargain price of £32.50 plus handling if purchased online; VIP tickets are sold out. More information on where you can purchase your tickets in person or online is available here.

SXSW 2017 alums: Here’s a list of artists we either saw last month in Austin who we enjoyed AND/OR we previewed ahead of the festival -AND- will also be appearing at Live at Leeds in 2 Saturdays’ time. For your convenience, I’ve listed them in order of appearance on the day so you can slot them into your growing schedule. The best of the best are marked with an asterisk. (*)

LIFE (2:00 PM, Leeds Beckett Union Stage 2 [Dr. Martens Presents]) *
Ten Tonnes (2:00 PM, Chapel) *
Airways (3:00 PM, Leeds Beckett Union Stage 2 [Dr. Martens Presents])
Jade Bird (4:30 PM, Faversham Patio)
Annabel Allum (5:00 PM, Social)
Be Charlotte (5:00 PM, Faversham)
IDLES (7:15 PM, Key Club [DORK Stage])
She Drew the Gun (8:00 PM, Wardrobe)
Temples (8:00 PM, Church)
Lewis Watson (8:15 PM, Holy Trinity Church [Clash Stage])
The Academic (9:00 PM, Lending Room [WTGR Stage]) *
Dream Wife (9:00 PM, Brudenell Social Club [DIY Stage])
Slaves (9:00 PM, Academy)
Flamingods (9:45 PM, Leeds Beckett Union Stage 2 [Dr. Martens Presents])
Rag‘n’Bone Man (9:45 PM, Leeds University Union Refectory)
The Big Moon (10:00 PM, Brudenell Social Club [DIY Stage])
GURR (10:45 PM, Brudenell Social Club Games Room [DIY Neu Stage])
AJ Tracey (11:00 PM, Faversham)
Let’s Eat Grandma (11:00 PM, Chapel)

To add to the best 3 from above and round things out to a even 10 acts, here are an additional 7 I recommend from the fantastic Live at Leeds 2017 schedule:

The Gallery (Wakefield; 12:00 PM, Lending Room [WTGR Stage])
Wakefield is, of course, famous for being the birthplace The Cribs. But the Jarmans should probably get used to sharing the city with another band. The jangly guitars of The Gallery, reminiscent of Arctic Monkeys before they turned into Queens of the Stone Age, will take you back to the simpler times of British indie.

Wyvern Lingo (Wicklow, Ireland; 1:00 PM, Nation of Shopkeepers)
While already deemed national treasures in their country, most people outside Ireland have only heard of Wyvern Lingo from their association with Irish megastar Hozier, their members Karen and Caoimhe providing him backing vocals at live shows and the group supporting him on UK and Irish tours. Imagine the Staves if they’d gone pop and r&b.

Matt Maltese (London; 2:00 PM, Wardrobe)
It took Morrissey a while to be anointed the title ‘The Pope of Mope’. That said, given the current state of world affairs, it stands to reason that there should rightly be more artists coming out and telling it like it is without sugarcoating it. Piano playing Matt Maltese is one of them, coming out with the sweepingly beautiful ‘As the World Caves In’ to convey his despair. Seriously, close your eyes, and you could swear you’re hearing The Moz.

The Wandering Hearts (London; 3:15 PM, Holy Trinity Church [Clash Stage])
A stark contrast to all the indie and pop acts at this year’s Live at Leeds are The Wandering Hearts, an Americana / alt-country group from the big smoke. Recent signees to Decca Records, the band will provide a welcome midday set different from nearly everyone else invited to this event, with their lush harmonies smartly picked guitar.

Paris Youth Foundation (Liverpool; 5:00 PM, Oporto)
The return of Ride to the record shops this year proves the washy guitar wall of sound era isn’t over. Liverpudlians Paris Youth Foundation takes this and does one better by adding synthpop to the mix, lending an anthemic feel to their tracks. Having released their debut album late last year, this is still early days for them, but I reckon now is time to get on the bandwagon.

Tender Central (Devon; 5:15 PM, Holy Trinity Church [Clash Stage])
India Bourne is a Devon-born, classically trained cellist who now goes by the stage name Tender Central. It’s a good description of her sound, which takes full advantage of her ethereal vocals and her careful crafting of an equally evocative, all-enveloping soundscape. Take a moment and consider the thought of seeing such music being performed in a church. Got it?

The Pale White (Newcastle; 5:30 PM, Church)
While Patrick Carney is busy remoulding his girlfriend Michelle Branch, now is an excellent time to discover the band who will dethrone the Black Keys when they aren’t paying attention. While we can’t be sure their successors will be Newcastle’s The Pale White, their brand of down and dirty blues rock is a suitable North East alternative to that of Southampton’s Band of Skulls.

 
 
 

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There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

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