Looking for previews and reviews of SXSW 2019? Right this way.

SXSW 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | Live at Leeds 2016 | 2015 | 2014
Sound City 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | Great Escape 2018 | 2015 | 2013 | 2012

Don't forget to like There Goes the Fear on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

(Charity!) Album Review/Essay: Three Minute Heroes – #HearMeOut

 
By on Tuesday, 25th April 2017 at 12:00 pm
 

Three Minute Heroes album coverSome argue that there have always been reasons for despair. That times like these are no different than other very difficult days that have come before, so we should just shut up and get on with it. In the face of all this doom and gloom, we need to hold on to the hope that the future leaders of tomorrow will have the open minds and kind hearts to turn things around and do what’s best for this world for the times ahead. In the current society largely unconcerned what happens to its young people, it’s no wonder why they are increasingly feeling marginalised and as if they don’t have a voice. In Britain, this all is coupled with the long-standing tradition of ‘stiff upper lip’, making for an environment of anxiety and emotions, all bottled up and kept behind bedroom doors.

We already know where that can lead to. Tom Chaplin’s debut solo album ‘The Wave’ chronicles how his life spiralled out of control while he tried to keep those emotions contained through drink and drugs. Thankfully, he found strength within himself to find help before it was too late. There’s a reason, too, why North West charity Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM) was created: to reduce the shockingly high suicide rate among young British men who feel they can’t speak up about their pain because of the stigma of mental illness. On this side of the Atlantic, To Write Love on Her Arms was set up to similarly provide support young people with addiction and depression and connect them with the resources they need.

As a former contributor to their publication CALMzine and having struggled with depression myself, I have great empathy for those who are suffering in silence, who feel like no one cares or will want to listen. Further, it pains me greatly that our children, who should be enjoying the most carefree time of their lives, are filled with anxiety and depression. So how do we build an environment where our youth feel safe to express how they are feeling and can do so without feeling vulnerable?

A special place in East Yorkshire have done just that and one better, have also amazingly worked music into the equation. Going strong for over 2 decades, The Warren Youth Project in Hull is empowering young people aged 14 to 25 by supporting them be able to take control of their own lives. The independent, not-for-profit label Warren Records associated with the Project recently released the Three Minute Heroes album ‘#HearMeOut’, borne out of the Project’s partnership with schools in East Yorkshire, is hopefully the first in a long line to come. The album was part funded by The Joe Strummer Foundation and the Headstart Hull Partnership Programme led by Hull City Council.

During Three Minute Heroes’ workshops in this region of England, students were guided and encouraged by mentors to share their feelings through creative, stream-of-consciousness writing exercises. Their words offer an honest, unfiltered peek into the minds and the thoughts that are troubling our youth, and they were turned into lyrics by local bands and singer/songwriters and incorporated into songs. What better way to encourage young people by showing first-hand how creativity through the sharing of emotions can lead to art that can reach and continue to inspire others?

Three Minute Heroes at Withernsea High School with mentor Redeye Feenix
Rapper and mentor Redeye Feenix with students at Withernsea High School
(photo provided courtesy of Three Minute Heroes)

Musically, the LP offers the listener a wide variety of genres. On standout ‘Home’, alt-folk group The Mighty and the Moon tackle physical abuse and foster care, taking on the poignant subject matter with a thoughtful and deft hand. A folky vibe mixes with soul on ‘Paint a New Picture’ by Ruth Scott featuring Kristian Eastwood, conveying the sadness of a child growing up without his mother. Hillbilly Troupe’s ‘Dead Langer’ touches on the plight of the homeless, its catchy Americana rhythm not only propelling the track forward but also making the track memorable. False Advertising’s ‘It’s Been a While’ sums up the youth’s feelings of disconnectedness from society, their fuzz-filled rock the sonic equivalent of banging one’s head on a table in frustration.

The further you go into the album, the more you come to emphathise with what our youth are struggling with in their own heads. The drawn out lyrics in Crooked Weather’s ‘Skeletons’ demonstrate the fight to silence your anxiety with what you intellectually know is the reality. Despite the resoluteness of the lyrics in The Dyr Sister’s ‘See, Hear, Speak’, the words come across as if they are said as mantras, not fully believed by their writer or fully realised. Yet. The handclaps on ‘I Want to Be Human’ by The Quicksilver Kings serve to punctuate the repeated moments that children feel when the adults in their lives aren’t taking them seriously. And there’s so much more on the ‘#HearMeOut’ album to discover.

Young people today face so many obstacles and people telling them “no”, so it’s not surprising they feel unsupported and alone. The ‘#HearMeOut’ album is hopefully just the starting point for the Three Minute Heroes initiative. In raising awareness of mental health among youth and their providing a safe place for young people to voice what’s on their mind, it’s a natural extension of what The Warren Youth Project and Warren Records stand for. Let Three Minute Heroes serve as a fine example not just for in Britain, but for the world what can be achieved in supporting our children and with real, positive results.

8/10

Three Minute Heroes’ ‘#HearMeOut’ album is now available to stream for free on Bandcamp and below. However, we here at TGTF encourage everyone to buy the limited CD at the minimum donation of £10 or more if you can spare it. All proceeds will go towards bringing the #HearMeOut campaign to more young people. You can also directly donate to Three Minute Heroes and The Warren Youth Project through here.

 

SXSW 2017: Monday night variety, including Americana at the Swan Dive, pop at The Gatsby and rock at the British Music Embassy – 13th March 2017

 
By on Monday, 3rd April 2017 at 5:00 pm
 

After our arrival in Austin on Monday afternoon, Mary and I officially began our music festival adventures at SXSW 2017 on Monday night at the Swan Dive, which played host to a showcase of alt-country and Americana artists. We only stayed long enough to see one band, but it turned out to be a fortuitous choice, as the first act on the evening’s bill was outstanding Finnish duo Tuomo & Markus. (Mary also wrote about them in this previous SXSW 2017 review post.

Tuomo and Markus internal

Tuomo Prättälä and Markus Nordenstreng are each career musicians in their own right, but they came together recently at Wavelab Studio in my own adopted home of Tucson, AZ to record an album of contemporary Americana, with contributions from well-known friends, including members of Wilco, Calexico and The Jayhawks. Though the album, titled ‘Dead Circles’, has yet to be released outside of Scandinavia (its North American and European release is due later this year), I found out later in the week that Rolling Stone contributor David Fricke had already named it to his list of ‘New Albums from the Best of SXSW 2017’.

FRENSHIP internal

Following Tuomo & Markus’ set, Mary and I set out in separate directions (you can read her Monday evening review here). I headed to The Gatsby, which was playing host to the heavily-hyped and well-attended Pandora showcase. After a brief wait in the queue, I got inside just in time to see another duo act, FRENSHIP, whom I’d already encountered in my preview of Los Angeles bands at SXSW 2017. James Sunderland and Brett Hite’s high energy blend of organic songwriting with electronic dance music is immediately captivating, and their anthemic tracks ‘1000 Nights’ and ‘Capsize’ fit perfectly on the large, brightly-lit stage at The Gatsby. You can hear more about FRENSHIP’s Monday night set in my post-performance interview with them right back here.

"chk

The next act on the Pandora stage was Brooklyn-based dance pop band !!! (aka chk chk chk, if you want to say it out loud). They made an entrance worthy of all three exclamation points, and proceeded to shimmy and shake through a set that was equal parts glitz and Jazzercise. Their new album ‘Shake the Shudder’ is due out on the 19th of May, and if you love to dance, you’ll want to catch them on tour this summer: they already have dates scheduled in the UK and at home here in America.

Lo Moon internal

I’m not sure how I missed L.A. rock band Lo Moon in my aforementioned preview, but I was pleasantly surprised by their intense and atmospheric set on the Pandora stage. The video for their latest single ‘Loveless’ came out just after SXSW, and the drawn out anticipation of its slowly unfolding drama is a fair representation of their music, though they do make a much more powerful impact in live performance.

[youtube]https://youtu.be/bnXkMNyc794[/youtube]

False Advertising internal

Before the first night of SXSW could officially close, I naturally had to pay a visit to the British Music Embassy at Latitude 30. The last two bands on the DIY + TicketWeb showcase that evening were Manchester-based False Advertising and Exeter trio Muncie Girls. Both bands fall into the rock category, but False Advertisting were more on the fuzzy, grunge end of the continuum, while Muncie Girls have a brighter, cleaner sound. False Advertising do an interesting lead vocal/drums switch between Jen Hingley and Chris Warr, but as I was never able to see Warr’s face beyond his hair when he was singing, I think I’d have to say that I prefer Hingley in the forefront. Fellow frontwoman Lande Hekt of Muncie Girls had a more immediately engaging stage presence, though her pleasant smile was rather ironic, given the subversive lyrics behind her band’s catchy punk sound.

[youtube]https://youtu.be/wEhsPWHAhhY[/youtube]

Muncie Girls internal

Monday night at SXSW 2017 was a grab-bag of different bands and different sounds, but it was only the tip of the iceberg. Stay tuned to TGTF for my further accounts from the week in Austin, and if you haven’t been able to keep up with Mary’s fast-paced coverage of events, you can find everything collected right back here.

 

SXSW 2017: Monday night at the DIY / Ticketweb UK showcase at Latitude 30 – 13th March 2017

 
By on Monday, 27th March 2017 at 4:00 pm
 

It’s going to take some getting used to that the Music portion of SXSW artist showcasing officially starts on Monday and not Tuesday. Carrie and I have enjoyed either showcases at the British Music Embassy at Latitude 30 starring Northern Irish artists or sponsored by Trackd last year the last few times we’ve been in Austin, so it was nice to mix things up a bit this year with a lineup sponsored by someone else. This night’s showcase was sponsored by UK free magazine DIY and the UK arm of Ticketweb, now part of Live Nation. I arrived just in time for SuperGlu, the Manningtree rock group who I had seen 2 years ago at the upstairs room of The Mash Tun at Norwich Saturday night during Norwich Sound and Vision 2015. I wish to point out that thank you very much, I had seen this band before nearly everyone in Austin, proclaiming back then “1) I was supposed to be in Norwich to see this band, and 2) they’re going to do very, very well.” Boom.

SuperGlu, Latitue 30, Monday 13 March 2017

I don’t consider myself an expert on alt-rock, because it’s hard to class. What is alt-rockand what isn’t? And let’s be honest, sometimes you just don’t know what will float with music fans and what won’t, which ultimately is the litmus test. During a week in Austin that saw surprise (or maybe not?) performances by world-famous American bands Jimmy Eat World, Spoon and Weezer, SuperGlu held their own against them, suggesting from the climactic last notes of ‘Diving Bell’ that it would not be long before they would be joining their ranks in popular music history.

SuperGlu, Latitude 30, Monday 13 March 2017, 2

Frontman Ben Brown wore a University of Texas-Austin t-shirt and shouted the locals’ cry for “Longhorns!” to get the crowd riled up. Not surprisingly, this went over extremely well with the already inebriated and up for it Texans, not to mention a man who argued with Brown over which was the smallest town in England, his or Manningtree. (I’m still unclear who won.) The secrets to SuperGlu’s success? Being good friends and keeping things fun, which come across in spades in their self-described ‘dork pop’ music and live performance. While this might not be at the level of the Sex Pistols at the Lesser Free Trade Hall in Manchester in 1976, something tells me this is going to be one of those “were you there?” moments in rock. The photo below from my phone is intended to document the crazy that was happening that night. To listen in on my interview with the band in Austin, go here.

SuperGlu, Latitude 30, Monday 13 March 2017

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1H_6gImH80[/youtube]

Feeling like a letdown after SuperGlu was London-based Doe, compared frequently to Sleater-Kinney for their female-led DIY rock aesthetic. I give pink-haired lead singer and guitarist Nicola Leel massive props for her shouty loud, abrasive vocal delivery on tracks like ‘Last Ditch’, as she never once let up during their half-hour set, and the band gave it their all. The guitars were loud and scuzzy and indeed, the comparisons to classic ‘90s rock and noise pop make sense. It was just hard for me to pick out the melodies or find anything that stood out as particularly special.

Doe, Latitude 30, Monday 13 March 2017

From Doe, Croydon’s Jamie Isaac was a breath of fresh air, cutting through the fuzz with a dramatically different point of view. Some have compared him to wildly popular piano-player, production head and fellow Londoner James Blake, but that’s just lazy journalism. Isaac’s silky smooth tones envelop you like nothing else, grabbing you just as much as the darkly beautiful notes of his jazz-infused piano lines. To be fair, his music is less obvious, requiring more commitment by the listener to truly ‘get’ where he was going with his electronic leanings, and I sensed that people who had been there since SuperGlu’s set were less than enthralled. Give his ‘Couch Baby (Revisited)’ album (which includes ‘Find the Words’) a spin on your favourite streaming service to check him out.

Jamie Isaac, Latitude 30, Monday 13 March 2017

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTfYmEwefkY[/youtube]

I had expected Blaenavon to come next in the lineup, but I was surprised when a woman came onstage. Hrm, I thought, they don’t have a girl in their band, do they? For the record, they don’t. Manchester’s False Advertising, led by Jen Hingley, filled in for the Liphook, East Hampshire natives who weren’t able to get out to Austin that early in the week. Their loss was False Advertising’s gain: the incredible opportunity to showcase the first official night of SXSW Music at the British Music Embassy.

False Advertising, Latitude 30, Monday 13 March 2017

The energy in the ratcheted back up as they pounded out ‘Wasted Away’ and ‘Scars’ as highlights. They’ve got an interesting dynamic in that drummer Chris Warr also sings, and he and Hingley swapped instruments and positions like it was no big deal. The other obvious comment about False Advertising is that they have a lot of hair. It’s a good thing none of them needed to look down at their guitars, because they wouldn’t have seen the strings anyway. Carrie joined me shortly after False Advertising started, and I’ll let her fill you in on Muncie Girls’ closing set of the night.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-HP2sg0vaU[/youtube]

 

(SXSW 2017 flavoured!) Video of the Moment #2325: False Advertising

 
By on Thursday, 23rd March 2017 at 6:00 pm
 

Manchester trio False Advertising had their American close-up last week during their first visit to Austin. At SXSW 2017, they managed three high-profile evening shows, including starting things off right, performing at midnight at the DIY / Ticketweb UK showcase at where else but the British Music Embassy at Latitude 30. Considering who one of the sponsors of that show was, it seems entirely appropriate that their newest music video for ‘Not My Fault’ was entirely DIY by the band as well.

Continuing on with the long line of punk-y songwriters eager to write music with conscience, frontwoman and guitarist Jen Hingley explains, “We wrote this song whilst lamenting the loss of opportunity and hope that this last year’s political developments have brought to a generation…Whilst the American election was reaching its gaudy climax a few months ago, I found myself more and more falling asleep on the sofa in-front of Fox News, absorbing some pretty exaggerated stuff. I wondered if by watching it, that it might break me out of my own bubble and make me a super well rounded person. But instead it just filled me with despair.” Well, if we’re going to be sad, we might as well rock out to it, yeah? Watch the quick-moving, motion sickness-inducing promo for ‘Not My Fault’ below. Stay tuned for our coverage of their appearance Monday night at the British Music Embassy, coming soon here to TGTF.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFzrmmyrP5o[/youtube]

 

TGTF Guide to SXSW 2017: Northern England artists showcasing at this year’s SXSW

 
By on Wednesday, 1st March 2017 at 11:00 am
 

For so many years and continuing on to this day, the North of England has always been a hot bed for new musical talent. Today’s installment of the TGTF Guide to SXSW 2017. will introduce you to 12 acts from ‘oop norf’, some may you have already heard of or heard on the radio, some you may have not. Except where noted, the summaries below were written by our Northern Irish correspondent based in Derry, Adam McCourt, who also went to uni in Leeds. Please note: all information we bring you about SXSW 2017 is to the best of our knowledge when it posts and artists and bands scheduled to appear may be subject to change. To learn when your favourite artist is playing in Austin, we recommend you first consult the official SXSW schedule, then stop by the artist’s Facebook and official Web site for details of any non-official SXSW appearances.

All We Are – pop / Liverpool
Liverpudlian trio All We Are describe themselves on Facebook as “The Bee Gees on diazepam”. The description is not far off, as they showcase similarities in vocal textures and harmonies, but with more downtempo and wavy grooves. Although they are based in Liverpool, none of the members actually hail from there. Bassist Guro Gikling is from Norway, Rich O’Flynn from Ireland is on drums and Luis Santos from Brazil plays guitar, making them probably the most multinational band to attend SXSW from this side of the Atlantic. Their self-titled debut album, released back in 2015, is available now. FFO: Warpaint, Wild Beasts, Django Django [As of 21/2, this act is no longer listed on the SXSW Music Festival schedule.]

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_s6Sx4POl3k[/youtube]

Autobahn – punk / Leeds
Five-piece post-punk outfit from Leeds, Autobahn are Northern and proud of it. From depressing song titles to their screechy guitar tones, Autobahn’s music depicts the gloomy industrialisation of Northern England almost perfectly. Autobahn’s debut album ‘Dissemble’ was released in the summer of 2015 and contains all of the above, as well as Johnson’s honest lyrics and droning vocal melodies. [Their Facebook suggests a new album is done and dusted. We wait with baited breath. – Ed.] FFO: Joy Division, Bauhaus [As of 21/2, this act is no longer listed on the SXSW Music Festival schedule.]

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9D7XJ5HXXQs[/youtube]

False Advertising – rock / Manchester
False Advertising (pictured at top) are a self-proclaimed “twisted power-grunge” trio from Manchester. The female-fronted band create a perfect blend of dreamy guitar melodies and equally light-hearted vocal melodies against fuzzy guitar tones and a driving rhythm section. Fronted by Jen Hingley on guitar and vocals, backed by Josh Sellers on bass and Chris Warr on drums, their self-titled debut album was released in September 2015, and an EP titled ‘Brainless’ followed in 2016. FFO: Cheatahs, Nirvana

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNIyVEXC47Y[/youtube]

Findlay – blues / pop / London via Manchester
You can take the girl out of the North, but you can’t take the North out of the girl. Case in point: Natalie Rose Findlay, who goes by her surname just like fellow Mancunian-born Morrissey, doesn’t really give a monkey’s. We’ve seen her charismatic performances at festivals before, and we imagine her rough around the edges style, in line with the ever-burgeoning lo-fi rock scene both in America and the UK, will be just the ticket in Austin. FFO: The Kills, PJ Harvey (Mary Chang)

To read our past coverage of Findlay here on TGTF, go here.

Fizzy Blood – punk / Leeds
Since forming in 2014, Heavy rock five-piece from Leeds Fizzy Blood have made major strides with their huge in-your-face riffs, melodic vocal melodies and insanely energetic live shows. They released their debut EP ‘Feast’ on 22nd of June 2015 and have since amassed under their belt a vast number of international shows and tours alongside acts such as Allusondrugs, Sun Club, The Virginmarys and punk icons The Dead Kennedys, as well as appearing at top UK festivals Download, Live at Leeds and Sound City. FFO: Queens of the Stone Age, Allusondrugs, Pulled Apart By Horses

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TlhuzoMmL4s[/youtube]

Her’s – pop / Liverpool
Outsiders from outsider towns, Stephen Fitzpatrick from Barrow in Furness and Audun Laading from Kristiansand, Norway, met whilst at university in Liverpool. They instantly connected over a “love of peculiar, sardonic humour and wide eyed observations”, according to their Facebook bio. Hmm. Any way you slice it, the duo present a loveable blend of dream pop that seems to transport any listener to the seaside towns from which they individually hail from. FFO: Mac Demarco, Beach Boys

LIFE – punk / Hull
Considering all the crap that’s happening in the world today, sometimes you need a release valve. You need music you can listen to, to get your aggressions out. LIFE, hailing from the East Yorkshire riverside town whose most famous musical export has been The Housemartins, are clearly here to put Hull back on the British rock map. Incisive lyrics backed by punishing rock guitars? Yes, please. Oh, and if you needed any convincing, they also wrote a protest song unveiled on the day of that Cheeto’s inauguration. Check. FFO: The Clash, their recent tourmates Slaves (Mary Chang)

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qh62UUMBtQE[/youtube]

Menace Beach – alt-rock / Leeds
Menace Beach are an alt-rock act from Leeds, mainly made up of core members Ryan Needham and Liza Violet; the rest is somewhat of a revolving line-up. Menace Beach’s debut album ‘Ratworld’ was released in January 2015, which was followed up by the ‘Super Transporterreum’ EP in the same year and last month’s ‘Lemon Memory’, reviewed by our Rebecca here. FFO: Pulled Apart By Horses, The Jesus and Mary Chain [As of 21/2, this act is no longer listed on the SXSW Music Festival schedule.]

Read all of our past coverage on TGTF on Menace Beach through here.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8wHP56Dyzo[/youtube]

She Drew the Gun – singer/songwriter / The Wirral
From the banks of the Mersey in a small peninsula called The Wirral is where fuzz pop four-piece She Drew the Gun reside. Formed and fronted by singer/songwriter Louisa Roach, the band offer dark, fuzz-filled pop topped with delightful and emotive vocals. She Drew the Gun have received continuous support from BBC Radio 6 Music after their debut album ‘Memories of the Future’ was named ‘Album of the Day’ upon its release last April 2016. FFO: Big Deal, Julia Jacklin, Lucy Rose

Trudy and the Romance – pop / Liverpool
This Liverpool trio were formerly known as simply ‘Trudy’ and ‘Trudy Sings The Blues’ before settling on the poetic Trudy and the Romance. Oliver Taylor (vocals/guitar), Lewis Rollinson (bass) and Brad Mullins (drums) together produce raucous, guitar-driven indie pop with Hollywood-tinged vocal melodies that will simultaneously tug on the heartstrings and tap on the funny bone. FFO: Mac DeMarco, Tame Impala, Beach Boys [As of 21/2, this act is no longer listed on the SXSW Music Festival schedule.]

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpcdhEQdWtg[/youtube]

VANT – protest rock/punk / London via Seaham
London via Seaham band VANT have been slaving away in the industry since their formation in 2014. The protest rock group, led by Mattie Vant, have garnered attention after appearing as support for Royal Blood, as well as touring with DIY Magazine’s NEU tour. They’ve already hit a dizzying array of festivals, including Dot to Dot, Reading and Leeds, Glastonbury, 2000 Trees and Fuji Rock Festival in Japan, as well as racked up plays of their numerous singles anointed as Annie Mac’s ‘Hottest Record in the World’. Their debut album ‘Dumb Blood’ is out now; you can read our Steven’s review of last year’s ‘Karma Seeker’ EP through here. FFO: Otherkin, Palma Violets

Read our past coverage on VANT here.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=coeO8HWHjoc[/youtube]

The Vryll Society – rock / Liverpool
Expect the unexpected from The Vryll Society. With a sound that touches on different facets of classic, psychedelic and prog rock, the Liverpudlian quintet present a body of work sure to keep any listener on their toes. Fuzz-infused rock led mainly by the rhythm section of Lloyd Shearer on bass and Benjamin Robinson on drums with lots of decorative guitar flourishes from Ryan Ellis and Lewis McGuinness, all topped by Michael Ellis’ catchy, melodic vocals, The Vryll Society stimulate both the mind and soul with their music. FFO: Tame Impala, The Wytches, Honeyblood

Read our past coverage on TGTF on The Vyrll Society through here.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LxDXcg8rx3E[/youtube]

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

RSS Feed   RSS Feed  

Learn More About Us