Looking for previews and reviews of SXSW 2019? Right this way.

SXSW 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | Live at Leeds 2016 | 2015 | 2014
Sound City 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | Great Escape 2018 | 2015 | 2013 | 2012

Don't forget to like There Goes the Fear on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

Can Zayn Malik replicate the success of these former boyband members?

 
By on Friday, 31st July 2015 at 11:00 am
 

In March 2015, the pop world came to a standstill when Zayn Malik announced that he was leaving One Direction to live the life of “a normal 22-year-old”. Since leaving the boyband, the 22-year old has spent time in the studio with Naughty Boy, though the collaboration appeared to fall through after Zayn called the producer “a fat joke” in a Twitter feud in July.

On Wednesday, July 29th, 2015, Zayn took to Twitter again to announce he’s signed a solo record deal with RCA Records, whose other acts include the likes of Chris Brown, Justin Timberlake and Mark Ronson. He tweeted the following. Not quite the life of “a normal 22-year-old”, is it Zayn?

Nevertheless, Zayn Malik isn’t the first former boyband member to pursue a solo career, not by a long shot. Can he go on to replicate the success of these megastars?

Justin Timberlake

Having risen to fame as part of *NSYNC, Justin Timberlake made an instant impact on the charts with ‘Like I Love You’, ‘Cry Me A River’ and ‘Rock Your Body’ from his debut album, ‘Justified’. Three years later, Timberlake returned with ‘SexyBack’, giving the singer his first solo #1.

After a lengthy break from music (to pursue a number of acting roles and business ventures), he made his return in 2013 with ‘The 20/20 Experience’, which featured hits such as ‘Suit & Tie (ft. Jay-Z)’ and ‘Mirrors’.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DksSPZTZES0[/youtube]

Robbie Williams

In July 1995, a matter of months before Take That were set to embark on a worldwide tour, Robbie Williams was given an ultimatum by his bandmates: adhere to the band’s responsibilities or leave. He chose the latter, and the rest (as we all know) is history.

Since then, Robbie Williams has gone on to top the Official UK Single Chart seven times, with hits such as ‘Candy’, ‘Somethin’ Stupid (ft. Nicole Kidman)’ and ‘Rock DJ’.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BnO3nijfYmU[/youtube]

Ronan Keating

Following a successful run in Boyzone, Ronan Keating bid farewell to the boyband to pursue his own solo career, which has had all the thrills of a rollercoaster ride. The Irish pop singer’s cover of ‘When You Say Nothing At All’ gave him a debut #1, with ‘Life Is A Rollercoaster’ equalling his success a year later.

Keating went on to release a string of hits, including ‘Lovin’ Each Day’, ‘If Tomorrow Never Comes’ and ‘I Love It When We Do’.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=giABAfeEc0U[/youtube]

Nick Jonas

After The Jonas Brothers rose to fame on the Disney Channel, it was only a matter of time before one of them achieved solo success. Joe Jonas looked to be the odds-on favourite when his collaboration with Demi Lovato, ‘This Is Me’, landed in the Official UK Top 40, although his attempts didn’t quite work out.

Nevertheless, Joe’s younger brother Nick kept the Jonas flag flying with ‘Jealous’, which was kept off the number one spot by Jess Glynne – ‘Hold My Hand’ in April 2015.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yw04QD1LaB0[/youtube]

Lionel Richie

Way back in 1968, Lionel Richie joined American soul group The Commodores as a singer and saxophonist. His knack for writing a ballad earned Lionel Richie songwriting commissions from other artists, which paved the way for his own solo career.

The singer went on to release phenomenal hits such as ‘Hello’, ‘Dancing on the Ceiling’ and ‘All Night Long’, earning himself a spot on the Pyramid Stage at Glastonbury in June 2015.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PDZcqBgCS74[/youtube]

Other former boyband members that have embarked on a solo career include George Michael (Wham!) Nathan Sykes (The Wanted), Ashton Merrygold (JLS), Simon Webbe (Blue), Boy George (Culture Club) Brian McFadden (Westlife), Ricky Martin (Menudo), Morrisey (The Smiths), Phil Collins (Genesis), Gary Barlow (Take That), Michael Jackson (The Jackson 5) and many, many more.

 

New Music Fridays to launch next month

 
By on Monday, 22nd June 2015 at 11:00 am
 

New Music Fridays is the name for the new global release date of all albums and singles. The move, which comes into effect from Friday, the 10th of July 2015, is being implemented by the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI), which represents the worldwide recording industry. The introduction of New Music Fridays is taking place in 45 recorded music markets worldwide. Only 11 of these markets currently release music on a Friday.

So, why is the change being introduced? Currently, albums and singles are released in the UK and France on Mondays and in America and Canada on Tuesdays, while consumers in Australia and Germany have to wait until Friday to get their hands on the latest releases. Not only does this cause frustration for music fans when other parts of the world can access new releases before them, but this old system no longer makes sense in today’s digital world. IFPI believe that the move will benefit artists who want to harness social media to promote their new music, creating an opportunity to reignite the excitement and sense of occasion.

In the UK, the introduction of New Music Fridays is causing some major changes to the way in which the Official UK Top 40 is announced. The Official Chart Show, which is currently broadcast on BBC Radio 1 on a Sunday, will move to a new slot on a Friday evening, where it will be hosted by new show presenter Greg James.

The move has gained approval from some big names in the music industry, including Edgar Berger, chairman and CEO of Sony Music Entertainment. He described the move as “good news for music fans everywhere”, saying, “Today’s recorded music industry operates in an increasingly borderless world.  Hits can come from anywhere and spread everywhere. Some superstars have already launched their albums simultaneously worldwide, now all artists will be able to reach their global fan bases on the same day.”

New Music Fridays has also received backing from retailers, including HMV. Paul McGowan, chief executive at Hilco (owners of HMV), said of the change, “It’s a big opportunity for us to get music fans into our stores, and it’s something I hope gets full support from across our industry. New Music Fridays will get music to the high street when people hit the high street.  As the UK’s leading entertainment retailer, that makes perfect sense for us and our customers.”

Streaming services such as Deezer and Spotify are also supporting the move. Hans-Holger Albrecht, the CEO of Deezer, said, “Deezer welcomes New Music Fridays and the sense of occasion it will bring to the release of new music. Deezer’s editors are primed to make Friday the new start to their week to help people wherever they are make that exciting new discovery, just in time for the weekend.”

New Music Fridays begins on Friday, the 10th of July. All new albums and singles will be released at 00:01 local time. Further information on the new initiative can be found on the New Music Fridays Web site.

 

You’re in Ecstasy Without Me: How Jamie xx and his debut album ‘In Colour’ managed to polarise the entire music industry

 
By on Friday, 5th June 2015 at 11:00 am
 

The 1st of June 2015 will forever be marked by the highly-anticipated release of the debut solo album by Jamie Smith, known better by his now longtime alter-ego Jamie xx. Smith owes much to his integral position in the Mercury Prize-winning trio, as his membership to it has been nothing but positive, without a doubt opened doors to him in the worlds of production and DJaying. His remix prowess began in earnest when he worked on Florence and the Machine‘s cover of Candi Staton’s ‘You’ve Got the Love’ in 2009, progressing through remixes of his own band, Adele, Radiohead and Four Tet. I can’t even begin to quantify the number of festivals and line-up posters I’ve seen his name listed on, including the Californian desert dance party known as Coachella 2015. Not bad at all, son. Not bad at all.

The electronic-driven contents of ‘In Colour’, now available from Young Turks on both sides of the Atlantic, has been a labour of love and culmination of his professional life over the last 7 years. Clearly, it’s an important record for the 26-year old and one I’m glad he was able to release now, because it’s part of his continuing musical story. And yet, depending on who you talk to or indeed, to which circles you belong, its legacy as Smith’s first solo effort has already been called into question, and for an album that has been alive for less than a week.

The heart of ‘In Colour’, at least how I understand it, is Smith’s “almost obsessive chronicling of in early UK dance music”, its many genres translated into in his own versions to honour what has come before but still make something new and fresh of his very own. Personally, I think it’s pretty neat that someone still relatively young himself yet already very influential to many young music listeners is open and willing to admit how important music of the past has been to him as an developing artist.

Some have asked whether or not this LP is ground-breaking, some going so far as questioning if this collection deserves all the sales and accolades it will get. Others have hit out at Smith, saying that in a similar vein to the extremely popular xx, whose music has backed adverts such as those for the 2010 Winter Olympics and 90210, the album is simply uninspired landfill indie (or, I guess, landfill dance) for the masses and by default, has no artistic merit.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GD5BEh268p8[/youtube]

I suppose with the internet at everyone’s fingertips these days, one could argue that we all have the means to research each and every one of Jamie xx’s touchstones on ‘In Colour’, whether it be house, grime, dancehall or whatnot. In terms of what is ground-breaking or not, that’s really up to the listener, isn’t it? If social media during the 2012 Summer Olympics in London taught us anything, it’s that every single music listener on this planet doesn’t have the same background, so one young girl’s perception of ‘Wish You Were Here’ as a new Ed Sheeran song, while incorrect, can be forgiven. Somewhat. In terms of sales and accolades, this is entirely moot, a foregone conclusion, what with Pitchfork alone giving it a near perfect 9.3 (only dwarfed by a few records such as Kanye West’s perfect rating for ‘My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy’ in 2010 – not touching that).

‘In Colour’ as a whole was the album up for discussion on last night’s edition of Steve Lamacq’s Roundtable on 6 Music. The three-man panel had starkly different impressions of ‘SeeSaw’ from the album, which like earlier taster ‘Loud Places’ features the smoky vocals of Jamie’s xx bandmate Romy Madley-Croft. Louder Than War journalist John Robb commented of the track ‘SeeSaw’, “it’s just a bit too polished for me, really, it reminds me of flats built in city centres now, you think ‘who lives in those kinds of places?’ It sounds like what they’d listen to in them flats. The one thing I did like was the melancholy, the darkness to it.” Actor Robert Lonsdale’s assessment was middling, initially applauding Smith for “being brave for using lots of instruments and stuff like that, but then putting them through the synthesiser or the same effect or something, it all sounded…a lot of the album sounded quite similar.”

Lamacq’s fellow BBC presenter Tom Robinson provided the most even commentary, having admitted he’d already read reviews of it prior to coming into the studio and sensed the album’s polarising quality to the music community. He noted that in one review, Jamie Smith had been equated to the Sam Smith of dance music. Lammo winced at this suggestion, but Robinson dismissed it, saying, “Sam Smith is extremely good at what he does. It’s exactly right for his target audience, and it’s beautifully done. Perfectly executed, and it sells by the bucketload. This is going to sell by the bucketload.” This led to Lammo asking Robinson if he thought Sam Smith was groundbreaking; Robinson said no, but was quick to point out that Jamie xx has an already established history of breaking boundaries in the past.

Even if Jamie xx wasn’t perceived as a groundbreaking artist in the past, I ask, why should that matter on how ‘In Colour’ does in the shops, or how people view it in 25, 50 years’ time? Leave any preconceived notions or gossip you’ve heard about an artist at the door: the most important thing should be how an album sounds to your virgin ears.

Electronic dance music has long had the bad reputation with non-dance music fans that it’s impossible to feel, understand or “get”, as if you must be part of some misfit, card-carrying group to truly appreciate it for all its analogue vs. digital intricacies. This debut album from Jamie xx has, for better or worse, been put in a good position to do and be a lot of things that other releases in the dance genre could never hope to accomplish. Like all music that is reviewed day after day, it is one thing to have an opinion. We should all have our own opinions and draw our own conclusions on what we like playing in our ears and what we do not. What I find counterproductive are the attacks on this album on the basis that this isn’t good art, it is somehow unworthy of popularity or indeed, it’s unworthy of praise because of this popularity. If the true concern is about what this album’s legacy will be, why don’t we wait that 50 years out and see?

 

Mumford and Sons at Reading/Leeds 2015 – uninspired?

 
By on Wednesday, 25th March 2015 at 10:00 am
 

Do you remember between the ages of 15 and 18(-ish) when you’d sit glued to the antipodean drawl of Zane Lowe on a dark night around the middle of February? Waiting in awe to discover which titan of popular culture would be gracing the Main Stage at Reading and Leeds? You sat there ready to tweet, Facebook and text your friends about which clashes you were gutted about and which ones were glaringly obvious: I mean who WOULDN’T want to catch Black Flag over Arcade Fire on the Main Stage? They’re a punk rock institution, for god’s sake!

Now, regrettably in drips and drabs, before the bill is inevitably leaked by some cretin on Reddit, the line-up seeps out producing excitement levels tantamount to that first sleet of February. The kind of sleet where it starts and you think it’s going to snow, but instead it just dusts your porch for 5 minutes, then just goes back to being incredibly cold. That kind of faux-excitement.

Now coupled with the lack of a spectacle, we’re subjected to the damp squib that are Mumford and Sons headlining the Main Stage. A band who’ve released two mediocre albums that has led to them headlining Glastonbury and making inroads into the U.S. market that only Harry Styles and co., alongside Mumford, could dream of. Yes, I liked ‘Little Lion Man’, and it’s sure to provoke a pretty good reaction. But did anyone see the tame, lacklustre set the band threw out at Glasto? I did. You can drag out as many string quartets as you want, but when you’ve only got two records of material to run from, it’s never going to shock or surprise, let alone entertain.

Yes, Marcus Mumford has been brushing shoulders with Elvis Costello and Jim James of My Morning Jacket, but are the band any closer to releasing any new music? It doesn’t look that from where I’m sitting… In fact, coupled with Metallica’s booking, that’s two artists headlining the Main Stage who are likely to release a grand total of jack shit this year. Quite similar to Blink 182 last year as well; this smacks of bands being booked simply to bump up the bank balance before other projects. Is that what we should be expecting from £200+ worth of tickets? It’s an example of where those behind Reading and Leeds have fallen into the same trap that other festival bookers have done in the past. Going for what they assume is a safe booking over a genuine wild card contender, someone who can come on stage and be THAT SET that people are still talking about a decade on. Can you really see yourself in 10 years’ time telling friends and colleagues about a rousing rendition of ‘The Cave’? No, me neither. We all know that Sonisphere are just treading water until they can justify booking one of either Slipknot, Iron Maiden or Metallica again. It’s all just very safe. But why should festivals stick to what’s safe? (OK, so yeah, profit margins, but they aren’t cool.)

It’s probably unfair to just focus on where the institutions that are Reading and Leeds have just gotten it wrong. In 2013, the bookers got it ABSOLUTELY right. Biffy Clyro topped the bill on the Sunday, off the back of the incredible success of their most recent release, their double album ‘Opposites’.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdifHR-hKRw[/youtube]

Up until then they’d punctuated the middle of the roaster, teetering on the edge of doing better, but never receiving the backing to rise farther up. In 2013 though, the bookers at Reading and Leeds after a few 7/10 shows at recent festivals took a gamble; they elevated Simon Neil’s threesome of slippery pliant Scotsmen to the lofty heights of headliner. The result was arguably the best headline performance at Richfield Avenue in 2 decades. Every song was an anthem, every ballad a soulful sing-along, every riff a rollicking ripper (try saying that at the end of a festivals worth of stale Strongbow and warm vodka). It was a rousing success and elevated The Biff to the kind of heights that now has them touted as potential Wembley Stadium headliners. Now of course while Noel Gallagher “can’t live in a world where Ed Sheeran sells out Wembley Stadium”, I’m sure he wouldn’t mind seeing this sweaty topless threesome – what an image – screeching their balls off at the venue.

That’s the kind of effect a strong, edgy booking can have. That’s what can be achieved by going against the grain. It can stick in your memory and affect the careers of the artists involved. What does Mumford and Sons headlining Reading and Leeds mean? Probably a better turn out for the NME/BBC Radio 1 Stage, if I’m honest.

The head honchos at Reading and Leeds should take a leaf out of the books of groundbreaking festivals books like Bestival, Secret Garden Party or Latitude. Exclusive sets from out-of-the-ordinary acts like OutKast or The Chemical Brothers are far more likely to excite and inspire sales. In a time where pockets are pinched and times are tight, you’ve got to do a lot to encourage your average tweenager to spend £200 on a festival ticket and not a week-long blowout in Malia spent grinding on strangers whilst sipping on buckets of Red Bull mixers.

 

Official Albums Chart to incorporate audio streams next month

 
By on Friday, 13th February 2015 at 11:00 am
 

Following on from an announcement last summer regarding Official UK Singles Chart, as of March 2015 the Official Albums Chart in the UK will incorporate audio streams, the Official Charts Company has announced. The change will come into effect during BRIT Awards week (beginning Monday, the 23rd of February), with the first chart to incorporate audio streams being published on Sunday, the 1st of March 2015.

So, how will it work? The Official Charts Company will collect streaming data from Spotify, Deezer, Napster, Google Play, O2 Tracks, Rara, Rdio and Xbox Music, though only the 12 most streamed tracks from the standard version of the album will be taken into account. The top two songs from the album will be down-weighted in line with the average of the rest. The reason for this is to ensure that any albums featuring up to two runaway hit singles do not skew the performance of the parent album in the Official Albums Chart. The total of these streams will be divided by 1,000 and added to the physical and digital sales of the album. The 1,000 ratio is used to reflect the broad difference in value between a track stream and the price paid for an album.

Speaking about the announcement, Official Charts Company Chairman Korda Marshall said: “The Official Charts are a UK institution, followed both by music fans and the industry, so we do not make changes to them lightly. But with more and more people listening to albums via streaming services, it is right that we are now going to reflect streaming in the Official Albums Chart. It is particularly appropriate that this change will take place from BRITs week, when we will be celebrating some of today’s biggest album artists, like Ed Sheeran, George Ezra, alt-J and Royal Blood (pictured at top), among many others.”

Official Charts Company chief executive Martin Talbot added: “The Official Charts Company’s mission is to compile the most accurate, reliable and up-to-date charts around, and in 2015 that means reflecting the popularity of streaming, alongside downloads, vinyl and – still the most popular album format – the CD. Initial indications are that the impact on actual chart positions will be modest to begin with, but we expect this to grow as streaming becomes increasingly popular.”

According to the Official Charts Company, Ed Sheeran’s ‘X’ was the most streamed album of 2014, having generated more than 200 million track streams, Sam Smith’s ‘In The Lonely Hour’ was streamed over 140 million times and George Ezra’s ‘Wanted on Voyage’ notched up 70 million streams.

 

Dr. Martens #standforsomething UK Tour / October, November and December 2014

 
By on Friday, 18th July 2014 at 9:00 am
 

Dr. Martens have withstood the onslaught of – and reinvented themselves through – many – if not all – musical eras, fads, and fashions. No doubt ‘60s rockers found them very handy for keeping their feet protected from the tarmac, forcing a sticky gearlever to shift on a careworn Triumph and for kicking mods in the shins. Into the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, punk and the skinhead movement found DMs perfectly matched their aggressive image, even though most punks no doubt went home to their mums to tuck them in with a cup of cocoa at night.

Later on in the decade, as the hardness of punk split into gothic nihilism and dayglo optimism, Dr. Martens could be found on the feet of both groups – the perfect match to both a pair of leather trousers and a floaty flower-print dress. And then came the 1990s, and with it came grunge, a musical movement tailor made for a decent pair of sturdy footwear. Truth be told, there’s barely an era in music that DMs haven’t been associated with, continuing to the present day. So it’s no surprise that the brand has decided to become directly involved in a bit of music promotion.

Now in its second year, the Dr. Martens #standforsomething tour promises to repeat last year’s achievement of “taking some of the most exciting live acts around into tiny venues”. Which makes it sound like they’ve managed to get White Denim to play a phone box, and that isn’t really the case. I’m not sure the venues involved would agree with the “tiny” description – Newcastle’s Cluny 2 has raked seating, a balcony and 160 capacity. Nor is it unusual for the bands involved to play mid-size venues: Eagulls are playing the Cluny on their own headline tour, for instance.

Such pedantry aside, Dr. Martens have come up with an exciting, directional lineup, heavy on bands that feature the words “post”, “punk”, or indeed “post-punk” in their bios. Wales’ Funeral for a Friend have been plying post-punk pop with a distinctly American twist for over a decade now, and the public’s appetite shows no sign of waning. Leeds’ Eagulls are a touch more ramshackle, more punk and less metal, but nonetheless play in the same league.

A pattern emerges when we come to We are the Ocean – distorted, upbeat guitar riffs, insistent, double-tracked vocals and clean-as-a-whistle production. Only their mothers could tell them apart from Funeral. Things take a left-field turn in Los Campesinos! (pictured at top); instead of distorted guitars, there’s violins, any manner of improvised percussion and vocals that are more sung than screamed.

And then there’s the matter of Sydney’s Tonight Alive. Fresh from gracing the soundtrack of the latest Spiderman film, Jenna McDougall brings her impressively toned abdomen and similarly toned vocal cords to the humble environs of Newcastle’s Cluny 2. A combination of laid-back Australian surf style and distinctly Transatlantic musical chops, there’s no doubt that Tonight Alive will bring a dose of glamour to Tyneside – and to be fair to the promoters, considering the auditoria Tonight Alive are used to playing, the Cluny may indeed appear tiny in comparison.

When you boil it down, #standforsomething is nothing more than a short series of unrelated gigs across the country with a rather large marketing budget attached. The bands are already touring the UK: Tonight Alive, for instance, hit London, Birmingham, Manchester and Glasgow, completely independently, before their Martens-sponsored Newcastle date. Similarly, this gig closes We are the Ocean’s and Funeral for a Friend’s tours, whereas it falls directly in the middle of Eagulls’. Nonetheless, a good bit of promotion for some decent bands never goes amiss, so whichever way you slice it, if you’re into DMs, good music, or perhaps even both, there’s no better way to spend a night with your fellow leather enthusiasts. And you might bounce home with a bit of free swag. Catch the tour on the dates listed below and register on the Dr. Martens Web site here to register for tickets.

Saturday 4th October 2014 – Edinburgh Cabaret Voltaire starring Funeral for a Friend
Saturday 11th October 2014 – Cardiff Clwb Ifor Bach starring Eagulls
Saturday 25th October 2014 – Liverpool Shipping Forecast starring We are the Ocean
Saturday 8th November 2014 – London Lexington – TBA
Saturday 22nd November 2014 – Birmingham Flapper starring Los Campesinos!
Saturday 6th December 2014 – Newcastle Cluny 2 starring Tonight Alive

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF was edited by Mary Chang, based in Washington, DC.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

RSS Feed   RSS Feed  

Learn More About Us

Privacy Policy