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Dutch Uncles / March 2017 UK Tour

 
By on Friday, 28th October 2016 at 8:00 am
 

Greater Manchester band Dutch Uncles have announced their fifth album is on the horizon. It’s all been very hush hush but with a new profile photo and cover shot on their Facebook, anticipation is high. Says frontman Duncan Wallis, “For the past 15 months we’ve been constructing an album that reflects our live instincts, so to say that we are giddy at this announcement would be an understatement.”

Naturally, the band will be supporting this new release and with that, they’ve announced a UK tour to take place in March 2017. A presale has already started, but the general sale for tickets begins today at 9 AM. For more of TGTF’s coverage on Dutch Uncles, go here.

Wednesday 1st March 2017 – Edinburgh Electric Circus
Thursday 2nd March 2017 – Newcastle Cluny
Friday 3rd March 2017 – Leeds Wardrobe
Saturday 4th March 2017 – Nottingham Bodega
Monday 6th March 2017 – Birmingham Hare and Hounds
Tursday 7th March 2017 – Sheffield Plug
Wednesday 8th March 2017 – Oxford Academy 2
Thursday 9th March 2017 – Bristol Fleece
Saturday 11th March 2017 – Brighton Haunt
Sunday 12th March 2017 – Southampton Talking Heads
Monday 13th March 2017 – London Village Underground
Wednesday 15th March 2017 – Manchester Dancehouse Theatre

 

Dutch Uncles / December 2015 UK Tour

 
By on Friday, 14th August 2015 at 9:30 am
 

Dutch Uncles have recently announced a brief run of live dates in the UK for this December, following their upcoming appearance on the Dr. Marten’s #standforsomething Tour on the 26th of September and their November support dates for Garbage.  This tour will continue their campaign to support ‘O Shudder’, their latest album released back in February on Memphis Industries. Tickets for the following shows are available now.

Previous TGTF coverage of Dutch Uncles, including our Martin’s recent live review from Deer Shed Festival 2015, can be found right back here.

Thursday 10th December 2015 – Newcastle Cluny
Friday 11th December 2015 – Leeds Brudenell
Tuesday 15th December 2015 – Bristol Fleece
Wednesday 16th December 2015 – Cardiff Globe

 

Deer Shed Festival 2015 Review (Part 2)

 
By on Wednesday, 12th August 2015 at 2:00 pm
 

To catch up on part 1 of Martin’s coverage of Deer Shed Festival 2015, head this way.

Saturday at Deer Shed Festival belongs to the kids. The workshops are in full flow, the bizarre moving sculptures are operated to the verge of destruction, and the bubble man does well to escape being trampled to death by a million over-excited feet. As if seen through the eyes of a 3-year-old child, this is what we did: “We went first to the craft and singing tent. We made a bug out of pipe cleaners and some foam. We watched the singing but didn’t join in because we were shy. We found a table with some ink stamps and played with those, including stamping our own arm. We met a friendly but slightly scary man who taught us how to make a really good paper aeroplane. Daddy helped me make it. Then we stood on top of a really high platform and threw the aeroplane down to Mummy. It flew really well!

“We watched some older children make computer-controlled Lego robots that moved by themselves. They looked very exciting! I’ll play with those myself when I’m a bit older. Daddy helped me cut out some cardboard fins that we stuck to a bottle of water to make a rocket. Then a man put it on a launcher, pumped it up and we counted down from 10. When everyone shouted “Lift-off!” I pressed the button and my rocket shot into the air and landed on the roof of the tent! It was the best rocket of all! I’ve still got it in my bedroom.

“We saw a big table full of metal toys that Daddy said was Meccano, and we bolted some bits together to make a flying helicopter chair. Then we played with the bubbles that the bubble lady made. She could make lots of bubbles all at the same time! Then Daddy bought me a bubble saxophone so I could make my own bubbles. Then we were all very tired so we went for a sit down.” Phew. There’s some great stuff for all ages, and particularly for the older kids the wackier sideshows – like the battle game that uses a measure of brain activity to move a ball back and forth – seem particularly unique. And I’d single out Andy Chipling and his expert method of folding a paper aeroplane for giving this particular big kid a skill that I’d always wanted to refine but never been able to. Ten minutes well spent!

At Deer Shed, it’s folly to make a long list of ‘must-see’ bands. Who you can actually get to see very much depends on circumstances, rather than forward planning. One or two of our group ‘saw’ no bands in the conventional sense: there was plenty of music in the background, but they had the good grace to be guided by the needs of their kids, rather than chasing down the music. Having said that, this is how some of the bands went down on Saturday.

In the Lodge stage it was Celtic day. The Pictish Trail is Johnny Lynch, who hails from Eigg and lulls us all into a false sense of security by making his first few numbers gentle acoustic ditties. Which had me reading my programme with incredulity: “This is supposed to have electronica in it!” All good things come to those who wait, however, as all of sudden Johnny breaks out the drum machine and wild synth sounds: add in a dose of surrealist humour and all is well with the world.

Hinds are brilliant on the main stage. The four Madrid girls create dreamy garage songs perfect for languid singalongs…if anyone knew the words. Actually, ‘Davey Crockett’ is pretty simple to sing. And play, by the sounds of its three chords. This sort of thing is widely called lo-fi, although that relates more to the relaxed vibe than any reflection on their sound quality. A lovely slice of sunny Spanish insouciance. All Tvvins are a Dublin trio who make spacey slices of bass-heavy electro-pop. The guitarists comprehensive pedal board tells its own story – the guitar work is heavy on the delay, rapid strums generating a wide soundscape that brings to mind another Edge-y son of Ireland’s fair city. Superb toe-tapping stuff.

It’s tradition not to have rain at Deer Shed, but tradition went out of the window this year as the heavens opened mid-afternoon. Given that two of the stages were under cover meant that, if anything, more people got to see more music. But what of the main stage? If there was any band that could entice punters out from under canvas to have a boggy boogie, it’s Dutch Uncles, and they don’t disappoint. If there’s a sharper band this side of the equator, I’d like to hear them. Duncan Wallis’ remarkable body moves never fail to impress, and he does well to throw them given the increasingly slippery stage. Those that braved the rain were rewarded a couple of songs in with a break in the cloud, waterproofs steaming in the sunshine. I can’t be far off double figures seeing Dutch Uncles now, and every time it feels like a treat. Their music is fractal-like: no matter how familiar one thinks one is with it, each repeat listen reveals further hidden details, whether they be time signature changes, details of instrumentation, or lyrical insights. A fine achievement.

Damien Dempsey‘s none-more-Irish passionate delivery is the discovery of the festival for me, for three very important reasons: 1. You know exactly what he’s saying, at all time. 2. He talks about stuff that is relevant, and real, to everyone who has to suffer the human condition. 3. He means – properly means – every word he sings. He stridently complains about the historical treatment of the Irish (and half the rest of the world) on ‘Colony’; you might not agree with his interpretation of history, but you can’t deny how effective a cheerleader he is for the dispossessed. ‘Serious’ paints a brilliantly-acted picture of a malicious drug dealer trying to convince an innocent to sample his wares in a seedy Irish pub using a narration with a spectacular Dublin accent. Really powerful stuff, with hints of two Bobs – Geldof’s uncompromising attitude and Dylan’s storytelling passion.

And so we come to the pinnacle of the entire festival, John Grant: in his own catty way, one of the least appropriate headliners for a child-friendly festival this side of Marilyn Manson. The entirety of sweary solo début ‘Queen of Denmark’ is devoted to documenting his drug, alcohol and homosexual relationship problems. Granted, this isn’t your usual bargain-bin autobiography, illustrated as it is with beautiful piano playing and lucid wordplay, but still. Thank goodness my kids are too young to pick up on lines like “I’ll sell your Grandma on the street to buy crack”, “that little ass of yours looks just like food”, or crowd favourite “I casually mention that I pissed in your coffee”. What’s that man singing about, Daddy?

What people want as their reward after spending £200 to drag the kids around a field all day is to stand, sit or lie down together in the darkness to something that they know, can sing along to, and can feel good about, preferably something that reminds them of the fun they had in the years BK. Not some lonely chap complaining about his boyfriend’s inadequacies, regardless of how eloquently those sentiments are expressed. After Johnny Marr‘s triumph last year, the hope was that future years would essentially duplicate the pattern for well-regarded contemporary indie band on Friday for men of a certain age, big name from the parents’ past on Saturday for everyone. Unfortunately, it was not to be. Whilst there will have been true fans of both headliners in the crowd, neither were the unifying force that one would ideally want, which is a bit of a shame.

Deer Shed isn’t even close to being all about the music. But the music is an integral part of the experience (and the price), otherwise we’d just take the kids to scout camp and sit around rubbing sticks together and singing Kumbaya. Of course it’s a little churlish to criticise an event that gets so much right, but the headliners have such a dominant influence over the feel of the whole event, who plays at the top of the bill really matters. Having said all that, in 2015 Deer Shed joined the big time – in common with the vastly bigger festivals we all know about, regardless of the headliners, people flock to Deer Shed because they love the vibe, they love the company, and they love the setting – chilled out, friendly, and beautiful. What more could you ask for?

 

Dr. Martens #standforsomething UK Tour / September, October and November 2015

 
By on Monday, 29th June 2015 at 9:00 am
 

Dr. Martens has just announced Dutch Uncles, Palma Violets and Lonely the Brave as the first three headliners on its Stand for Something Tour 2015.  As in the past, this year’s Stand for Something Tour will once again feature six shows in six different cities, each headlined by a different up and coming band.  Though the headliners for the remaining 3 nights of the tour are yet to be announced, we at TGTF would like to take the opportunity to preview the three bands already lined up to play.

Dutch Uncles, pictured in the header photo at top, released their most recent album back in February, the third in their discography titled ‘O Shudder’.  They will appear at Tramlines, Kendal Calling, and Festival Number 6 later this summer before headlining the Glasgow Stand for Something show on the 26th of September.  They will spend this November on tour in Europe and the UK with Garbage.  When asked by the promoters of the Dr. Martens tour what Dutch Uncles stand for, the band responded in a very literal, yet humourous way: “Determinedly Underrated Tricky Choruses Housed in Uncompromisingly Natured Cadenzas and Listened to Enduringly, Sort of.”  Previous TGTF coverage of Dutch Uncles is right this way.

Palma Violets by Ed Miles

London’s Palma Violets have already had a bustling 2015, headlining the NME Awards Tour in February and March, then releasing their second LP ‘Danger in the Club’ in May.  Their summer vacation plans include the ongoing Glastonbury Festival, as well as T in the Park and Reading and Leeds. They will headline the Dr. Martens show on the 10th of October in Norwich before heading out on selected tour dates with The Vaccines in November.  For our previous coverage of Palma Violets, click here.

Lonely the Brave

Moving forward from their support slot on last year’s Stand for Something Tour, Cambridge quintet Lonely the Brave will headline the show on the 7th of November in Belfast.  They have just released a new version of their debut album ‘The Day’s War’, which they have dubbed the ‘Victory Edition’.  The new release includes remixes and live versions from the original album as well as 12 previously unreleased tracks.  Building upon their already substantial fan base, Lonely the Brave will play summer festival dates at T in the Park and Reading and Leeds ahead of the Dr. Martens tour.  Our previous coverage of Lonely the Brave is right back here.

Following are the announced dates, venues, and headline acts for the Stand for Something Tour 2015.  Check the Dr. Martens Web site for updated information as the live dates approach.

Saturday 26th September 2015 – Glasgow Nice ‘n’ Sleazy starring Dutch Uncles
Saturday 10th October 2015 – Norwich Owl Sanctuary starring Palma Violets (sold out as of 17/09/2015)
Saturday 24th October 2015 – Leeds Brudenell Social ClubTwin Atlantic (sold out as of 17/09/2015)
Saturday 7th November 2015 – Belfast Limelight starring Lonely the Brave
Saturday 21st November 2015 – Sheffield CorporationThe Wytches (sold out as of 17/09/2015)
Saturday 28th November 2015 – London Our Black HeartBury Tomorrow (sold out as of 17/09/2015)

 

Live at Leeds 2015: Editor Mary’s Roundup (Part 2)

 
By on Thursday, 7th May 2015 at 2:00 pm
 

Part 1 of my Live at Leeds coverage is this way. For more of my photos from the event, check out my Flickr.

After the highs achieved and all before the 5 o’clock hour at Live at Leeds 2015, I suppose it was inevitable that there would be some kind of letdown ahead. Any music writer will try and map out a reasonable festival schedule that doesn’t have you running yourself ragged, but that too is an inevitable part of the festival experience for us, whether we’re in Austin, New York, Sydney, Liverpool or Brighton. However, the one thing you can never really plan for technical difficulties or cancellations.

There was no mention at all on her Facebook page – and the complete lack of a Twitter account didn’t help either; take note, bands: your fans really do want to know if you’ve decided to pull out of a major event – so it was with much disappointment to learn at the press area Saturday morning that Lonelady, the only show I had pencilled in at the Belgrave Music Hall and the main electronic draw for me all day, had been replaced by someone else. I will say that the sting was slightly taken off by the Patty Smith’s Dirty Burgers Chris and I had eaten there for lunch, as they were without a doubt some of the most delicious burgers I’ve ever had.

In my mind, it was to be left to Worcestershire’s astronomyy to pick up Lonelady’s slack and bring out the beats. I will say first that I have no idea about all the specs and details it takes to run a music venue, but the HiFi on Central Road certainly upset a whole lot of people Saturday in Leeds. What should have been a huge celebration of all things electro and soul in their basement venue turned into a massive problem, which I should have guessed when I ran from the Academy down to the club and astronomy hadn’t even started performing yet. After waiting probably an additional half hour after his appointed starting time, venue staff announced astronomyy would not be going on at all. Boos and jeering began and sadly, it would not be the last of such at the HiFi.

I used the downtime to visit with my Wakefield friend Matt Abbott, a friend of mine who formerly made a name for himself in music as the wordsmith behind Skint and Demoralised, is now a spoken word artist, performing as part of A Firm of Poets, who were at the featured lineup at the Black Swan, part of the Fringe portion of Live at Leeds. I mention the Fringe, as even if you’re skint (no pun intended) or don’t fancy paying for a wristband to Live at Leeds proper, there is still plenty on in town during the weekend that’s free and open to the public if you fancy it.

After we said our goodbyes, I thought it would be a good idea for me to head up to A Nation of Shopkeepers to see what the fuss was about BAD//DREEMS. I have pretty bad claustrophobia – I famously requested my biology midterm exam seat assignment in a university lecture hall be changed one semester, as I had been given a desk directly next to a wall – so this turned out to not be ideal for me at all; the place was packed, which was great, but after I had successfully passed the event bouncer who let me into the place, I found myself pinned in from all sides from people either trying to get drinks from the bar or those who refused to be kind and to make way for anyone else.

I suppose it’s your right to be territorial if you’ve gotten to a venue early and wish to stay, but some people were getting very tetchy and unhappy and it got to the point where I felt like I was going to faint and I had to leave. I did hear BAD//DREEMS’ music through a window outside and I very much enjoyed the guitar rock I did hear. If anything, the crammed in like sardines atmosphere suggests that the people of Leeds were very keen on seeing and hearing the Aussie band play, which is really fantastic for a band so far away from home. They’ll be in Sheffield tonight (the 7th of May) at the Rocking Chair, and I hope I get out of the airport quick enough to see them.

A return to the HiFi to see electro soul duo Honne and their full band setup including a bass player, drummer and a backing singer was worth the wait. However, because of the delays introduced by the astronomyy set that never materialised, the entire day’s lineup was delayed, causing some already drunk by then Yorkshire youths to start acting up, shouting insults in Honne’s direction. I feared a riot , which wouldn’t have been great since the HiFi space is in a basement, so you’ve really got nowhere to run.

Thankfully, they were able to get their act together (literally) and played a truncated yet satisfying set, including the Hype Machine favourite ‘Warm on a Cold Night’, which I imagine will be the song all of their fans will request for years to come. The equally soulful ‘All in the Value’ was another set highlight. Seek out their just released this week EP ‘Coastal Love’ on their own Tatemae Recordings.

As I was stood down the front for Honne, I couldn’t help but fret that I really should have left in the middle of their set to get to Leeds Town Hall for Dutch Uncles, who released their third album ‘O Shudder’ in February. If I’m entirely honest, I was hoping for an appearance of Muncan alongside frontman Duncan Wallis for the track ‘Decided Knowledge’. While I was fretting, I was scanning Twitter to see if there was any point to head there, figuring that the Cribs’ appearance later in the evening likely meant there’d be a massive queue for the hometown boys. Someone had posted a photo of the queue already forming hours ahead of the Cribs’ set, so I skipped them in favour of food, which is a necessary part of festival life, even if you have to force yourself to eat!

Trudging back up to A Nation of Shopkeepers, I arrived at the venue in the middle of a set by all-girl group Jagaara from North London. Punters were gushing over their music, which doesn’t sound all that unique to me: guitars, electronics, female voices, this is well-trod upon ground, folks. I guess I’ll have to investigate them more to form an educated opinion.

I was really at Shopkeepers for Boxed In, whose appearance at Blackjack London and AIM’s Friday night showcase at SXSW 2015 was super fun. I, along with Boxed In mastermind Oli Bayston, were about to be bowled over by the reception in Leeds. I spoke to several people in the audience prior to their set and they all said they had Boxed In’s debut album released last year and couldn’t wait to see the band perform. (Bayston and co. weren’t supposed to be my last band of Live at Leeds; I had intended to stay for the last band Real Lies. But due to technical difficulties at the venue and nearly an hour of waiting after Boxed In, getting my ears pummeled by squeals from the speakers that weren’t supposed to happen and no actual music, I called it a night.)

Running just a mere 5 minutes behind schedule, as soon as Bayston played his first keyboard note, the crowd turned the place into a vibrant dance party. The irrepressible rhythm of ‘Foot of the Hill’ encouraged the ladies to my right to do the dance equivalent of Peter Crouch’s robot moves, arms and legs flailing; ‘Mystery’, the Boxed In radio hit everyone was waiting for caused everyone to shake their tail feather.

As someone who spends a good part of her time trying to promote dance music as a fellow fan, to be able to witness such a spectacle and with so many people enjoying themselves watching a electropop act was equal parts validating and exciting. Fantastic. What a wonderful way to end my first Live at Leeds experience. Fingers crossed I will return next year!

 

MP3 of the Day #877: Dutch Uncles

 
By on Monday, 13th April 2015 at 10:00 am
 

In a rare turn of events (ha!) I’m not going to say anything about this free download of fellow Mancunian Deadbear‘s remix of Dutch Uncles‘ ‘Upsilon’, because the parties involved are much more eloquent about what happened here than I ever could have been. Take it away, fellas: Deadbear speaks first:

It seemed like a perfect song to try and distill into something totally simple as opposed to the beguiling complexity of the original track.

Most of the track was written and produced at night. I wanted to create that feeling of being both isolated and totally in awe, maybe in love too, with the night time – the silence, and that sense that you’re the only one awake for miles around. It’s a feeling I’ve always really enjoyed and thrived on, it’s kind of magical in a way. Especially if you’re creating something.

Robin Richards from Dutch Uncles:

We first heard of DeadBear after a collaboration with our pal Alex Hewitt (Egyptian Hip Hop) and we’ve been fans ever since. We love the less obvious approach on this remix and can imagine it being the perfect, calming reprise to the originals climax.

Duncan Wallis from Dutch Uncles of the original track:

’Upsilon’ is about an overdramatic decision to quit Facebook or MySpace because, when you’re young, you don’t always have the capacity to see other people’s lives (or the bits they want to show you at least) for what they really are. This is also a result of the immense peer pressure to join in with the flirt of social media.

Thought provoking. Listen to and grab the mp3 for your very own – and for free! – below. You can also compare and contrast the remix to the original, as I’ve handily included an embed of the original Dutch Uncles track directly below the remix.

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

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