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Interview: Matthew Hitt of Drowners

 
By on Thursday, 28th July 2016 at 11:00 am
 

“Well, it was more about liking the way the word looked written down than the fact it was a Suede song”, Drowners frontman Matthew Hitt says about his band’s unique name. “Having said that, that whole Britpop thing has influenced my writing, lyrically. I think Jarvis Cocker and Damon Albarn are master songwriters, and I regularly revisit their records.” Hitt and his New York City-based band released their second album on Frenchkiss Records, ‘On Desire’, in June. You can read my review of the long player here.

Their eponymous debut album, which was released in winter 2014, was described by Q as standing in stark contrast to the electropop saturating the airwaves that year. “When I started writing the songs for the first record, I feel like every band I went to see in New York were drenching themselves in reverb, and there was a lot of like drawn out 4-minute songs,” explains Hitt. “So I guess I was trying to do the opposite of that and have everything trimmed and clipped into the bare essentials. My attitude to that has since changed, but it was really a reaction to the bands I was seeing live at the time. Nowadays, I think we just try to write music that is some sort of reflection to who we are and what we feel as a group.”

Hitt quickly dismisses the cliché of the difficult second album. “It wasn’t really that difficult because by the time we came to writing it ,we all had ideas we wanted to try, and that meant things were exciting again. After touring the first record, we were all ready to start working on new things. When we first met Claudius [Mittendorfer, their producer for ‘On Desire’], we talked about wanting the record to have an atmosphere to it in the way that [Echo and the Bunnymen’s fourth album] ‘Ocean Rain’, for instance, does.” Working with Mittendorfer turned out to be a comfortable for Drowners. “He was very helpful in showing us how to technically achieve these different sounds. We all got along with him, and so the environment in the studio was pretty light and fun. We would try a lot of things out and constantly bounce ideas. I just look back on it being a really fun experience.”

Something that one will latch onto quickly while listening to ‘On Desire’ is the pairing of lyrics on painful subject matter regarding breakups with oddly joyful sounding instrumentation, especially in the guitar work, reminiscent of Johnny Marr’s exemplary playing in The Smiths. Hitt concurs with this. “Yeah, that painful lyric / joyful music thing is something I think we all love about songs in general. It’s certainly present in The Smiths, and for that reason, they are a big influence. I’ve been a lifelong fan, so it makes sense that it affects my musical vocabulary.” When I ask him what other artists had guided them along in the making of the new album, he says, “While we were writing this record we were also listening to a lot of Roy Orbison, ABBA and Echo and the Bunnymen, so I guess they all influenced it too.”

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZgmPsicWQw[/youtube]

The stories told in the songs on ‘On Desire’, in particular ‘Someone Else is Getting In’ (see live video from SXSW 2016) and ‘Conversations with Myself’, are hard-hitting on the emotions and seem very personal, which Hitt says is true to some extent. “I think they’re a combination of personal experience, things I’ve overheard people say and things I’ve read about. I think the songs that are on the record were chosen because they shared themes. The main one, I think, being the idea of desiring something. I spoke to Erik [Lee Snyder, Drowners’ bassist] a lot on this record about the types of things we wanted to sing about so I got some ideas from him. Um…otherwise, it’s the same thing I always do: keep a notebook of lyric ideas and browse through it to see if anything ‘fits’ with the music we had written.”

A standout track on the new album is single ‘Pick Up the Pace’. I asked Hitt if he could tell me about the writing of it. “Well, Erik and Daniel [Jacobs, Drowners’ drummer] wrote the music for it, and we recorded it at Electric Lady Studios. I walked around listening to the recording for a couple of weeks, trying to figure out the top line. I wrote it the lyrics one morning and recorded it that afternoon. I guess it’s about lack of communication in general, and the evasiveness that can come from that.” The Welsh-born singer even brought in part of his upbringing to add personal flavour to the track. “In my mind, it all takes places in the village I grew up in, hence the reference to terraced houses.”

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISjkphX07WU[/youtube]

Earlier this summer, Drowners toured in America as support for another band we’ve covered a lot here on TGTF, The Joy Formidable. Hitt says it was a great experience. “The tour was a lot of fun. It was a few weeks before the record came out, so it was interesting to see what kind of reactions we were getting to the new songs that most people hadn’t heard before. The Joy Formidable are lovely people and we had a couple of nice evenings with that lot.” As for the rest of the year, the band will be pretty busy getting ‘On Desire’ out there live to the masses. “We play Lollapalooza at the end of July, and then [there’s] more touring. I know we’re heading to the UK and Europe in October, which I’m pretty excited about. I love touring the UK.”

And lest you think that Drowners would ever rest on their laurels during these dog days, think again: “I know we’re also keen to start writing more new tunes, so I suppose that’s how we’ll spend our summer.” But what if they’re tired of having their heads down, of being studious musicians working on new material? Matthew Hitt has a solution that will work in a pinch. “We always listen to ABBA’s greatest hits in the van. Full-on Swedish singalongs.”

‘On Desire’, Drowners’ sophomore album, is out now on Frenchkiss Records. The band appears in Chicago at Lollapalooza this coming Saturday, the 30th of July, at the BMI stage at 3.20 PM.

 

Album Review: Drowners – On Desire

 
By on Tuesday, 21st June 2016 at 12:00 pm
 

Drowners On Desire album coverYes, you might still have still have the mac, brolly or even a jumper on standby if you’re in Britain or Ireland. However, out here in America, it’s definitely summer, and we’ve all got their sunglasses on. Happy solstice, everyone! And at the end of this week, we can celebrate with the release of Drowners’ second album ‘On Desire’. (In contrast, their self-titled 2014 debut on Frenchkiss Records was released in the chilly dead of winter.) The feel good waves of indie rock of its predecessor are also evident on the new record, Make no mistake: don’t expect any earth-shattering political overtures here. Instead, settle in for this series of songs about love, in its all its heartbreaking, pain-inducing, false hope giving forms.

‘On Desire’ begins with a swift boot kick to the rear, as a loud crash of guitars ushers in ‘Troublemaker’. In a lovely Smiths-ian way, what follows is a jaunty, fun guitar line accompanying a short, but clearly sinister tale of embroilment, of being drawn into the web of a femme fatale. In another in your face, up tempo number, Hitt bemoans in ‘Someone Else is Getting In’ his mistake giving his woman the space she asks for, only to have another suitor swoop in and get into her bed during their break.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5ZuJSy4WBw[/youtube]

In ‘Conversations with Myself’, the feeling of being left behind comes across like being struck by the freight train of heavy beats in the bridge. Except for the oddly reined-in chorus, the synth notes and cacophonous guitar notes dig into your skull, as if you’re being skewered. Hitt’s initially sotto voce vocals in ‘Trust the Tension’ give way to full-fledged nastiness. The goth-y, Echo and the Bunnymen guitars seem sympathetic as he admits turning into a bad version of himself while being yanked around by a partner who won’t commit. There’s a variation on the same theme in the very catchy single ‘Pick Up the Pace’, an upbeat synth-led number that proved peerless live at SXSW 2016.

Unlike Morrissey, who prefers to sit on the sidelines like a wallflower and generally feels rebuffed if ignored, Hitt has suffered by being directly cheated on and screwed with. We’ve all been messed with when it comes to the opposite sex, and there’s satisfaction in finding someone to empathise with. The sad thing is, you’re left wondering if it was better him than you. Standout track ‘Another Go’ chronicles another pessimistic conversation inside Hitt’s head, utilising Moz’s oft-used formula of coming to a foregone conclusion about unsuccessful love without actually being proactive. Insecurity is painful to listen to, but it’s on this track where Drowners gets closest to the Morrissey/Marr partnership, with its winsome guitars and pop feel. In ‘Human Remains’, both Hitt and a mysterious other man referenced suffer from the throes of unrequited love. The song benefits from Hitt’s oozy, boozy, schmaltzy delivery: “desire doesn’t fade / it only gets replaced.” Oddly, the croonery ballad ‘Dreams Don’t Count’ is a strange misstep. I guess this one’s for the Alex Turner fans?

In case you somehow missed it, the South Wales-born Hitt is also a model. Having been on and off one of the most eligible bachelors of New York City, he’s been linked romantically to the likes of Alexa Chung and Dakota Johnson. This makes one wonder if his words in Drowners songs are a means of artistic catharsis. Hey, if writing about ex-lovers works for Taylor Swift, why not, right? Regardless of how far your heart gets into the emotional underpinnings of this album, the timing of this release makes it perfect for playing whilst your ‘Long Hair’ (yes, pun intended) is flying in the breeze out of an open-top convertible. Or whatever vehicle you can manage to stick your head out of without getting wet and cold.

8/10

‘On Desire’, the sophomore album from New York City’s Drowners, is out this Friday, the 24th of June on Frenchkiss Records. For more coverage of Drowners on TGTF, go here.

 

Single Review: Drowners – Pick Up the Pace

 
By on Friday, 20th May 2016 at 12:00 pm
 

Words by Krystal Garcia of Distorted Heartbeat

“Honey, you’ve got to pick up the pace” is precisely what NYC’s Drowners aspire to do with the release of the second single from their forthcoming album ‘On Desire’. Where the album’s first single ‘Cruel Ways’ was a bit of a departure from the more indie pop sound of their 2014 self-titled debut, ‘Pick Up the Pace’ bridges the gap between the band’s previous Smiths-like material and the darker, more mature direction of the new album.

Produced by Claudius Mittendorfer, whose body of work includes the Jangly Guitar Master himself Johnny Marr, ‘Pick Up the Pace’ isn’t completely without dark, brooding undertones. Smiths comparisons aside, Drowners wear many other influences on their sleeves with pride: Suede’s charisma, Jarvis Cocker-like vocals and late ‘90s Cure guitar. Lyrically, Welsh frontman Matthew Hitt weaves a tale of the dangers of complacency. “The ball is dropped, so the chain reacts”, he says, in attempt to reclaim his own emotional well-being. Hitt’s smooth, confident vocals are paired with Jack Ridley’s equally confident, whimsical guitar work. Together, they are grounded by a crisp rhythm section consisting of Erik Lee Snyder on bass and Daniel Jacobs on guitar. Floating above it all is a light layer of synths that while initially may be off-putting, eventually they tie together the dark and light aspects of the song.

While not quite on the same level of their musical predecessors, ‘Pick Up the Pace’ shows that Drowners have graduated to the next level of their career: capable of writing dark melodic pop just as well if not better than their token jangly pop.

7.5/10

Single ‘Pick Up the Pace’ from New Yorkers Drowners is available now. ‘On Desire’, the second album from New York City’s Drowners, will be released on Frenchkiss Records on the 24th of June. More coverage of Drowners on TGTF can be found here, including editor Mary’s coverage of them at SXSW 2016.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISjkphX07WU[/youtube]

 

Video of the Moment #2074: Drowners

 
By on Monday, 2nd May 2016 at 6:00 pm
 

New York post-punk Drowners are an act responsible for one of my favourite moments from SXSW 2016 on Saturday night. It should have been a given that I would enjoy a band who named themselves after one of my favourite Suede songs.

They’ll be releasing their second album in late June, and early single ‘Cruel Ways’ now has its own promo video. Taking a simplistic approach, the band – Welsh frontman (and sometimes model) Matt Hitt and Americans Jack Ridley, Erik Snyder and Daniel Jacobs – are filmed in a claustrophobic, darkened club. It actually feels appropriate for the lyrical subject matter, as Hitt’s powerfully acerbic words about a failing relationship with the bombastic musical treatment both feel like they’re fighting the environment they’ve found themselves in.

‘On Desire’, Drowners’ sophomore album, will be released on the 24th of June on Frenchkiss Records.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LoVnInXQaeg[/youtube]

 

SXSW 2016: rock and pop to close out editor Mary’s time in Austin (Saturday, part 2) – 19th March 2016

 
By on Tuesday, 12th April 2016 at 2:00 pm
 

After the rain of Friday night, a chilly air had settled onto Austin. It’s not normal to be wearing gloves and a hat in Austin in March, but when needs must… Carrie has hypothesised the precipitous drop in temperature translated to less people willing to stand outside in the cold. This was probably true to some extent, as when it came to the showcase the irrepressible Har Mar Superstar‘s showcase put on at Cheer Up Charlie’s, I was surprised there wasn’t a queue to get into the place. Once inside, the outdoor patio area wasn’t full either. Maybe everyone was waiting for Har Mar Superstar’s own headline set at the end of the night? Not sure.

Though I missed first two acts Cold Fronts and Ghost Babes Compilation alums Slothrust, I made it to red lipsticked smiley face sign on Red River shortly after New York City’s Drowners began. Every year and a half or so, I experience a dramatic change in musical taste, and I’m wondering if it’s time yet again to make a move. The Strokes revolution in the early Noughties passed me by, probably because I was too busy with school, as well as being too busy then with my then Duran Duran obsession. Maybe it’s time for me to get back to back to basics-type rock, as I wanted a second look and listen (after the Paradigm showcase Wednesday night) at Drowners before we left Austin.

Drowners at Har Mar Superstar Best Party Ever at Cheer Up Charlie's, Saturday at SXSW 2016

It’s been long bemoaned that there really hasn’t been a band ready to take the Great British Guitar Band mantle, especially in light of The Vaccines changing their sound last year on ‘English Graffiti’. Is it somewhat appropriate that The Vaccines’ buddies Drowners might be in the lead to vie for the now open honour? While they’re technically not eligible since they only have one British-born member (their singer / guitarist Matthew Hitt is Welsh), with their sound, they might be close. Maybe the world is ready for the “jangling fringe-shaking indie-pop“ Q described their 2014 self-titled debut album as having? We’ll hang tight for the release of their second LP ‘On Desire’ at the end of June and see if the tectonic plates of indie will move.

Drowners at the Har Mar Superstar Best Party Ever at Cheer Up Charlie's, Saturday at SXSW 2016

After saying goodbye to a new and famous friend at Cheer Up Charlie’s, I went across the street to check in with some soon-to-be-famous friends at Stubb’s. There was no question as to who was the biggest act of the night at the well-known barbecue joint’s outdoor stage: upstate New York’s X Ambassadors, a recent American indie rock success story after releasing their debut album in 2015, being helped along with fellow Interscope band Imagine Dragons, and the blowing up of their single ‘Renegades’. However, I was there to see Honne play on the biggest stage of their lives.

Honne at Stubb's, Saturday at SXSW 2016

Judging from the audience reaction further back, including my almost going deaf thanks to a young woman who would not stop screaming and going mental during their entire set, I can tell this slice of American music fans are truly taken by the futuristic soul sound of Andy Clutterbuck, James Hatcher and their touring band. It is a surreal moment when you witness seeing a band at a dark, claustrophobic place like Leeds Hi-Fi Club and then a year later, you see them play some place as massive as Stubb’s, thousands of miles away. It also isn’t hard to imagine them filling out similarly large venues in the future with their smooth grooves and, as previously mentioned in my review of their show Friday at the British Music Embassy, their sensual “baby-making music”.

From one massive venue, I moved on to yet another, in the form of the Pandora Discovery Den at the Gatsby. So much for the terribly incorrect impression I had that this place would be a small, intimate affair – ha! The queues outside the venue was enormous, with badge holders unlikely to get in, let alone the wristband crew. Further, I felt guilty that a lot of youngsters who were fans of the man I was going to see were going to have to watch and listen from very far away outside and away from where the action would be inside, especially since it appeared most of the crowd inside the Den inside that I was trying to get around were more keen on getting wasted and weren’t even facing the stage. I never understand this at shows in DC or anywhere else. If all you want to do at SXSW is to drink, go to a bar with your friends and get out of the way of people who actually want to witness a musical experience.

Troye Sivan at the Pandora Discovery Den, Saturday at SXSW 2016

After waiting for what seemed like forever in the pass queue, I made it inside, only to find out the venue was running badly behind schedule. While the Pandora Discovery Den was certainly high on production values, the overall feel was generic, lacking charm and character that you’d get at a place like Stubb’s. I guess that was the point of such a pop-up venue? It seemed more like Australia’s biggest deal as of late, South African transplant and already massive pop star Troye Sivan, could have been performing anywhere, not in Austin.

Troye Sivan at the Pandora Discovery Den, Saturday at SXSW 2016

The 20-year-old already has everything he needs to be a young pop star: the million-watt smile, the doe eyes, the big lips, all part of the charisma needed to keep young people’s short attention. I find it sad that ‘Youth’, his most recent video, has been getting more attention on YouTube because of his sexual orientation and not for its own musical merit. Are we as a human society ever going to get away from such stupid conversations? I’m clearly not Sivan’s target audience (generally, musicians in track suits aren’t my thing, sorry, ha) and his music isn’t what I’d probably chose to listen to, but I’m not ashamed to admit that I wouldn’t mind dancing to his electronic-tinged urban pop at a club. Go forth and keep inspiring our young people, Troy!

It shouldn’t have been a big deal to get down 6th Street to Tellers, as it was only 3 blocks west from the Gatsby. We’re used to seeing so many rowdy people on 6th Street on a Saturday night, but I was not prepared to be inappropriately touched by a man when I trying to get out of a crowd and worse, I saw his face leering at me as he did it, but it’s not like screaming or yelling would have done anything. I still feel dirty and gross from the incident. I realise I could have taken a different route around the crush of people, but thinking about it some more, why should I have? SXSW has evolved over the years I’ve attended and while I accept this sort of stupid thing happens at random whenever there’s a bad apple in a high-density music event, it doesn’t make it right. I was so shaken up by what happened that by the time I finally arrived at Tellers, I was having trouble locating my ID in my bag. It was some good luck that I ran into (male) friends at the door of the venue so I felt safe. Or at least safer.

Get Inuit at Tellers, Saturday at SXSW 2016

It seemed appropriate that the band that officially kicked off my SXSW, Kent’s Get Inuit, would be seeing me off from Austin as well. After being in Texas for a week, the band truly gave it their all on the upstairs stage, banging away on tunes from their most recent ‘Luge Lessons’ EP and songs that could very well likely show up on their upcoming debut album. The surf-y guitar lick of ‘Mean Heart’ plus singer Jamie Glass’ spirited vocals were a positive, loud and kick-arse way to end the weirdest (and unsettling) SXSW I’ve experienced yet. Until next year, see ya Austin…

 

SXSW 2016: part of Paradigm Agency showcase at Maggie Mae’s, plus the second half of BBC Introducing (Wednesday night, part 2) – 16th March 2016

 
By on Monday, 4th April 2016 at 4:00 pm
 

After a sombre, less than thrilling start to my Wednesday evening thinking about Viola Beach and seeing two acts at Music from Ireland, it was time to move on. Thanks to my upgraded press status at SXSW 2016 this year (thank you, Elizabeth and SXSW Music!), I could jump the massive queue that went down 6th Street to get into Maggie Mae’s. I managed to catch most of Drowners’ set on the downstairs indoor stage.

Drowners were not a band I was familiar with until I happened to see their name on the SXSW shout list for this year. Their name rung a bell; I seemed to remember getting an email about them a long while back, but I couldn’t remember why I hadn’t listened to their music before. Upon further investigation, it all made sense: their eponymous debut album for Frenchkiss Records was released in January 2014, right around the time I suffered the loss of an important friendship, so it’s unlikely I would have enjoyed the album at the time anyway. During pre-SXSW preparations in late January, it tickled me pink to find a band whose own name came from a Suede song (‘The Drowners’), as Suede had just released ‘Night Thoughts’ and I was experiencing the resurgence of my love for Brett Anderson and co

While Drowners are based in New York City and is therefore considered an American band, much has been made about their Welsh frontman Matthew Hitt having made his way to the Big Apple in the first place to pursue a career in modelling. Their music is good time rock ‘n’roll and Strokes-y. But it’s also got a feeling of more pop with pomp. especially on their recently revealed single ‘Cruel Ways’, which will appear on their second album ‘On Desire’, due out in June. Their appearances this week in Austin gave them the opportunity to test out the new material, including LP tracks ‘Human Remains’, ‘Someone Else is Getting In’ and ‘Conversations with Myself’. Of the new material, the bass-heavy thuds of set closer ‘Pick Up the Pace’ won me over.

Drowners at Paradigm Agency showcase at Maggie Mae's, Wednesday night at SXSW 2016

Another great thing that I reiterate time and time again about SXSW is the fact that 99% of the acts who aren’t Drake or CHVRCHES will play multiple shows. So if you happen to miss a band at their first appearance, you’ll have a second (and quite possibly a third or fourth) chance to see them again. As I had to leave the British Music Embassy at Latitude 30 early on Tuesday night to make it in time for Gold Class at the felte / Part Time Punks showcase at Barracuda at midnight, I missed seeing Liverpool’s Clean Cut Kid who were on after Oscar. Though it pained me to miss Gwenno at the Heavenly Recordings showcase at Barracuda, I was able to finally see both her and Stealing Sheep on Friday at the Cerdd Cymru afternoon showcase at Latitude 30 (stay tuned for that post).

Frontman Mike Halls of Clean Cut Kid has a beard that rivals Guy Connelly’s of Clock Opera. One wonders if the two bands will ever tour together, given this kinship of over the top, yet well maintained extended facial hair. Halls, with the very tattooed Saul Godman on bass guitar, look like they could be in a metal band. This makes the kind of music that Clean Cut Kid play – driving and fun indie pop – all the more incongruous. (I will say, however, that both of them have fantastic chops on their axes, especially Halls on his guitar solos, making me think that perhaps they were in a hard rocking band in the not too distant past.) Mike’s wife Evelyn on keyboards and her voice in harmony with him add another level of flair and uniqueness to the band’s music; I appreciated the perfection in their male plus female harmonies, something I didn’t otherwise hear all week at SXSW.

Clean Cut Kid at Paradigm Agency showcase at Maggie Mae's, Wednesday night at SXSW 2016

Though they came to Austin as virtual unknowns – and I’m almost positive no-one in Maggie Mae’s besides me had any idea who they were – the foursome quickly got the crowd, which steadily increased in size as their set went on, on their side. Despite the appearance of being unapproachable, Mike Halls is a likeable frontman, making jokes about how the word vitamin is pronounced in England vs. America (note: it’s different) and prefacing songs with deadpan comments such as “this is a hate song by a man who used to be in love” (not sure what song he was referring to!). ‘Pick Me Up’ is the Liverpool group at its finest and surely will continue Halls’ assertion that chicks dig beards”.

It was time to return to Latitude 30 and relieve Carrie of her place at the BBC Introducing / PRS for Music Foundation night. She had been there for the Viola Beach tribute, Isaac Gracie and Billie Marten, and it was my turn to cover the second half of the night. Following Marten were Steve Lamacq’s tip as Britain’s next great guitar band, The Sherlocks. If you’ve spent any time in Sheffield or indeed, you’ve had a listen to any number of their indie bands in the last 10 years, you have an idea of the Sheffield sound.

The Sherlocks at BBC Introducing PRS Foundation showcase, Latitude 30 Wednesday night at SXSW 2016

Of the biggest bands out of the Steel City, Arctic Monkeys are the most obvious of touchstones to the Sherlocks’ music. Given that Alex Turner and his mates have decided to follow the path of Josh Homme before them, it does seem that there’s an inescapable void where the Monkeys once trod, and the Sherlocks are a good fit for that void. Young, hard working and hungry for success, and as one of their songs are named and possessing a ‘Heart of Gold’, they certainly earned their moment under the lights at Latitude 30 this night.

After talking to Carrie about her experiences earlier at the BBC Introducing night, it sounds like Berkshire singer/songwriter Frances was much more confident and ready for her turn in the spotlight than earlier young female performer Billie Marten. The redhead was smiley and chatty, her stage patter between songs telling us more about herself and how her songs came to be, overall making a very engaging performance. Unlike Rosie Carney at the Music from Ireland showcase earlier in the evening, she was having a great time at SXSW.

Frances at BBC Introducing PRS Foundation showcase, Latitude 30 Wednesday night at SXSW 2016

Frances’ voice is beautiful, as was demonstrated on her newest single ‘Don’t Worry About Me’ performed live. But her versatility shines through on the soulful ‘Borrowed Time’, written with Howard Lawrence of Disclosure, who Frances insisted, and with a wide grin, was “wicked” and “he’s cooler than me!” While it makes my heart sink slightly that a talented lady like her feels the need to have songwriting collaborators (or more likely, her major label has that need), Frances’ vocal talent will take her far.

ESTRONS at BBC Introducing PRS Foundation showcase, Latitude 30 Wednesday night SXSW at 2016

The final act of the night was Welsh band ESTRONS, who realistically should have been on earlier in the lineup. Their sound is the result of frenetic playing and even at 1 AM in the morning, they showed no sign of slowing down. Bolstered by their uncompromising frontwoman Taliesyn Kallström, their brashness would have waken up the dead. Time to say goodnight to Radio 1’s Huw Stephens skulking round the back, to get a few hours of sleep and be back in town in good time the next morning to do it all over again.

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

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