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Video of the Moment #938: Beth Jeans Houghton and the Hooves of Destiny

 
By on Saturday, 25th August 2012 at 6:00 pm
 

Beth Jeans Houghton and the Hooves of Destiny‘s new video for ‘Dodecahedron’ (try saying that five times fact) is just plain creepy. And I’m not just talking about the trailer park. If you are not fond of reptiles of the legless variety, I’d recommend you steer clear of this promo. Seriously. It’s not worth the nightmares.

The single will be released on the 8th of October on Mute.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImiWoDQIOf4[/youtube]

 

Deer Shed Festival 2012 Review (Part 1)

 
By on Wednesday, 1st August 2012 at 2:00 pm
 

If required to choose three bands to invite to the apocryphal desert island for a night’s entertainment, one would be hard pressed to come up with a bill more satisfying than Moody Gowns, Janice Graham Band and Dutch Uncles. It is with a heavy heart, then, that I report that that superb line-up is exactly what I missed on Friday night at this year’s Deer Shed festival. Due to a combination of not being able to cut work early, having to perform a new tent’s virgin erection, and putting a little one to sleep in the big outdoors for the first time, the fantasy triumvirate was heard somewhat faintly from distance, and then only with the wavering consent of a fickle breeze.

When the dewy arena was finally breached, Saint Etienne were halfway through their headline set. Sadly, what sounded like a 120dB piledriver interrupted several songs, clearly deafening Sarah Cracknell and dampening what should have been a pillowy ride of joyous gossamer pop. However, no sooner had the main stage shut for the night, then a motley crew of folky songsters took up residence at the back of the ale tent, and kept everyone dancing in a happy, beery fug for until the wee small hours. Local brewers Daleside had come up with a signature Deer Shed ale; a fine drop which by rights required several tastings to reveal its true complexity of flavour. Fuelled by this and several sets of quality Celtic-tinged folk, the tent was still buzzing as TGTF meandered tentwards way past bedtime.

A quick word about the camping areas: in comparison to more populous events, Deer Shed has more camping space than campers, meaning that pretty much everyone gets to rent their own decent plot of prime grassy real estate for the weekend. I saw no cramped camping, except for those groups who chose to pitch together of free will. There were just about enough portaloos, and they were kept clean all weekend; no into-the-pit-of-Hades bravery required. Most campers were respectful of the need for quiet in the family camping, except for one group of morons who insisted on playing terrible songs on an out-of-tune acoustic guitar in the early hours of Sunday morning. Note to them: we’re here to hear professional, world-class musicians. Nobody wants to hear your sad, honking version of ‘Sonnet’ at 1am, you antisocial pricks. Family camping is for families, which implies children and parents getting some much-needed sleep. Children without their parents, like yourselves, should pitch up in regular camping, where your behaviour might be slightly more tolerated. /rant.

Saturday morning dawned with blazing sunshine, the like of which hadn’t been seen all year, adding to the discernibly special atmosphere which would develop over the course of the weekend. Dominated by a vintage Ferris wheel, and looking even better in the sunshine as it had in the dusk the previous night, the arena is simply one large field with facilities dotted around the edge, and the eponymous deer shed up in one corner, behind the main stage. Such is the compact nature of the site, one is never more than 5 minutes’ walk away from any particular attraction, making long drags from one band to another a thing of the past. A stroke of scheduling genius means that as soon as a performance finishes on the main stage, another starts in the tent directly opposite, making for a pretty much continuous flow of music. Ace.

There was so much other stuff going on at Deer Shed, it hardly seems appropriate to call it a music festival: festival with music sounds more accurate. However, this is a music site, so the bands will be reviewed properly. Please note: the nature of attending a festival with kids means that their needs come first; sometimes one has to skip a much-anticipated performance if a little one needs to be fed, changed, or put to bed. If an act is missing from this review, assume that they were missed out of necessity rather than choice. That being said, there was so much on offer, one never felt short-changed. First up, Washington Irving wake everyone up with their Scottish guitar-folk – think bedmates of Admiral Fallow, or moments of Travis on a good day with flutes and big harmony moments. A mellow, widescreen set: the sound of setting sail from Tobermory under an autumn sunrise.

A quick, 1-minute nip to the In The Dock tent, and it’s Woodenbox. These guys boast a mini horn section, just the ticket to jazz up their funkily-loping, ska-jumping sound (the band themselves call it Mariachi-folk). Kicking off with the darkly immense, New Orleans-jazz-infused ‘Everyone Has Their Price’, the tent was bouncing, straight off the bat. Several pieces off their EP ‘The Vanishing Act’ later, it was clear just what a powerful act Woodenbox are. Just two performances in, and the ‘New Band Of The Festival’ award already has a strong nomination.

Via an (un)holy combination of Glastonbury’s Emerging Talent competition and Mumford’s Ben Lovett’s Communion label, we have Treetop Flyers. Whilst they are perfectly fine entertainment in a laid-on-a-sunny-blanket-with-a-pint-of-cider way, one cannot help but think they’re simply a mashup Southern Gothic tribute band – there’s Crosby, Stills and Nash in plain earshot, and indeed plenty of Young in Reid Morrison’s voice. Utterly competent stuff, and possibly the next best thing to seeing Young in person. But when you’ve been exposed to the visceral, feedbacked intensity of a guitar-breaking performance by Young himself, utterly competent doesn’t quite cut it any more.

Laki Mera are in an entirely different league of originality – their sound is both electronic and organic, vintage synths vying with acoustic instruments and the silky tones of Laura Donnelly (pictured above and at top). Comparisons can be made (Massive Attack, Cocteau Twins, Bonobo); however the band have a sound entirely their own: each piece is crafted into a proper song, and it’s simply gorgeous to listen to. Donnelly herself is an excellent frontwoman, shaking her long hair with abandon, and emoting into the middle of next week. Chilled and powerful at the same time, Laki Mera are yet more evidence of the exciting music pouring out of Scotland at the moment.

Beth Jeans Houghton took the main stage attired in a natty purple leotard, tights fresh with mud from the previous day’s show, and proceeded to romp through most of this year’s ‘Yours Truly, Cellophane Noise’ released on Mute Records. Such singular material needs no introduction – indeed, no explanation is possible – suffice to say the performance was polished, if a little aloof. Perhaps familiarity has dulled Houghton’s enthusiasm for the songs, or the band are a little gigged-out, having been treading the boards for months on end now. It seems a reasonable guess that her character being as it is, BJH is far happier exploring new avenues and trying out novel material than playing the same set over and over. Such are the trials of pop stars.

Ah, Field Music. How on Earth such subtle, cerebral, detail-heavy, music can be delivered in such an exciting, danceable manner really is one of the small miracles of modern times. The band stick to the format of this spring’s ‘Plumb’ launch gigs, the opening movement of which introduces today’s set. A handful of favourites close it (‘Just Like Everyone Else’ is truly sublime live, a companion mood piece to The Beatles’ ‘I Want You (She’s So Heavy)’). Sandwiched are a few favourites from albums gone by – ‘In Context’ jerks its way into the audience’s feet, the whole performance is warmly received, and judging by post-festival Facebook comments, Field Music deliver the set of the weekend. Weighing up the combination of perfect musicianship, strong, unique, material, and the Brewis brothers’ own easygoing manner, it’s difficult to disagree.

Stay tuned for part 2 of Martin’s experience at Deer Shed Festival, which will post tomorrow.

 

Great Escape 2012: Final thoughts and Day 3 Evening Roundup – 12th May 2012

 
By on Thursday, 31st May 2012 at 1:00 pm
 

After a happy meetup with my NYC PR friend Marni and some finger food from the final press reception of this year’s Great Escape, I was on my own again. As a wheat allergy sufferer, finding food to go can be a bit of a challenge; for example, pasties aren’t too good for my body, and neither are sandwiches. I can have an occasional hamburger bun, but I try to avoid bread and pasta where I can. Knowing I had hours ahead of me for my last night at the festival, I decided to duck into the Yo Sushi! across the street from the Hub that I’d been eyeing for days. After a particularly unsuccessful time – I guess Brighton’s locals aren’t fans of raw fish, as I only managed 2 plates of salmon sushi after sitting there for 40 minutes – I up and went. Gutted.

My evening had to be restructured entirely on the announcement that Reverend and the Makers would no longer be supporting Africa Express Soundsystem, so to this day I still have yet to set foot and cover a show in the Dome. Next year. I had a difficult choices to make: I sadly had to give a pass to Perfume Genius at St. Mary’s Church because there was no way I’d get back up to the Pavilion Theatre and get in successfully for Beth Jeans Houghton and the Hooves of Destiny, a band I’d circled in red early on as a must see. Then there was some confusion in my mind who I should see before then. In a fit of slight desperation, I started reading the band descriptions in my now dog-eared schedule book for some guidance. I’d heard of Fanzine and thought maybe going to see Novella the band before them, might be interesting. Maybe. “Encountering drone and dream-pop with the same glassy-eyed nonchalance, London trio Novella may seem dazed, but their grass-roots credentials prove they’re far from confused.” They had also graced the Dome prior to Maximo Park’s appearance on Thursday night, so I thought, hmm, that’s a plan.

The Audio sign was relatively easy to find. I breathed a sigh of relief. However, a mix of drunk stag party participants spilling out on the pavement and actual festival goers made for bewilderment requiring me to ask the two bald guys out front for help. I don’t know what is up with most of the bouncers that work the Great Escape, but geez, when a woman comes and asks you a question nicely, is it so hard to answer truthfully and without nastiness or sarcasm? I got another “there’s no way in hell you’re getting in there” kind of response. Then I asked about Above Audio. “Oh, you can go right in there. There’s no queue.” Now you’re talking my language.

Funnily enough, Above Audio was where my mate Ed and his mates had gathered. “You’re not going to like this very much,” he commented about the first act up and Brighton locals Regal Safari. He meant because they’re chillwave, and this is true, I’m not a fan of that genre. But perhaps it was all the alcohol that was flowing, but I quite enjoyed their style of dance music so much I could feel my feet, though sore, still itching to move to the beat. After the set, my friends soon departed but I wasn’t alone for long.

Suddenly it was Blog Up all over again when Shell Zenner, Mike Bradford of the Recommender, Robin of Breaking More Waves and I found ourselves in the same patch of club space. Seriously, given the number of shows happening at that very moment in Brighton, what are the odds? (Also, how do we NOT have a single photo?!?) We exchanged advice and moans of conflicts remaining for our weekends and at Robin’s advice, I stayed for Gold and Youth, a Canadian band Paul Lester has compared to Depeche Mode. They’re an electronic band but in the ‘80s sense that seems to be a nostalgic bent a lot of bands are trying to ape. Not sure if I agree with their label Arts and Crafts’ description of “neo-noir Los Angeles, cinematic haze and midnight solitudes”. But there is a definite dark, brooding nature that history has shown works extremely well with industrial synth action going hand to hand with great songwriting, and if this one performance is anything to go by, I think this band – now augmented with a female singer and bassist! – will be going places. Watch some live videp of the band below. (Sorry for the guy who was walking back and forth in front of the camera; that was their roadie and I was already taking my chances standing on the stage…that said, I have to say that I love the fact that in most UK venues, you can video as much as you please. Not the way with American venues…)

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MQaxepsYXqk[/youtube]

I am sure it is quite ironic, seeing that I’m an American, that I’ve not seen Howler live before. However, I shouldn’t have even bothered to head to Komedia, as it felt like the whole of Brighton descended on that very venue’s upstairs for Alabama Shakes. (Zzz.) Should I tell you what the bouncer there said to me? I should. (Incidentally, he is the same bouncer that took a horrible photo of me with the Crookes that morning and demanded 5 quid for his trouble. Very funny.) I asked where Komedia upstairs was. “You’re not getting in, it’s one in, one out now.” (Please keep in mind that I had arrived an hour before Howler was due on stage, and nearly 3 hours before Alabama Shakes’ set time.) I asked if this was the line he was giving every single punter who asked (insinuating he was just putting out false information). He gave a stern look. “No, I’ve been saying that all night to compensate for my small penis.” And there you have it, folks.

You really can’t follow that up with anything else, so I asked how the capacity for the Komedia’s Studio Bar. Wordlessly, he pointed his bald head in the direction of the door. I have no idea why Komedia downstairs doesn’t put on shows at night – they have the space, so they should, why not? – but after getting a little lost (admittedly still buzzed from the cider imbibed at Above Audio) I finally made it to catch the last couple songs of JD McPherson, who is best described as a white man having a go at being Little Richard and succeeding. After the disappointment of not getting into Howler, this was an impressive find and unlike anything I expected to hear at the Great Escape this year. I imagined this must have been the way the Beatles felt when they first heard ‘Tutti Frutti’. Watch his video for ‘North Side Gal’ below.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aZGn4LncY0g[/youtube]

I gave up the illusion I was getting close enough to take photos; the bar was packed full of sweaty revelers who hooted their approval for their new god. It might not have been the most inventive or original music at the festival, but who cares when you’ve got a whole room of very happy people? I was situated in the back, next to a group of girls in cute dresses and flower headband contraptions that must have taken forever to arrange. When I inquired – successfully – if they were part of a hen party and went on to declare my admiration for their outfits, I got hugs all around. Apparently they had not been treated well by the festival punters they’d spoken to, who had all declared that they were there specifically to get pissed. Their spokeswoman quickly clarified to me that it was the bride to be’s request that her hen do take place around the Great Escape because music is so important to her. That’s it. You’ve all been informed. When I’m getting married, I’m having my hen do around a music festival. That’s the way to do it!

Seeing that I had been thwarted on getting in on the venue Howler was playing way before the fact, I decided it was probably best if I stopped swanning about and headed to the Pavilion Theatre, where I would stay for the night. Not really sure how queues work for this place; maybe they counted everyone in the downstairs bar in the capacity? I arrived at the Club Uncut stage with the room half full, people sitting cross-legged on the floor while Hans Chew played. Jazz and blues are not my forte, unless there’s a definite rock ‘n’ roll edge to it (see JD McPherson above), and while he and his guitarist sounded well matched, I wasn’t feeling it.

I had another band to sit through, but “sit through” is the wrong phrase to use, because they actually got me up and hopping. Solar Bears, a Irish electronic duo, brought the beats and had me and my new friends (friends who actually enjoyed Django Django the night before and were being respectful and not shouting at each other!) and I were dancing up a storm. Yes, there were people being stupid and sitting on the floor still, but man, it was their loss. Apparently film scores and soundtracks play a big part in their musical upbringing, but I enjoyed what I considered a quite dynamic and fun electronic music experience.

Beth Jeans Houghton and the Hooves of Destiny. Ooh. I don’t think I was adequately prepared. I was disappointed they weren’t dressed up in multi-coloured outfits. But Beth herself explained to the audience that they had just come back from a tour of Europe and were exhausted, and she was wearing a t-shirt that belonged to a bandmate and after a cursory nasal check, announced that it smelled. (Er…TMI.) When people say a woman’s voice sounds like a songbird, I usually am let down when I finally hear the woman and find she sounds nothing like a bird. Beth Jeans Houghton doesn’t sound like a bird but her operatic tones give any bird on a tree near you a run of its money. On paper, you’d think that her style of singing wouldn’t work in the pop environment, and that’s where you would be wrong. But listen to a bit of the live performance of below and decide for yourself.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4BsOa7GiSgA[/youtube]

EMA followed with a down and dirty, grungey sound. And she had props! What looked like a hollowed out mirrorball hung from Erika M. Anderson’s mike stand. And for ‘Angelo’, she festooned herself with strings of lit Christmas lights; if you don’t believe me, watch the video below.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWF6OvwOQuk[/youtube]

And that’s how my Great Escape ended, hanging with new friends and checking out a band I knew little about. Both things are what this festival was about. And I feel incredibly lucky I got to experience it this year, see 21 bands, and interview the Crookes. I feel quite isolated and alone in Washington, so something very special about the Great Escape was that it gave me the chance to meet so many bloggers and people involved in the music business in the welcoming realm of UK music that it gives me a fuzzy feeling just thinking about it. Same time, next year? Make mine a Kopparberg pear cider and I’ll see you down the front.

 

Preview: Evolution Emerging 2012

 
By on Thursday, 24th May 2012 at 9:00 am
 

There’s not long to go before Evolution Festival, held on the quaysides of Gateshead and Newcastle upon Tyne over the Queen’s Jubilee weekend. To supplement the main festival, those who prefer their acts a little more underground can rejoice: Evolution Emerging – being put on with North East music supporter Generator, alongside Amazing Radio and Narc. Magazine – takes place on the Friday before the festival proper, taking over the cultural mecca that is the Ouseburn Valley, just a stone’s throw away from the main site. Several venues are dedicated to showcasing the best in North-East talent, with a sprinkling of proper royalty at the head of the bill: local lass Beth Jeans Houghton and her Hooves Of Destiny (pictured above), whose star has gone stratospheric in 2012 in response to their debut album ‘Yours Truly, Cellophane Nose’.

Other sources might argue that the bill is too long to preview properly. Not us. Exclusive to TGTF, here is a venue-by-venue run-down of who to watch, who to miss, and who to dance alone with your top off to, conveniently in the style of Live and Kicking’s low-brow musical critique spot Hit, Miss, or Maybe. Clearly there is far more to see than can be seen, unless one is in possession of a Tardis, so at the end there will be a clear recommendation of how to spend one’s Evo Emerging evening wisely, maximising exposure to great new music. Here we gan…

Cluny
Beth Jeans Houghton – needs no introduction. HIT! [Post-Great Escape, Mary heartily concurs. – Ed.]
Lulu James – does trip-hop make a comeback with this darkly-styled songstress? HIT!
Deerhart – Trev’s mahogany voice can’t paper over the maudlin, lengthy arrangements and clichéd lyrics. MISS.
Boy Jumps Ship – American FM radio polished garage rock, no space to breathe. HIT!
Eeves – Going nowhere fast. Song Silhouette nearly five minutes long – post-punk? Not. MISS.
Total = 3/5 = 60%

Cluny 2
Fantasy Rainbow – classy twee-pop troubadourism from Gateshead. What’s not to like? HIT!
Natasha Haws – foetal, sparse singer-songwriter with pain in her heart. She could use some warmth – could you be the one? MAYBE?
Amy Holford – despite being yet another acoustic singer-songwriter, voice has the power to amaze. MAYBE?
Let’s Away – brilliant dreamy arch-pop from the musical honeypot that is Sunderland. Bottom of the bill for not much longer. HIT!
Total = 3/4 = 75%

The Tyne
We Are Knuckle Dragger – like being repeatedly kicked in the brain. Resistance is futile. HIT!
Nately’s Whore’s Kid Sister – dirges for slothly moshers. MAYBE?
O’Messy Life – jaunty arms-wide-open guitar pop, best band name ever. BULLSEYE!
Acrobatic Society – completely mental avant-garde drone-pop. Drugs essential. MAYBE?
The Watchers – 60s guitar pop, 70s psychedelic trips, 90s baggy, 2012 movers and shakers. HIT!
Total = 4.5/5 = 90%

The Tanners
Bird Island – self-assured American-influenced guitar pop. Get that top down and go for a drive. HIT!
Iceni – underdeveloped piano-led jazz-pop. MISS.
Reckoner – nothing of any note online. MISS.
Ben Watson – nothing of any note online. MISS.
Total = 1/4 = 25%

The Cumberland Arms
Symphonic Pictures – superbly funky psychedelic alt-pop. HIT!
Collectors Club – Teesside youngsters with the catchiest products this side of a north sea trawler. HIT!
Lilliput – utterly sublime folk-pop from windswept Wearsiders. Desolation, beauty, cups of tear. BULLSEYE!
Crooked Hands – minimalist instrumentation, cracked vocals, gently beautiful. HIT!
Total = 4.5/4 = 112.5%

Star & Shadow Cinema (afterparty)
Young Liar – mute, melodic, hard-hitting. Newcastle’s answer to Mogwai. HIT!
Weird Shapes – obscurantist neophiles with their head in the clouds. Could hold the answer to life, the universe and everything. HIT!
Apollo Gets The Girl – the love between Chris Lowe and Nicolas Winding Refn as soundtracked by a Yamaha SY77. Simultaneously classy and cheesy, like a Parisian croque monsieur. MAYBE?
Ghosts Of Old Berlin – as architectural and stark as the name suggests, nevertheless display a strange beauty. MAYBE?
Total = 3/4 = 75%

Scores on the doors
Cluny – 60%
Cluny 2 – 75%
The Tyne – 90%
The Tanners – 25%
The Cumberland Arms – 112.5%
Star & Shadow (afterparty) – 75%

Summary
The Tanners’ sparse musical offerings mirror its outlying geographical location – an uphill struggle. Bird Island are the only reason to venture there, and I suspect few will bother, unluckily for them. The central Ouseburn offerings are all strong, with The Tyne showcasing a particularly strong line-up. But the Cumberland is the clear winner here. All four acts are superb, and a canny punter will ensconce themselves in a comfy chair in the corner and nurse several pints as the night unfolds. Beth Jeans Houghton is undoubtedly the biggest name of the event as a whole, and will attract the biggest audience – all the better to thin the crowd at the modestly-sized Cumberland, for those who wish to see acts who are genuinely emerging. Not all of them can be stars of tomorrow, but I’d put good money on one of these acts becoming a household name within twelve months. Be there to see it happen.

Under the cut: an interactive poster for Evo Emerging.
Continue reading Preview: Evolution Emerging 2012

 

Video of the Moment #750: Beth Jeans Houghton and the Hooves of Destiny

 
By on Friday, 30th March 2012 at 6:00 pm
 

Here’s the new video from Beth Jeans Houghton and the Hooves of Destiny for their song ‘Atlas’. It seems to espouse the wisdom “life, including chess and playing with pet rabbits, goes on the morning after a bender.” Watch it below and have a nice weekend.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=82t0vx-U9d4[/youtube]

 

Luke’s Alphabet Tour – B: Beth Jeans Houghton and the Hooves of Destiny at London Garage – 2nd February 2012

 
By on Wednesday, 8th February 2012 at 2:00 pm
 

Letter B is Beth Jeans Houghton‘s latest project…

Outside it feels like even a penguin would catch a chill, but inside the Garage the temperature is rising from the early arrivals to HMV’s Next Big Thing gig at one of London’s best-loved venues. Downstairs Reckless Love are no doubt giving the city’s rock contingent a bloody good seeing to, but upstairs it’s time for the indie fans to witness some of the finest new music on offer in 2012.

Opening this Thursday night showcase are the London indie-folk duo Olfar. The sombre, dual vocals float over the gradually growing crowd who unfortunately don’t appear as receptive as the boy/girl combo hoped. ‘Sailing the Wreck’ wins over a few down the front but the obvious passion emanating from the stage simply doesn’t resonate with those in attendance. The powerful vocal harmonies sadly aren’t harnessed to full effect as frontman Oli Deakin takes over voice duties for the majority of the set. Closing on the title track from their latest album (available for just £1 on Bandcamp) the mood shifts and Olfar suddenly seem at home onstage playing their blend of bass-y acoustic dream pop. Just as quickly as Olfar find their feet, the proverbial rug is pulled from under them by the truly wonderful Kyla La Grange.

The tremendously big-sounding quintet – fronted by the petite, yet powerful Kyla – produce a beautifully melodic, dancey beat to the delight of London. They mix slower, emotional numbers with an array of up-beat, post-rock influenced soundscapes. With a vocal range akin to Régine Chassange of Arcade Fire, the three-quarters full venue have almost forgotten about Olfar after this incredible display. Next single ‘Vampire Smile’ gets all five band members playing their hearts out in an amalgamation of big instrumentals, heavy bass and a soaring voice. Rounding their slot off on the flawless ‘Catalyst’, a huge heartfelt ballad filled with whimsy and emotion that’s in grave danger of stealing the night. But not if Beth Jeans Houghton has anything to do about it.

Known for being both eccentric and quirky, Beth Jeans Houghton and the Hooves of Destiny give a somewhat toned down performance. Starting with a colourful display of power-pop and indie rhythms, the momentum slows and stutters as the young Houghton seems overcome with the abundance of industry bods judging her every move. Despite crowd-interaction not being her strong point (excluding the comment about that funny eels picture which earned a titter from rampant internet users), Houghton’s voice strings create a harmonious warble that fills the room a la Zola Jesus. The operatic overtones give the music an anthemic twist with an almost 80s soft rock feel. Smashing their way through ‘Lilliput’ and ‘Telephone’, the highlight comes from ‘I Will Return I Promise’. A certain Irish knees-up vibe blasts out of the PA system as Beth and her Hooves manage to get the so-far immovable objects down front dancing.

It might not have been her best performance but with a new album out in a few days (6 February), expect to see more of this group of synthesised minstrels throughout the year. Surely the best is yet to come.

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

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