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Live Gig Video: Titus Andronicus share full concert film of live album ‘S+@DIUM ROCK: FIVE NIGHTS AT THE OPERA’

 
By on Thursday, 4th August 2016 at 4:00 pm
 

A year and a week ago, New Jersey rockers Titus Andronicus played a 5-night series of sold out shows at the iconic Brooklyn venue Shea Stadium. The live album taken from recordings from the gig series have now been released on Merge Records as ‘S+@DIUM ROCK: FIVE NIGHTS AT THE OPERA’. To celebrate this momentous release and to provide video accompaniment to the audio experience, the band have also released a full concert film with footage taken from these shows. The live experience has been dutifully “captured in such vivid detail” so that “devotees can relive their favourite concert memories from the comfort of their own homes.” Makes sense to me. Enjoy the full film below. For more on Titus Andronicus on TGTF, right this way, ladies and gents.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owfVuC56iPE[/youtube]

 

MP3 of the Day #893: MONEY

 
By on Tuesday, 12th January 2016 at 10:00 am
 

Emotionally cutting Manchester band MONEY will be releasing their sophomore album later this month. ‘Suicide Songs’, their second LP, will be out on the 29th of January on Bella Union, and the album closes with a song with a weighty title: ‘A Cocaine Christmas and an Alcoholic’s New Year’. As part of the promotion for the new album, the band are giving away a live version of the track, recorded live last November 2015 at Salford’s White Hotel, as a free mp3. You can listen to the track alone and download it for your own collection in the SoundCloud embed below, and if you want the full experience, you can also watch the live performance of the song from where the mp3 was taken directly below it.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OecJg2lav34[/youtube]

 

(SXSW 2016 flavoured!) Live Gig Video: The Crookes get dirty and dusty in ‘The World is Waiting’

 
By on Monday, 11th January 2016 at 4:00 pm
 

Last summer, The Crookes announced they were starting their own label, Anywhere Records, and 2016 sees their own first release with their new venture. ‘Lucky Ones’ will be out on the 29th of January on Anywhere Records and Modern Outsider in the US, which is fortuitous timing, as they’ve been announced to appear for a fourth time in Austin in SXSW 2016 in March.

They revealed the new LP’s first single ‘I Wanna Waste My Time on You’ last September; watch the video for the single in this previous Video of the Moment feature. The second single to be unveiled from the album ‘The World is Waiting’, which fits into the new release’s upbeat nature. Filmed in someone’s back garden, this happy feeling is mirrored in the party atmosphere in the song’s accompanying promo, in drinks, fags and…colored dust? Yes, really. Watch it below.

The Crookes will be out on the road in the UK in February to support ‘Lucky Ones’ prior to SXSW. Read our extensive archive on the Crookes on TGTF this way.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZn8ivXYmxs[/youtube]

 

Goodbye 2015, our hearts may be battered, but we’re still keen… (Happy holidays from TGTF!)

 
By on Thursday, 24th December 2015 at 5:00 pm
 

For my editor round-up of the best albums of 2015, go here. I also go into detail on my opinion of the state of the live music industry as shown this year in this post.

We’re gotten through another year, and gotten through it with heavy hearts. This year we had to contend with the newly branded with leathers Mumford and Sons headlining Reading and Leeds, and just yesterday, Ke$ha has premiered her new band, Yeast Infection (you can’t make this stuff up). On the much more serious side of things, our industry suffered a great tragedy in November in Paris when innocent music lovers were lost at the hands of religious zealots (I touched briefly on this here on TGTF the Monday after). As much as I dislike the direction U2 have gone in recent years, you have to give Bono props for addressing these senseless killings in song.

It has to be said, again and again, that the terrible actions of a few do not represent the majority, whose hearts are in the right place.

There’s a lot in this world that doesn’t make sense. But as positive thinkers say, keep putting positivity out in the world, and such positivity will come back to you. I am buoyed with word that vinyl sales are now stronger than ever, and not only people who grew up with 45s are the ones buying them. There rarely goes a few days now when I’m not invited to the latest vinyl fair. (BTW, in case you were wondering, TGTF Towers still does not have a working record player, so if any good people out there want to buy me something nice after all these years of being editor here, you’re welcome to. Ha.)

Millennials – who, because their eyes are permanently fixed on their smartphones, have been blasted for having no social skills (and yet they have no idea this is happening- are proving to be some of the most excited people at gigs I attend, and they’re the ones with allowances that can be spent on new music and t-shirts. As annoying as some of them might be, being pushy and shove-y down the front at the barrier, shouting high pitched in the street for One Direction or Ed Sheeran, and as hard as it might be swallow this nugget of truth, they’re the ones we have look to, to keep music alive. Have a thought on that this Christmas when you’re putting out the bins and you see a kid skipping down the street, in impossibly tight jeans, listening to music with headphones on. Sorry to point out the obvious, but that kid was once you.

Let’s make a commitment to go into this new year with peace and light. Happy Christmas to you and yours. Thank you to everyone who has supported this site this year and in years past, whether you’re a reader, band, PR, manager or anyone else involved in this crazy, yet always beguiling world we call the music business. We’ll see you back here in January.

 

Gig Observations of 2015: Editor’s Picks and Thoughts on the Live Music Industry

 
By on Tuesday, 22nd December 2015 at 11:00 am
 

Rather than choose my top 5 gigs of 2015 as I have done in previous years, I decided this time around, I needed to take a different tack, and for an important reason. I haven’t gone to that many shows this year. It wasn’t for lack of choice or opportunity, just various mitigating circumstances preventing me from what I wanted to do. Choosing shows, then, would be unfair to every band or act I missed because I couldn’t get their gig, through no fault of their own.

Instead, I’ve decided for 2015 I’d give an overview of how I view gigs now in this ever-changing music industry. In case you have somehow missed this development, please note: a significant portion of an artist’s income is now from touring profits. This makes it all the important to support your favourite bands when they come to your time, buy gig tickets and buy merch too if you can, as generally speaking, more of what they sell at the merch table is going directly into their pockets, and therefore towards their future music-making prospects, than other retailers you might be buying the same stuff from. If that isn’t possible, offer to buy the band drinks. Or bring them food and other tour provisions if the venue will allow it (check first). They’ll appreciate it. I once brought bananas to Peter, Bjorn and John at a 9:30 Club show (now that I think about it, I have no idea how I got them past security) because John asked for them on Twitter.

One of my favourite gigs in 2015 was outside America. While it’s true that you would think I’d automatically have fonder memories of shows away from home while on holiday, it turns out that it’s the people I met at the shows that made the most difference. I would be making a terrible sweeping generalisation if I said all security in America’s clubs are gruff, mean and unreasonable (they’re not), the clubs where I have faced ridiculous behaviour stick out as places I avoid. But when people at a venue go out of their way to be nice to me, I remember.

The Staves at Dublin Olympia, 6 May 2015

Case in point: Robbie, a bouncer at Dublin’s Olympia, really didn’t have to be nice to me when I showed up to cover The Staves there in May. I was press like all the others in the pit. Yet he pointed out where I could leave my things during the show so I would not have to lug them around while taking photos, the dangerous bits of the pit where I might slip and fall, and how I might be able to access the venue wifi. I wasn’t herded like cattle or yelled at, which is an all too regular occurrence. I mean, seriously, which kind of bouncer would you prefer to deal with, when you’re there to do an important job? I had arrived early to scope out the pit and introduce myself so there wouldn’t be any issues, and there were none the entire night. In fact, we got into a very nice conversation about some mutual friends of ours (Kodaline and The Coronas) and he told me a story about the Script‘s early days performing there. Getting to hear such a story, in a location now forever famous thanks to the 2007 R.E.M. live album, was an unforgettable experience during my first visit to Ireland. I will always treasure the memories of that night.

2015 was also the year that Girls Against was founded, in reaction to more outspoken young girls bringing to public attention groping that has been taking place in crowds at shows. Massive props to Drenge, Peace and Slaves in particular for speaking out against and condemning such behaviour at shows. To me, this is the sort of anti-violence action (I’m not going to use “feminist”, I intensely dislike that word because that seems to indicate boys are immune to such vile acts) that is beneficial and is more effective than, say, the words of a popster. Maybe that’s just me.

Ride at 9:30 Club, 17 September 2015

Going back to my own personal live experiences year, another great night was somehow achieved with flying colours by, well, flying down the street. Ride, who had not played in North America for a very long time, had a great show at the 9:30 Club in September. Having heard that their ’90s contemporaries Jesus and the Mary Chain were complete bores, I was steeling myself for a similar experience. Not so. The show was a reminder to me – and all – that despite the inevitable ageing of rock stars, the music is still incredible, and most bands even when they past middle age are still excellent, excellent shouts. Perhaps they might not need as much of your money as the younger, fledgling bands, but they are certainly worth the money to go see and have a night out where you can support your local economy and nightlife.

My friend and I had to split before Ride’s encore, however, to go down the block and see my Welsh friends Until the Ribbon Breaks play at DC9. I’ve had a soft spot for Pete Lawrie and co. after seeing them win over crowds at SXSW 2014 and then smash it while closing the Music Wales night this year in Austin. To go from a 1,200-capacity, state of the art, two-floor club with massive balcony to a 200-capacity upstairs room really puts things in perspective, doesn’t it? Both shows were packed but both were also full of incredible energy. It reminded me it doesn’t really matter how big (or small) a crowd is, as long as the artist up on stage is giving it his/her/their all. That’s their art, and it’s our responsibility as fans to make sure they can keep doing what they’re doing.

Until the Ribbon Breaks at DC9, 17 September 2015

I would be remiss if I did not mention all the lovely people, bands, and artists I met in East Anglia for Norwich Sound and Vision. (All my coverage of the 3-day festival and accompanying conference can be found here.) It was my first time in that region of England and I was absolutely charmed by the city and by the kindness extended by everyone there. I highly recommend the experience to anyone wanting something to put on their calendar that’s much more relaxed where you actually feel human and you’re not running town to gigs and meetings like a crazy person! (Professionals: we all know what that’s like, right?) A special thank you to Adrian, Jenny and Dex for putting on such a remarkable event, and a very special thank you to Mark for tipping me off about it.

A final word. After the horrific events in Paris on the 13th of November (I wrote about this a bit back here), we have to keep going. I know it’s hard. I’m still shaken up by what’s happened, because some of the music fans we lost were friends and colleagues of friends. In 2016, more so than any other year in the past, I hope for more peace, love and understanding. Let’s commit ourselves to this. Through music we can stand together. And stay strong.

Peace out.

After the cut: the full list of all the gigs, in reverse chronological order, that I’ve been to in 2015.
Continue reading Gig Observations of 2015: Editor’s Picks and Thoughts on the Live Music Industry

 

Top Albums of 2015: Editor’s Picks

 
By on Monday, 21st December 2015 at 11:00 am
 

It’s definitely been a roller coaster of a year, full of highs and lows of surprises and emotional moments. So when it came time for me to sit down and consider which would be my top albums of 2015, the qualities I was looking for were a little different as they have been in the last 5 years I’ve offered my end of year choices. (To have a read of my best of lists in 2010-2014 while I’ve presided as Editor at TGTF, go here.)

While the following five albums all met my usual primary of criterion of, “will I listen to this album again and again in years to come?”, it was important to me this year, more than any other time in the past, to choose albums that I felt truly emotionally connected to that I feel that you, the readers, will feel too.

Fictonian Desire Lines cover1. Fictonian‘Desire Lines’ (Distiller Records)
Fictonian coverage on TGTF

When we approach the start of summer or winter, I get a nervous but inescapably excited feeling in the pit of my stomach, probably much like the feeling the members of the Academy Award nominee committee have as they head towards Christmas. To me, it should be a no-brainer that any album released during or right before summer should be written with the intention that one would listen to it blaring from an open-top convertible, just as the best released near the holidays should be the one you’re listening to with your loved ones while trimming the tree.

Glen Powers’ debut as Fictonian, ‘Desire Lines’ released in mid-November, definitely fits the bill for the latter. What makes ‘Desire Lines’ a stroke of brilliance is as its demonstration of Powers’ talent. It has moments of true beauty: you will want to hold close to your heart the smoky emotional haze of ‘I Remember’, gently tempered by the sweeping gorgeousness of more upbeat ‘Make It Be Ours’. This album was crafted lovingly in rural Herefordshire, and it shows.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBdkA6RjCcY[/youtube]

On the other side of the spectrum are the wonky melody of ‘Mrs. Jones’ and the playful rolling beats of ‘Little Black Book’, showing off the whimsical side of Fictonian songwriting. He’s the kind of artist you expect to be knocking back a couple of Oscars for best song or best score from a film chosen by that same committee I mentioned earlier. Suffice to say, I’m truly excited to hear more from him.

East India Youth Culture of Volume cover2. East India Youth‘Culture of Volume’ (XL Recordings)
East India Youth coverage on TGTF

Where do you go from a Mercury Prize nomination? Luckily for William Doyle, aka East India Youth, this wasn’t an issue: his sophomore album ‘Culture of Volume’ and the follow-up to last year’s hugely feted ‘Total Strife Forever’ was already written by the time Young Fathers were announced as the surprise winners of the industry gong in November 2014.

While we’ll never know for sure if the gravity of potentially winning the Mercury Prize looming over him would have made a difference in the finished product, ‘Culture of Volume’ will stand as an interesting milestone in East India Youth’s career because it’s so different – and refreshingly so – from his admittedly somewhat inaccessible Mercury-nominated debut.

Taking advantage of what I feel is one of his unsung strengths (no pun intended), the pop sensibility in Doyle’s voice shines like a beacon of light in the darkness of ‘Carousel’, and it’s impossible not feel the pain of leaving a lover in the words of ‘Turn Away’. He also indulged in his love for industrial techno in instrumental ‘Entirety’ after the pulse-pounding ‘Hearts That Never’, while also channeling the Pet Shop Boys in ‘Beaming White’. I’m alternately intrigued and terrified of what the third East India Youth album will sound like. The rumours indicate we’ll hear nothing until 2017, so we’ve got some time to wait.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcMnFLnYJuo[/youtube]

Public Service Broadcasting Race for Space cover3. Public Service Broadcasting‘The Race for Space’ (Test Card Recordings); Public Service Broadcasting coverage on TGTF

Novelty is still one of the unique characteristics distinguishing indie from mainstream music. Public Service Broadcasting first came to prominence to 6 Music listeners through the single ‘Spitfire’, a driving toe-tapper highlighting the British invention of a single-seat fighter plane developed for use in World War II, using archived footage from public information films from a bygone era. The song went on to appear on the duo’s ‘Inform – Educate – Entertain’, released on the act’s own Test Card Recordings. They became, in my mind, the poster boys for music for the thinking man.

In February, their second outing ‘The Race for Space’ cemented in the public consciousness Public Service Broadcasting’s ability to write a cohesive and impressive set of songs highlighting humankind’s innovation while looking towards the heavens. Russian (‘Sputnik’, ‘Gagarin’, ‘Valentina’) and American accomplishments (‘Go!’, ‘Tomorrow’) during the Cold War were equally lauded, and this is important to note, given the political climate we find ourselves in now. How incredible that music written with the help of propanganda clips, clips originally created to provoke nationalist sentiment, could be repurposed to applaud the human spirit? Fantastic.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wY-kAnvOY80[/youtube]

Cut Ribbons We Want to Watch Something We Loved Burn cover4. Cut Ribbons‘We Want to Watch Something We Loved Burn’ (Kissability)
Cut Ribbons coverage on TGTF

It’s a funny thing that in the year New Order decided to return with a new album (I know, I know, without Peter Hook), a far younger band from Wales came out with their own debut in the genre of synthpop that Bernard Sumner and co. were one of the vanguards of in the ‘80s. And totally obliterated any other competition they might have had in the same genre, adding anthemic and dream pop elements to further bolster their sound.

The booming bombast of slower tempoed, well restrained ‘Clouds’ provides a welcome contrast to the cardiovascular workout and title track ‘We Want to Watch Something We Loved Burn’. Overall, including ‘Walking on Wires’ below, this is an optimistic set of songs, that I appreciate as a jolt of sunniness during the darker times.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N17o0n0z84U[/youtube]

Broken Hands Turbulence cover5. Broken Hands‘Turbulence’ (SO Recordings)
Broken Hands coverage on TGTF

It might seem strange to go from the lightness of a synthpop album into the deep, dark recesses of a hard rock album, but stay with me here. Being a Led Zeppelin fan from way back, my hard rock litmus test is difficult to pass, because, Led Zep set the bar pretty high. As a result, it’s difficult for me to cosy up to just any hard rock band. They have to prove themselves to me, and Broken Hands has done just that with ‘Turbulence’.

A searing live rendition of ‘Meteor’ at SXSW 2014 melted my face, and its recorded version does not disappoint (have a watch and listen below), and neither does single ‘Who Sent You’. But this band is no one-trick pony, proven by the grandeur of surprising ballad ‘Impact’. Excellent stuff.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-SPlqsnghsY[/youtube]

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

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