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Video of the Moment #2910: Benjamin Francis Leftwich

 
By on Monday, 12th November 2018 at 6:00 pm
 

Earlier this year, London via Yorkshire singer/songwriter Benjamin Francis Leftwich released a new EP, ‘I Am With You’. Last week, he premiered the music video for ‘Gratitude’, a new single that has been taken from his upcoming third album. There’s precious little we know so far about the upcoming LP except that it’ll drop on Dirty Hit Records in early 2019. What we do know is that ‘Gratitude’ is a breathy, beautiful tune that swells to a choral crescendo at its conclusion. Watch and listen to the promo for ‘Gratitude’ below. Past coverage on Benjamin Francis Leftwich on TGTF is through here.

 

Video of the Moment #2909: Gengahr

 
By on Thursday, 8th November 2018 at 6:00 pm
 

Back in the March, Gengahr released their album ‘Where Wildness Grows’. In their effort to keep pushing boundaries, back in September, they released one-off single ‘Atlas Please’. It’s interesting in itself simply for who ended up producing it: Jack Steadman, frontman of Bombay Bicycle Club (you remember them). Although the single’s accompanying promo video has its moment of weirdness, as you might expect from this band based on previous visual efforts, I give them full props for including some truly stunning landscapes here. Watch the video for ‘Atlas Please’ below. Our full archive of Gengahr can be accessed through here.

 

Live Gig Video: Hatchie performs ‘Adored’ at Seattle’s Barbarosa

 
By on Thursday, 8th November 2018 at 4:00 pm
 

Australian dream pop singer/songwriter Hatchie, aka Harriette Pilbeam, has recently released a live video performance of her recent single ‘Adored’, from her show at Barbarosa in Seattle on the 19th of September. Filmed and edited by Trevor Crump, the video captures the essence of the song in live performance, including lighting, sound, and late night ambience. See it for yourself at the bottom of this page. Hatchie’s recently released EP ‘Sugar & Spice’ is available now via Double Double Whammy. Speaking of the song itself, Pilbeam says “‘Adored’ is a song that’s been floating around for a few years now, so I’m really excited it’s finally found its place with this release. I’ve been playing it live since my first show but didn’t feel it fit on either my [previous] EP or album. It’s about always wanting more than what you have, even if it’s perfect.”

Speaking of live performances, those of you on the UK side of the pond can catch Hatchie live at the beginning of next year, when she opens for The Vaccines in January and February 2019. You can find a full listing of Hatchie’s upcoming live dates on her official Facebook. TGTF’s previous coverage of Hatchie is right back here.

 

Live Review: IDLES at Dublin Button Factory – 22nd October 2018

 
By on Thursday, 8th November 2018 at 2:00 pm
 

Words by Gareth O’Malley

IDLES didn’t make it over here last time they were touring an album, which is why tonight’s set feels like an overdue celebration of last year as much as it does for their breakthrough record ‘Joy as an Act of Resistance’. The floodgates open not long after support act Heavy Lungs leave the stage. By the time IDLES arrive on the scene just after 9 PM and open their set with ‘Colossus’, anticipation has reached a fever pitch. The song’s first act is delivered at a pace that seems funereal compared to its recorded counterpart. Then, frontman Joe Talbot counts the five-piece back in for part two and the room finally ignites, the first few rows of the crowd on the floor seeming to move as one. It’s the sort of energetic release the band excel at, setting the bar for what is to come.

‘Colossus’ and ‘Never Fight a Man With a Perm’ are the opening salvo of a 19-song set, quickly followed by the politically-charged ‘Mother’ and ‘Faith in the City’ from ‘Brutalism’. Stage banter is kept to a minimum until the band are sure they have everyone in the room on side. “Are there any scumbags in the audience?” Talbot asks cheekily. A resounding cheer goes up by way of answer before he dedicates the next song to them. It is, of course, ‘I’m Scum’, and by the sounds of things, there are plenty of people here who are “lefty, soft, minimum wage job” as the song puts it. ‘Danny Nedelko’ is dedicated by Talbot to “those people here who are not from here, those immigrants that make the world a better place” before the band tear through the song and are almost drowned out by the crowd in the process. Five mics on stage struggle to compete with a thousand-strong crowd roaring back a song that has seemingly come to mean a lot to people in a very short time.

Everyone in the room seems to have brought their best selves to tonight’s show, with Ireland praised for its selection of ‘really good Dairy Milk’ by Talbot before powerhouse drummer Jon Beavis introduces the deliberately overblown ‘Gram Rock’, a song memorably described as being about “two hedge fund managers doing coke at a funeral”. The motorik grooves and punishing walls of sound of ‘Heel/Heal’, meanwhile, are dedicated to local band Fontaines D.C., with Talbot effusive in his praise of whom he calls ‘the best fucking band in the world’. Evidently, some people were listening, as their own show here next month has since sold out. [It has been announced this week that Fontaines D.C. will be joining IDLES on their North American headline tour next May. – Ed.]

The show rolls along at a clip, with fans as open to the band’s message as they are the musical content. ‘Samaritans’ is introduced as “a song that wants to encourage men to talk about their feelings” before Talbot extends gratitude toward the heaving crowd: “Thank you for allowing us to share our message with you.” The song itself is delivered at a pace significantly slower than the album version, but still goes down a storm.

‘Television’ receives one of the best responses of the night, picking things back up as we head into the closing moments of the set. Things get slightly out of hand on ‘Exeter’, with Talbot all but derailed midway through the song by the sheer amount of bodies on stage. He runs with it, though, and the stage invasion generates enough energy to get through the rest of the set. One stage invader gifts Talbot a scarf (“for those cold Irish nights”, he says, though it’s probably serving him well in Europe) and is then surfed back on to the stage no less than three separate times during their cover of Solomon Burke’s ‘Cry to Me’.

The room is treated to a brief a capella cover of Mariah Carey’s ‘All I Want For Christmas is You’ before the set is brought to a close with a frantic rendition of ‘Well Done’ and their traditional set closer ‘Rottweiler’ (“It’s about the horrific right-wing press in the UK … Don’t read the Sun, it’ll give you cancer”). Before they bring the curtain down on their debut Irish headline show in authoritative fashion, Talbot reveals that they’re planning a return visit to these shores sometime in the new year.

No encores, of course – ‘we don’t do them because it’s weird’ – but considering how much of themselves they leave on the stage, they can close shows however they see fit. This might have been somewhat overdue, but it turns out to be well worth the wait. The scramble for tickets for that forthcoming show is going to be brutal.

 

Video of the Moment #2908: IDER

 
By on Wednesday, 7th November 2018 at 6:00 pm
 

There was a whole lot of buzz around good friends and rhythmic pop duo IDER at SXSW 2018. They had recently signed to Glassnote Records and loads of folks were interested in seeing them perform Saturday night at the BBC Radio 1 and the UK’s Department of International Trade-sponsored showcase at the British Music Embassy. IDER’s debut album is slated for release in 2019, and they’ve released another preview of the upcoming LP. ‘Mirror’ in its promo video form is presented in a split screen, with Megan Markwick and Lily Somerville spending time apart in the two halves of the screen before being reunited at its conclusion. Watch the video for ‘Mirror’ below. For more on this intriguing duo here on TGTF, use this link.

 

Live Review: The Twilight Sad at U Street Music Hall, Washington, DC – 3rd November 2018

 
By on Wednesday, 7th November 2018 at 2:00 pm
 

The closer we march to Christmas, the quicker the nights fall. On one of these chilly nights, The Twilight Sad descended on the Nation’s Capital to close out their 3-week North American tour with a bang. Despite the chill in the air outside, the basement venue U Street Music Hall played host to a sweaty mass of people eager to catch the Scottish post-punks before they returned home.

At first, I thought it was a strange thing to tour over here so far in advance of the release of their next album, which isn’t expected until early 2019. However, as the set progressed, standing among so many fans and their fervour, the thought evaporated. They were out here because of fan demand; their fanbase has undoubtedly increased since Robert Smith’s personal endorsement of the band and the Cure taking the band on tour with them. Frontman James Graham cracked a joke about us having nothing better to do on a Saturday night than see them but that they were awfully glad we turned up. Laughter ensued.

Since 2007 debut LP ‘Fourteen Autumns & Fifteen Winters’, The Twilight Sad’s sound has morphed and evolved a few times, and the stage setup reflected this. A Macbook and two keyboards would have been unheard of at Twilight Sad shows a decade ago. With a massive back catalogue of tracks across four albums and a host of singles and EPs, there was plenty of material to choose from for their final set on this tour. The evening began with ‘There’s a Girl in the Corner’, its sombre tones opening ‘Nobody Wants to Be Here and Nobody Wants to Leave’, which was met with pretty much universal acclaim when unveiled in 2014.

The Twilight Sad 2018 3

Throughout the set, the band’s trademark distorted guitars and Graham’s cutting, emotional lyrics delivered in his unmistakable Scottish brogue. At times, he looked like a man possessed, spinning like a whirling dervish or even punching himself in the head or chest, all the while the band banged out the hard-hitting tunes. For the long-time fans, older gems like ‘The Wrong Car’ and ‘And She Would Darken the Memory’ that closed the set with a deafening crescendo recalled the days when The Twilight Sad were a best-kept secret. In contrast, newer songs including single ‘I/m Not Here [missing face]’ and ‘Videograms’, whose glittery synths have been likened to that of The Cure’s, suggest the ushering in of a new era for the Scots, during which their music proves more accessible, is imminent. In the crowd, heads bopped, limbs flailed and words were sung along to.

Scottish indie music fans in the room Saturday night were waiting, quite possibly bracing themselves, too, for a particularly heart-wrenching moment that the band have repeated in their live shows over the last 6 months. Since his sad, untimely death by suicide in May, Scott Hutchison’s passing has been an apparition in our lives, a regular reminder of the fragility of humanity and the need for all of us to talk more, listen more and support our mates through difficult times. By playing ‘Keep Yourself Warm’ every night, The Twilight Sad pay tribute to their close friend Hutchison, a song true to form for so many of the songs he wrote, expressing the kinds of things adult men have been told not to say aloud or to others. Graham explained that they needed to move up the song’s placement in the set “for themselves”, presumedly so they could get past it the emotions and get back to the business of playing for us. In the audience, glasses were raised and tears were wiped away.

When it came time to say goodnight, Graham thanked the crowd again for coming to the show and that for sure, they’d be back in Washington in due time. And really, why would they stay away with a turnout like this? Stay tuned for The Twilight Sad’s fifth studio album ‘It Won/t Be Like This All the Time’, which is expected to drop on the 18th of January 2019 on Rock Action Records.

The Twilight Sad 2018 5

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

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