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(SXSW 2017 flavoured!) Album Review: The Big Moon – Love in the 4th Dimension

 
By on Friday, 7th April 2017 at 12:00 pm
 

The Big Moon Love in the 4th Dimension album coverThere’s been plenty of buzz around The Big Moon, which comprises Juliette Jackson, Soph Nathann, Celia Archer and Fern Ford, ahead of their debut LP, recorded in London. They’ve toured with fellow alt-rockers VANT and Inheaven, as well as supporting The Maccabees and The Vaccines on tour, and have been releasing solid, engaging tracks since they first came together in 2014. It’s been a long wait for ‘Love in the 4th Dimension’, but a worthwhile one. The new record features plenty of the tracks that The Big Moon have released over the past couple of years, including ‘Cupid’, ‘Sucker’ and the more recent ‘Formidable’. It’s the kind of album that’s easy to enjoy for its edgy alt-rock moments, as well as the accessible subject matter of love and relationships in the lyrics.

As you might have come to expect, If you’ve previously heard any of the band’s stuff, you won’t be disappointed by this display of heartfelt pop/rock, produced by a well-oiled machine. There are energetic and brash moments, like on the retro ‘Silent Movie Susie’, and chilled out and easy-going spells such as on the hazy ‘Zeds’, featuring vocal harmonies and a groaning guitar riff. Title track ‘Love In the 4th Dimension’ has the laid-back, confident attitude reminiscent of that of The Last Shadow Puppets’ tracks.

The album begins with ‘Sucker’, which opens with fuzzy guitar before we hear lead singer Juliette Jackson crooning in her distinctive cool and throaty vocals. ‘Sucker’ was first released way, way back in 2015, a time when the UK separating from the EU and the prospect of a wildly coiffed President of the United States were nothing but strange and disconcerting dreams. Like other tracks on the album, ‘Sucker’ tackles the emotions around relationships: “It got darker / Every night / But I wouldn’t change my mind / I’m a sucker for you”, as the title of the album might suggest.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6t3vNfl85E[/youtube]

Another single released from the album, ‘Cupid’, is the oh-so-listenable track that details the oh-so-relatable experience of building something up so much, it’s inevitably not quite going to live up to expectations. It’s as playful as it is bittersweet, with lyrics like, “I’m gonna get this perfectly right / He said, “I’m gonna shoot the perfect bulls-eye” / Draw the arrow back / Steel yourself”. Similar is ‘Happy New Year’, which hits on those feelings of being wistfully aware of growing older and changing, while trying to enjoy the moment. In the chorus, Jackson sings over and over, “I’m never gonna be this young”, hitting on those weird thoughts that we have at the approach of midnight on the 31st of December.

Standout ‘Formidable’ is a bit of a self-affirming powerhouse. The verses are pretty chilled out and steady, before quickly building towards the passionate chorus. Jackson sings, “I am not invisible / I’m on your side / I’ll be formidable”, before almost yelling out, “you let me heal your battle scars”. Supporting someone in time of need and the willingness to be there for them isn’t just a formidable act, it’s an admirable one.

There’s not a song on the album that isn’t likable, and I think it goes to show what a talented group of people can achieve when they have the chance to give time to working on an album rather than rushing to get one put together. All in all, Love in the 4th Dimension is a seriously fun listen. The tracks tie together real emotions and feelings, matched with addictive hooks, simple yet effective lyrics and an obvious love from the band towards the music they play.

9/10

‘Love in the 4th Dimension’, the debut album from The Big Moon, is out today on Startime International / Columbia Records. To read more of TGTF’s past coverage on The Big Moon, go here. Stay tuned for Carrie’s review of the band at SXSW 2017 last month, coming soon to TGTF.

 

RTÉ Choice Music Prize Awards Roundup

 
By on Tuesday, 28th March 2017 at 12:00 pm
 

Earlier this month, I headed out to The RTÉ Choice Prize Awards at the jam-packed Vicar Street in Dublin 8, south of the Liffey. Arriving early, we grabbed ourselves a pint of Guinness’ Hop House 13 and took our seats in anticipation of an exciting, music-filled evening. During the course of the night, we were treated to a range of live performances, as well as the announcement of the winner of both the RTÉ Choice Music Prize single and album of 2016.

The first act of the night was Wallis Bird, whose yellow-white hair glowed onstage like a beacon of light. Bird captivated the audience with her heartfelt a capella as she stood alone onstage during ‘Home’, the title track of the album for which she was nominated. On another track, she banged against a microphone and used a loop pedal to create a rhythmic and organic backdrop for her incredible lungs. It was a raw and vulnerable performance. In a post-performance interview, Bird recounted the significance of ‘Home’ and living in the house where she first met her girlfriend.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nmd3wDnRJpM[/youtube]

Next up was Bantum (Ruairi Lynch), nominated for his album ‘Move’, who I’d had the pleasure of seeing before at the Shortlist Sessions, but the last time I saw him he was alone onstage with his laptop and guitar. This time, he was joined onstage by the singers who feature on his tracks. The first track ‘Feel It Out’ featured Farah, and the second featured Loah and two backing singers on the song ‘Take It’. It made a huge difference with the singers being live, really fleshing out the music, and he looked like he was a lot more comfortable. After the performance, he discussed his love for funk sounds, and how the album was released completely independently.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ky1xy600BKc[/youtube]

We Cut Corners, who I’d also seen at the Shortlist event, took to the stage next and played a hugely varied set in terms of tempo and sound. Nominated for their album ‘The Cadence of Others’ the duo confidently took to the stage to perform their tracks ‘Middle Kids’ and ‘Of Whatever’. Considering their smart and wonderfully wordy lyrics, you’d never guess the pair are teachers. At one point, the two stood side by side at the microphone, singing a capella with a smoky, moody spotlight allowing their voices to carry over the crowd. Then, at other times, Conall Ó Breacháin was banging one handed against a drum kit with one hand whilst John Duignan was strumming away at his guitar.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gl1sJLwtmUo[/youtube]

Next to the stage was indie legends and former winner of the Choice Prize, The Divine Comedy. Neil Hannon,sat at a piano to perform some tracks from his latest effort ‘Foreverland’, Divine Comedy’s 11th studio album, reviewed by editor Mary back here. He and his live band kicked off their three-song set with ‘Catherine the Great’, before playing the witty and evocative ‘How Can You Leave Me On My Own?’ and drawing a number of laughs from the audience.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ehxil2jZiok[/youtube]

Following The Divine Comedy’s performance, the winner of the Song of the Year was announced. Unable to be there on the night, winners Picture This (winning for ‘Take My Hand’) had recorded a video accepting the award and thanking all who had voted from a studio in the States where they are recording their new album. You can listen to Carrie’s interview with Picture This in Austin after that recording experience here.

Lisa Hannigan then took to the stage. It’s hard to explain to someone who hasn’t heard Hannigan sing live just how powerful, yet calming her voice is. Ethereal and waif-like, Hannigan seems to command the stage without really trying to draw attention. I’m trying not to sound like a super fan. Armed with a banjo on one track, and what I believe was a tabletop accordion on another, Hannigan’s album ‘At Swim’ (reviewed by Carrie here) was nominated for the Album of the Year, and she played a few tracks from the album, including the spooky and slow-marching ‘We, The Drowned’ and the folky ‘Undertow’.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSnaQAv77JE[/youtube]

The sixth act of the evening was the all-in-black Katie Kim, nominated for her third studio album ‘Salt’, whose morose, moody sound I fell in love with right away. Standing at first with her guitar, then moving onto a keyboard, Kim’s unusual and rich sound filled the room, and in particular her tracks ‘Ghosts’ and ‘Day is Coming which are the first two tracks on the album. ‘Salt’ is an emotive and powerful piece of work, and seems even more incredible when considering Kim is a solo artist.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cspN1Zk3L7Q[/youtube]

A little different to Kim’s haunting melodies, eventual Album of the Year winners Rusangano Family (for ‘Let the Dead Bury the Dead’) virtually erupted into life and had the audience on their feet during their fast-paced set. The title track of their LP opens with the tolling of a funeral bell, before MCs God Knows and MuRli began to do what they excel at, capturing the crowd’s attention with their fast-paced and lyrical verses.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ap_P-poNuY[/youtube]

Rapping about Irish identity and asylum seekers, they engaged the crowd by dancing and jumping enthusiastically throughout the set, even joining the audience out on the floor, while DJ mynameisjOhn was at the decks. After just a few minutes of their performance, former TGTF contributor Tom turned to me and said, “I want these guys to win”.

RTE Choice Music Prize 2016 winners Rusangano Family

Then we had All Tvvins, the enigmatic indie pop duo Conor Adams and Lar Kaye, nominated for their album ‘IIVV’, which Adam reviewed back here. They started with the catchy ‘Thank You’, a track with a seriously addictive guitar hook. Up next they played ‘These 4 Words’, followed by ‘Darkest Ocean’, receiving huge cheers from the audience. Bouncing around the stage, the pair looked like they were having a great time.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6agMJjr2TK0[/youtube]

The final act of the night was Overhead the Albatross, nominated for their album ‘Learning to Growl’. An instrumental-only act, live they have what seemed like 6 million guitars, a drum set and a violin. They finished up with a well-earned standing ovation and certainly deserve some real props for making instrumental-only music so interesting and feel so accessible. I’m going to be honest, I couldn’t tell you what tracks from their nominated album were played, but they were certainly impressive with a mixture of funky rhythms, moments of slower paced violin solos, and with an evident passion for the music that they were playing.

All in all, we had a pretty spectacular night. It was great to catch a glimpse of what the all too underrated Irish music scene has too offer. Perhaps underrated isn’t the best term, as the people that I’ve spoken to in my newly adopted home can’t help but rave about the music that is out there by Irish artists. This is music too often under the radar in terms of the global picture aside from the occasional artist that will break through: Hozier jumps to mind here.

I can definitely say that I’m excited to see what’s in store for the future of Irish music, particularly now that I’m able to access more of it living on Irish soil. If the eclectic and talented mixture of music that I heard at Vicar Street is any indication of the variety of music there, then I’ve got high hopes for the music that I’m going to be discovering over the coming months (maybe even years) now that I’m rooted here in Dublin.

 

(SXSW 2017 flavoured!) Single Review: The Vryll Society – Sacred Flight

 
By on Thursday, 9th February 2017 at 12:00 pm
 

The Vryll Society might just be one of Liverpool’s best-kept psychedelic secrets, although judging by the attention they’ve garnered from the likes of BBC Radio 1’s Huw Stephens and 6 Music’s Steve Lamacq, this could be about to change. The band has released a bunch of singles over the past couple of years, including the hypnotic ‘A Perfect Rhythm’ out late last year. With their debut album expected this year, things are likely to change quickly for them in 2017.

‘Sacred Flight’ is the latest single from the band; released in late January, it’s the lead single from their upcoming debut. The tune is a track full of movement that is driven along with lead singer Mike Ellis’ entrancing, laid-back vocals. Ellis reminds me of fellow psychedelic rock lead singer Harry Koisser of Peace. Having just made that comparison however, the track has got something about it that makes it feel exciting and unique. It feels experimental without being too out and feeling inaccessible to someone that isn’t a diehard fan of the psych rock genre. It’s always great to hear music from a band that is trying to do something outside of the mainstream, instead of following in the footsteps of other bands who have made it big.

The song opens with a gently warbling guitar and fluid electronic sounds, before picking up with the introduction of Ellis’ voice and an inundation of synth babbling. Lyrics “please come back / soon come back / I felt the spirit go”, speaks to the transcendental and metaphysical nature of what I imagine the sacred flight to mean: some sort of out of body experience or spiritual journey (“leave this place on a sacred flight”). Ellis describes the track as a “motoric journey into cosmic space jolting atoms of sound from one galaxy to another before finally exploding into a jewel box of guitar frenzied litany”, which probably sums it up better than I ever could!

8/10

‘Sacred Flight’ is the latest single from Liverpool psych rock band The Vryll Society, out now on Deltasonic Records. Having previously supporting Blossoms, and appearing a number of festivals in 2016, their live shows are touted to be quite something. The Vryll Society will appear at SXSW 2017 in Austin this March, before returning to the UK for a few dates. Check out their full schedule here.

 

Live Review: RTÉ Choice Music Prize – The Shortlist Sessions

 
By on Monday, 6th February 2017 at 2:00 pm
 

Last Wednesday evening saw performances from nominees of the RTÉ Choice Music Prize in the candle-lit venue the Workman’s Club in Dublin city centre. Hosted by Irish musician and radio presenter/producer Cormac Battle, the evening started with two nominees for the RTÉ Choice Music Prize for Irish Song of the Year, followed by two of the acts shortlisted for Irish Album of the Year.

Ten acts have been shortlisted for the Irish Song of the Year, including James Vincent McMorrow and ex-One Direction-er Niall Horan. On Wednesday we saw performances from Heroes in Hiding and Raglans, both based in Dublin and the only two acts nominated for this award who have self-released their singles. Up first were folk-rock quartet Heroes in Hiding, who revealed during a brief pre-performance interview with Battle that they had never won or been nominated for an award.

However, within 30 seconds or so of the band playing their nominated track ‘Hospital’, it became pretty clear why they are now getting this kind of recognition conferred by the Choice Music Prize. ‘Hospital’ is a catchy track, featuring seemingly medical-inspired percussive sounds and upbeat guitars and drums. It’s little less folky than some of the band’s other stuff but is definitely a track you can dance or bob your head along to. The chorus, featuring vocalist Joe Carroll crowing “next thing I knew / I was in the hospital”, recalls a real near death experience of Carroll’s in which he remembers very little of the incident, but after which he woke up in a hospital bed.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZlyiiVJffg[/youtube]

The band followed this up with ‘Beer’, for which Carroll donned an acoustic guitar. Bassist Liam McCabe took the lead vocals on this track, which started out much more mellow and laid back than ‘Hospital’ before building to an early Mumford and Sons-esque climax (sans banjo) that literally made the room shake.

Next up was Raglans, who thanked their manager and revealed that it was their second time playing The Workman’s Club. Lead singer Stephen Kelly’s stage presence was everything you could want from a ballsy lead singer. He has a swagger and laid back confidence, joking “if you feel like voting for us: thank you. If you don’t… f**k you”. They started with ‘House Where I Was Born’, which isn’t the track that is up for nomination but is a solid track nonetheless; it features on their ‘Again & Again EP’. With edgy guitars and intense drums aplenty, this is as authentic rock ‘n’ roll as you’ve ever heard. Kelly’s Irish accent doesn’t come across when he singing and at times, the band actually reminded me of early Arctic Monkeys, in the rough and ready, yet great sound of their music. Nominated track ‘Who Knows’ came next: high in energy, it engaged the crowd most out of all the acts we saw that evening. Commanding the stage with growing indie guitar hooks and a hammering drumbeat, the band looked to be in their element and enjoying their moment in the spotlight being nominated for the Choice Music Prize.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9P2As4JCu4[/youtube]

Following a break, it was time for a pair of the Irish Album of the Year nominees to take to the stage. Bantum is an electronic act originally from Cork who appeared onstage armed only with a guitar and a laptop. He jokingly commented that he would get himself a new guitar if he won the prize money. Pretty different in style to previous two acts, Bantum is synth heavy, and track ‘Take It’ features ghostly vocals from Loah, whose voice is reminiscent of the xx’s Romy Madley-Croft. [Loah appeared at Hard Working Class Heroes 2016 last October and is scheduled to appear at SXSW 2017. – Ed.] It’s the kind of chilled out dance track that would be fitting at a festival as the sun is beginning to set and people are in between the highs of the morning and getting their second wind just in time for the evening acts. didn’t catch the name of the second track, but it carried an equally atmospheric and laid-back essence. Whilst I really enjoyed Bantum, The Workman’s Club didn’t seem like the best setting for the performance, and his sound didn’t quite seem to engage the crowd as well as other acts. Maybe this was because the event was on a mid-week evening? However, Bantum definitely has an easy-going ambient sound that would work better in a club at the weekend, or a summer festival.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ky1xy600BKc[/youtube]

The final act of the evening was indie duo We Cut Corners. Both members are teachers and they stood together onstage with their acoustic guitars. Both John Duignan and Conall Ó Breacháin have high, clear and bright singing voices, one complimenting the other. They started with ‘Reluctant Recluse’, a smoky, soft acoustic track, featuring some nimble wordplay (“I was a reckless child / now I’m a childless wreck”), and a wholly passionate performance. This track appears on ‘The Cadences of Others’, the album for which the band is nominated. Even while simply performed with just a pair of melancholic acoustic guitars, the delivery of ‘Reluctant Recluse’ on this night conveyed a whole melting pot of emotions, making the track a standout.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4wGroj4sck[/youtube]

The second and final song from We Cut Corners was ‘Of Whatever’. Despite the quiet nature of the track, the pair were able to keep the rapt attention of the crowd, the crystalline vocals and emotive lyrics mesmerising. Lyrics like “but young love is reckless / leaves you gasping and breathless” and “a wave of whatever / is sweeping the nation” cemented this for me as being a genuinely beautiful track, making me think of the act as an Irish male First Aid Kit.

All in all, it was a fantastic night and I was glad to have seen all four acts perform, each bringing something different to the table. Votes can now be cast by the public for both the RTÉ Choice Music Prize Irish Song of the Year and of the Irish Album of the Year. The winners will be announced at a live event on Thursday, the 9th of March, at Dublin Vicar Street.

 

(SXSW 2017 flavoured!) Album Review: Menace Beach – Lemon Memory

 
By on Thursday, 26th January 2017 at 12:00 pm
 

Menace Beach Lemon Memory album cover‘Lemon Memory’ is the second album from Leeds-grown indie surf rockers Menace Beach and is the follow up to their 2015 debut ‘Ratworld’. Although the album was recorded in Sheffield, the songs were actually written in Ibiza, which you wouldn’t be able to guess considering the edgy rock flavour to the album. The band is fronted by Ryan Needham, formerly of Komakino, and Liza Violet, also of Department M. Truly a product of Yorkshire, the current line-up also includes Nestor Matthews (Sky Larkin), Matt Spalding (You Animals) and Nick Chantler (Seize the Chair). It’s an album that feels like a bit of an experiment. The tempo and guitars are dialled up more on some tracks than others. There’s also an occasional use of subtle industrial-esque synth distortion on some tracks, while others have a heavier, punchier attitude.

Standout ‘Maybe We’ll Drown’ is the second song on the album and sees Violet take the vocals front and centre. It’s easy to see why this was released as a single, and the thrumming guitar and Violet’s voice is reminiscent of Emily Haines of Metric. Featuring ghostly synth sounds contrasting with Violet’s soft vocals that are joined by Needham’s distorted voice in the chorus, the track has a spooky quality that draws you in. Like ‘Maybe We’ll Drown’, ‘Watch Me Boil’ features both Needham and Violet singing together. There’s something very special when the two voices join in song as the pair croon “kick me on the fire / you’ll only make me higher” repeatedly over a sluggish guitar and drum rhythm.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8wHP56Dyzo[/youtube]

There’s also something pretty catchy about ‘Suck It Out’, with Needham singing the title of the track over and over in the chorus. It’s a hazy track, with indistinct guitars and a steady drumbeat marching away in the background. Sounding like he’s far away on the track, Needham’s voice almost blurs together with the whirring guitars at times, whereas at others, the hissing guitar hook plays like an emergency siren.

The album plays out to the gentle and haunting ‘Hexbreaker II’, with Violet softly crooning on the track over a steady drum and guitar giving just a touch of feedback. It’s an eerie track that ties up the loose ends of the album, and provides a nod to the supposed curse that has been placed on the house of Violet and Needham. Spooky and pared back, the song feels like a gentle and subdued conclusion to an album that is at times a fuzzy, distorted experiment, and at others a homage to classic indie rock ‘n’ roll.

Having said that, I do feel like there’s something left to be desired on the album – not all of the tracks feel cohesive and some definitely stand out more than others. I would have liked to hear more of Violet and Needham singing together, as the tracks on which the two voices appear together feel the most rounded and memorable. But all in all it’s definitely not dull, and is worth a listen if indie surf rock is your bag.

6/10

Menace Beach’s second album ‘Lemon Memory’ is out now on Memphis Industries. They will begin a tour of the UK on the 31st of this month, which continues through February. The band are also scheduled to appear at SXSW 2017 in Austin in March. For more of TGTF’s coverage on the band, follow this link.

 

Album Review: The Blue Aeroplanes – Welcome, Stranger!

 
By on Thursday, 12th January 2017 at 12:00 pm
 

Blue Aeroplanes Welcome Stranger album coverI confess that until recently, I’d never heard of The Blue Aeroplanes. However, after reading up on the Bristolian band’s history and influence, as well as the work of its various members, it’s pretty clear they’re connected in some way to a wide range of artists that I’ve been listening to for a long time. From ex-members working with the likes of Placebo and Massive Attack, to reportedly being the best band that Manic Street Preachers’ James Dean Bradfield has seen live, it feels like The Blue Aeroplanes have, whilst remaining relatively underground, permeated the layers of music history.

The Blue Aeroplanes haven’t released an album in 6 years, since ‘Anti-Gravity’ in 2011. Bearing in mind their first studio album came out in 1984, it’s quite an impressive feat in itself that they’re putting out new material after all this time. That’s even before you consider the band’s incredible history. The Blue Aeroplanes have released almost 12 studio albums across 4 decades and have had a dizzying history of band members over the years. The band’s current lineup also consists of long-serving drummer John Langley, Gerard Starkie, Sharp (bass), Bec Jevons (guitar/vocals) and Mike Youe (guitar).

Their latest, ‘Welcome, Stranger!’, was just released last Friday through Art Star and a PledgeMusic campaign. The album has an old school feel to it, particularly in the edgy drawl of guitars and lead singer Gerard Langley’s distinctive smoky vocals evocative of ‘90s shoegaze. This is a rather wonderful and eclectic mix of subdued indie upbeat rock with Sprechgesang. I can’t tell if I think it’s brilliant or just a bit mad, although I guess there’s not reason why it can’t be both.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v6COjr6D_AU[/youtube]

Tracks such as ‘Here is the Heart of All Wild Things’, Poetland’, ‘Retro Moon’ and ‘Nothing Will Ever Happen in the Future’ feature Gerard Langley speak-singing over the track, pulling it off with a biting poetic flair. In the latter, he speaks over a gently twanging guitar during the verses, before singing “we want to be wanted / we need to be needed / we love to be loved” during the chorus. I’d argue this is more a pithy comment on celebrity culture than a personal confession. On ‘Dead Tree! Dead Tree!’, which opens up to a steadily beating drum before a shoegaze-esque guitar breaks in, Langley and co. repeatedly sing out the title of the track. It even features Langley imitating a crow in a strained squawk. This one is a must listen.

A bit like ‘Dead Tree! Dead Tree!’, ‘Elvis Festival’ is brilliantly strange: “You sing badly / but no one cares / you are Elvis”. Other lyrics from it made me laugh out loud at first (“his wife sewed on the sequins / but he made the cape himself”), but then I couldn’t stop playing it for the simple guitar riff and drum beat and brilliantly utilised cowbell that had me dancing along, wishing I was at a festival. ‘Skin’ is a little more upbeat, a diversion from other tracks on the album. Not only does it feature vocals from Bec Jevons (also of IDestroy), but it’s also a straight-to-the-point, fast-paced track. It’s an interesting contrast to the other obscure tracks on the album. Jevons sings, “this is my skin and I welcome you in”, with skin being the central focus of connecting to someone else, not only in tactile terms, but the idea of letting someone into your skin and seeing the world the way that you might see it.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7A-AnduoiMQ[/youtube]

Overall, it’s an interesting and exciting listen and deserves to be properly heard to appreciate the songs’ witty wordplay. Its timeless quality makes the LP sound like it could have been produced any time over the past couple of decades. Despite the fact that I found it an enjoyable listen, it’s unlikely to remove the band from their underground cult status and into the mainstream. Having said that, from what I’ve read of the band so far, it doesn’t seem like that’s likely to be their goal. ‘Welcome, Stranger!’ feels more like the work of a band that is making music for the joy of it rather than for fame or notoriety. And it’s sure to be an album that will please the existing fans that have been waiting patiently for new material.

7.5/10

The Blue Aeroplanes’ latest album ‘Welcome, Stranger!’, out now on Art Star, definitely deserves a listen, if you’re not already a fan. The band are in the midst of a UK tour this month; check out the UK dates listed on their official Web site. The bits we have here on TGTF on the band are back here in our archive.

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

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