Album Review: Seafret – Monsters EP

By on Wednesday, 5th September 2018 at 12:00 pm
 

A 2-year hiatus for the Bridlington duo Seafret will come to an end with the release of a new four-track EP this Friday. ‘Monsters’ shows a rawer side to Jack Sedman and Harry Draper that was hinted at on their 2016 debut album ‘Tell Me It’s Real’ but was not fully disclosed then.

The EP opens with the title track, which instantly sets a moody and mysterious vibe, created through the use of minor chromatic guitar descents, leaving you unsure of what is to come. This moodiness becomes even more dramatic with the addition of low stabs on the piano that reverberate under the vocals and guitar. It’s a successful theatrical opening to the record, creating suspense in subtle and clever ways and avoiding becoming gimmicky.

The pace picks up with second track ‘Can’t Look Away’ which starts acoustically and gently, but then goes on to explode into an electric chorus, heavy with accented drumbeats and sustained guitar twangs. The song is powerful and a great contrast to the previous track, but something feels missing. By the end of the tune, the verses and choruses are over-repeated and even with the stripped-back bridge that offers some respite, there is not enough variation or climatic tension to really elevate the song. It’s a slight let down when compared to an EP that has so much emotion and raw edge to it. One has to ask, have Seafret dug deep enough in themselves for this track?

Fortunately, ‘Bad Blood’, the third track of Seafret’s EP, makes up for what ‘Can’t Look Away’ lacks in depth. It’s here that we really hear Sedman’s talent for expressive vocals. Again, the duo has favoured subtlety to express emotion, with Sedman not overdoing it on the performance but rather letting the small breaks in his voice and slight dynamic fluctuations do the talking. It’s these small elements that shine on the track and make what is an electric, rock track more intimate and raw.

These subtle elements are also successful in connecting ‘Bad Blood’ to final track ‘Heartless’. Although the two tracks are polar opposites in instrumentation, the clear emotion in ‘Bad Blood’ allows for a smooth flow to the fourth track, undoubtedly the most profound on the EP. ‘Heartless’ itself is acoustic heaven: simple yet seductive in its intimacy. It’s a perfect way to end the EP, showing Seafret at their most vulnerable and leaving the listener wanting more of this raw edge that we heard so brilliantly in three out of four tracks of this EP.

8.5/10

‘Monsters’ will be released this Friday, the 7th of September, on Kobalt. You can catch Seafret on their next English tour later this month, listed here on their official Web site. Our archive of articles on Seafret here on TGTF can be accessed this way.

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