SXSW 2018 Interview: Rachel K Collier (Part 2)

By on Wednesday, 11th April 2018 at 11:00 am
 

Part 1 of this interview feature with the fabulous Rachel K Collier is through here.

We chat a bit about her performance at Latitude 30, which I was lucky enough to witness. Collier emphasises that her live show is very much a work in progress. “Without four cameras on me [to film and for the audience to see what she’s doing], I need to be interacting with the crowd. So I’ve had to simplify some of my live set. Otherwise, I’m just standing there, pressing buttons. Where’s my connection with the crowd? If I’m constantly triggering, I have be behind Push all the time. I’m still working on it, I’m constantly refining my live show. I realised quite quickly that I’m a performer. I want to be out there with the crowd. I’ll do whatever I can to combine both things. I never want to hit Play on a track. That’s just boring. Someone once asked me, ‘why don’t you just press Play?’ I want to have the freedom to trigger the clips whenever I want to bring them in. I want to loop whatever I want to loop. I want to be able to do things on the fly. I get a bit of a buzz from it!”

The Welsh artist is also eager to lift the veil over what is all too often a black box for electronic music fans. “In the future, we’d like to get cameras on the Push, so people can really see what I’m doing. No one can see the lights on the Push and what I can see.” I point out that as a female producer, songwriter and performer, she’s an all too rare breed these days. The very existence of Rachel K Collier and the success she has garnered so far can only be a positive thing for the future of electronic music, I explain. Having someone like her out front, showing a woman can make it in the electronic genre and have fun doing it is a huge thing.

“I trigger a new scene at the end of a song to trigger the tempo of the new song. If you trigger a clip, you stay in the previous song’s tempo. When I go from ‘And I Breathe’ mid-set, I have a big pitch drop before I drop the tempo from 123 to 94 for ‘Poison’. If I talk over the clip, I lose where the 1 [count] is, but then I need to bring in the next clip in, and it could come in anywhere. Maybe I should have a marker somewhere so I know where I am, but really, that’s part of the fun. A year ago, I would have been like, oh gosh, everything has to be perfect. Now I’m like okay, you know what, I’m triggering the clips, sometimes it’s going to go wrong, and I can actually now laugh about it. It’s live! Sometimes it’s good when stuff goes wrong. Actually, something did go wrong Tuesday, in the intro for ‘And I Breathe’. The controllers were moving, and I hit the BPM knob by accident. Luckily, where I was in the project, new scene, boom!”

She starts to laugh. “I’ve gone all nerdy on this. Is that okay?” I assure her it’s perfectly fine. To be honest, her being so detailed and ‘getting in the weeds’, so to speak, on her live show is further proof just how complicated her process is and how she’s taking it in her stride. Collier is also very adamant about making sure her music has meaning. Referencing her Quickfire Questions answer about a song that makes her laugh, she conveys her appreciation for Everything Everything’s ‘No Reptiles’ and the way Jonathan Higgs writes his lyrics. “With a lot of their music, I’m like, did he really say that? I like stuff with loads of imagery, because I do that in my lyrics as well. I’m really happy with reviews of my music when people say, ‘yeah, it’s dance music, but it has meaning. It has words, it has real lyrics. That’s what I didn’t really like about writing generic top lines, in any old time signature. It didn’t mean anything. Yeah, it’s going to make people dance, but it doesn’t really mean anything. I want to be able to dance, but I also want to be able to sing something that means something. As an artist, I had to get my head round that I need to be saying something.”

She is quick to point out the potential contradiction she has in her own preference for music. “I love straight dance. I’m a raver. You could probably tell from my set!” Everyone says, ‘you have so much energy’. I’m really a passionate musician. And I made that music! This is so nerdy, but that actual groove of ‘Poison’ is a fast groove at 124, and I shoved it into MetaSynth. It’s this really nerdy granular synthesis program, it’s my secret weapon now. If I want something that’s a bit edgy, I chuck it in there, it’s like a playground. You can go in there and mess stuff up. I slowed this 124 down, I pitch shifted it down. I liked it and brought that sound back into Ableton, put my own kick and snare [drums] into it. I’m really fussy, there’s three kicks in there, I made one of the kicks in my Korg MiniLogue, sampled it, cut it up perfect. I like taking bits of the other tracks and resample it. See, this comes back to Ableton. You can’t do that in Logic or ProTools. That’s what I mean when I say it [Ableton] helps me express myself.”

There have been a few bumps this week in Austin, but nothing serious that could dampen her mood. “South By has been a bit of a learning curve. Some of the sound engineers are not as familiar with this kind of electro vibe. Some of them are like, ‘what is all this?’” It’s a nice segue to my next question, asking Collier how she’s been treated in the electronic world as a woman. So far, Grimes has been the most vocal female artist in the electronic genre to complain about the sexist treatment she’s faced. “It definitely happens when [you’re a woman and] you’re a producer. When you’re performing, they probably think someone else produced it, or whatever. My first EP, I remember playing it to someone. ‘Oh, who produced it?’ Uh, me? He just went on, thinking that I was the featured artist on the record. I was like, what the hell?”

Rachel K Collier Words You Never Heard EP cover

“I’ve had a few things [like that] happen. With my first self-release, I did it on Love & Other, a really small label. [That EP, ‘Words You Never Heard’, got a review of 8/10 on Mixmag. Not bad at all straight out of the gate – Ed.] That was really cool, a nice starter. I look back at that stuff and go, gosh, that’s really basic. Then my first-ever self release on AWAL, I got a comment, ‘great track! Whoever produced this for Rachel should do a whole album with her.’ I said to Ben, email them now, tell them I bloody produced it! Get that message through. Some people just don’t connect girl and a bass line. Girl and drums. Girl and computer. There’s a girl called Nightwave, she’s a female DJ, she did a Boiler Room and people totally slated her [read more about that incident here]. She’s now set up this whole thing [with other UK female electronic producers] called Producergirls. She does her lecture with quotes like ‘Who did she do to get there?’ and ‘Oh, she must have a ghost producer’, all this crap boys say.

“It [being a woman] works in my favour, in a way. Red Bull has their #NormalNotNovelty [music workshop], I’ve done some stuff with those guys as well. So I’m proud I’m a girl and doing it. Screw you guys. It’s funny, I’ve helped many guys with their Ableton sets. I’ll tell them we’ll FaceTime later. I love teaching it as well. Every single person I help is a guy. It’s really cool, because they’re like, ‘Rachel really knows her stuff about Ableton, let me call her.’ I might actually apply to be a certified trainer now. I might as well just do it. I’m already helping people.”

Reaching out in such a way seems entirely natural for Collier, although her initial foray into YouTube “started off slow. But people are really into it now. My single’s out today. I filmed a little talk-through inside the screen and put that on YouTube last night. ‘Here’s the project using Ableton Live 10. It looks beautiful. Here’s the bass, here’s drums, here’s the keys. Here’s the riff I did.’ I want to be transparent as well. I want to be honest. I couldn’t be anything else. Some other people are like, I don’t talk to anyone, I don’t tell anyone my secrets. That’s just not my character. I’m better being myself.”

She’s very excited for the work coming up for the rest of the year. “I’m going to be producing my album now, and then I’ll be making an Ableton video for my single ‘Darkshade’ that was released today.” Although Collier is based in Wales, she’s very cognisant of staying in the public consciousness in territories beyond where she’s from. “We’ve learnt we need to keep building our presence here in the States.“ Sounds like us Americans might be seeing much more of Rachel K Collier in the coming months. Fingers crossed! Massive thanks, Rachel, for taking the time for this interview.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Leave Your Response

* Name, Email, Comment are Required
 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

All MP3s are posted with the permission of the artists or their representatives and are for sampling only. Like the music? Buy it.

RSS Feed   RSS Feed  

Learn More About Us