Hard Working Class Heroes 2016: Day 2 roundup (part 2)

By on Tuesday, 18th October 2016 at 3:00 pm
 

Missed any of my coverage of Hard Working Class Heroes 2016? No problem! Follow this link for the entire archive on TGTF, and part 1 of my Friday at the Dublin festival is through here.

Damola (Dublin) @ Tengu Upstairs

Okay, so I fully admit that I didn’t spend too much time upstairs at Tengu Friday at Hard Working Class Heroes 2016 because a hot, sweaty room full of people is not a fun place for someone who suffers from claustrophobia. And the place was like an oven, noted too by Damola as he yelled between songs to thank everyone for staying despite the oppressive heat. Of what I did hear, I was impressed with the Dublin-based Nigerian rapper’s command of the audience with his captivating beat-perfect vocals, the linchpin of this kind of music. Without it, you’ve lost the audience. In a world where Bob Dylan can win the Nobel Prize for literature on his basis of his body of work in the spoken and sung word, it stands to reason that one day in the future, a socially conscious rapper will do the same. And who better to do that than an artist who calls Ireland home?

Despite the discomfort, it was good experience, as the upstairs stage that night played host to acts part of the Word Up Collective. A Dublin-based group of musicians “like-minded souls working in hip-hop, spoken word, R&B, rap, pop and related genres”, it is inspiring to see a group like this coming together to support one another in what has become a dog-eat-dog industry. It’s very Irish. And it’s undeniable that the next great wave of new Irish artists will be the rappers and hip-hoppers only on the basis of seeing how many people bought tickets specifically to be in this room Friday night.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTTZrwKYOxA[/youtube]

Touts (Derry) @ Hub

I walked into the Hub in the middle of a cover of ‘Louie, Louie’ by Derry hard-rocking Touts. Not exactly a compelling listen. Following the rousing indie success of Dublin locals Girl Band, it’s not too much of a stretch of the imagination that the world is ready for another Irish punk band. Plenty of folks there were up for it in the place, though. However, it ended up sounding little more than a loud wash of sound and just wasn’t for me. I could be wrong though: come next year, they will be supporting Blossoms on their Irish and Northern Irish dates in March 2017. Could they be the Northern Irish answer to Slaves? Hmm…

Train Room (Ballas, County Mayo) @ Wigwam

In yesterday’s report of Exiles, I described stepping back into the ‘80s. Train Room from the small town of Balla in County Mayo, allows us to go back to the ‘90s. Not quite as introspective as shoegaze but with the feel good rock with a vague country bent like American band Gin Blossoms. They’ve just released a new EP, ‘Delicate Bones’, last Friday, which is worth checking out on Spotify.

While they’ve got several band members, it’s obvious Joe Monaghan on guitar is the master of ceremonies, leading his group with his evocative vocals. Sometimes his voice is paired with a female vocalist, who wears a flower in her hair on the same side of her head as I do. I’m sold!

Patrick Freeman (Dublin) @ Wigwam

In some of these reviews of my time at Hard Working Class Heroes, I’ve talked about things that seem to be unique to the Irish musician tradition. Like my first boyfriend who was born in County Cork, the Dublin-based Patrick Freeman spent much of his professional career as a session musician and touring performer. It wasn’t until 2014 when he struck out on his own and released his first EP; his debut album ‘Cherry Blossom’ followed in late 2015. With a full band backing him, his set at HWCH demonstrated his penchant for a smoky, throwback feel to his music. He even dressed the part with a patchwork denim shirt the Eagles would have loved in ‘70s California.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQHRciETvwU[/youtube]

Oh Joy (Dublin) @ Tengu Downstairs

In light of Ireland’s unique and engaging musical heritage, it is easy to forget Ireland’s connections to America, how many Irish emigrated during the Great Famine and thereafter to seek a better life. It’s only fair that the Irish took something from us, namely musical influences such as those heard through trio Oh Joy. Whether in the great tradition of anthemic rock via Springsteen or the pain filtered through grunge via Nirvana or Pearl Jam, this is Irish alt-rock with powerful guitars. The Dubliners made for a nice ending and a stark contrast to the two acts just before.

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