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SXSW 2017: Monday night variety, including Americana at the Swan Dive, pop at The Gatsby and rock at the British Music Embassy – 13th March 2017

 
By on Monday, 3rd April 2017 at 5:00 pm
 

After our arrival in Austin on Monday afternoon, Mary and I officially began our music festival adventures at SXSW 2017 on Monday night at the Swan Dive, which played host to a showcase of alt-country and Americana artists. We only stayed long enough to see one band, but it turned out to be a fortuitous choice, as the first act on the evening’s bill was outstanding Finnish duo Tuomo & Markus. (Mary also wrote about them in this previous SXSW 2017 review post.

Tuomo and Markus internal

Tuomo Prättälä and Markus Nordenstreng are each career musicians in their own right, but they came together recently at Wavelab Studio in my own adopted home of Tucson, AZ to record an album of contemporary Americana, with contributions from well-known friends, including members of Wilco, Calexico and The Jayhawks. Though the album, titled ‘Dead Circles’, has yet to be released outside of Scandinavia (its North American and European release is due later this year), I found out later in the week that Rolling Stone contributor David Fricke had already named it to his list of ‘New Albums from the Best of SXSW 2017’.

FRENSHIP internal

Following Tuomo & Markus’ set, Mary and I set out in separate directions (you can read her Monday evening review here). I headed to The Gatsby, which was playing host to the heavily-hyped and well-attended Pandora showcase. After a brief wait in the queue, I got inside just in time to see another duo act, FRENSHIP, whom I’d already encountered in my preview of Los Angeles bands at SXSW 2017. James Sunderland and Brett Hite’s high energy blend of organic songwriting with electronic dance music is immediately captivating, and their anthemic tracks ‘1000 Nights’ and ‘Capsize’ fit perfectly on the large, brightly-lit stage at The Gatsby. You can hear more about FRENSHIP’s Monday night set in my post-performance interview with them right back here.

"chk

The next act on the Pandora stage was Brooklyn-based dance pop band !!! (aka chk chk chk, if you want to say it out loud). They made an entrance worthy of all three exclamation points, and proceeded to shimmy and shake through a set that was equal parts glitz and Jazzercise. Their new album ‘Shake the Shudder’ is due out on the 19th of May, and if you love to dance, you’ll want to catch them on tour this summer: they already have dates scheduled in the UK and at home here in America.

Lo Moon internal

I’m not sure how I missed L.A. rock band Lo Moon in my aforementioned preview, but I was pleasantly surprised by their intense and atmospheric set on the Pandora stage. The video for their latest single ‘Loveless’ came out just after SXSW, and the drawn out anticipation of its slowly unfolding drama is a fair representation of their music, though they do make a much more powerful impact in live performance.

[youtube]https://youtu.be/bnXkMNyc794[/youtube]

False Advertising internal

Before the first night of SXSW could officially close, I naturally had to pay a visit to the British Music Embassy at Latitude 30. The last two bands on the DIY + TicketWeb showcase that evening were Manchester-based False Advertising and Exeter trio Muncie Girls. Both bands fall into the rock category, but False Advertisting were more on the fuzzy, grunge end of the continuum, while Muncie Girls have a brighter, cleaner sound. False Advertising do an interesting lead vocal/drums switch between Jen Hingley and Chris Warr, but as I was never able to see Warr’s face beyond his hair when he was singing, I think I’d have to say that I prefer Hingley in the forefront. Fellow frontwoman Lande Hekt of Muncie Girls had a more immediately engaging stage presence, though her pleasant smile was rather ironic, given the subversive lyrics behind her band’s catchy punk sound.

[youtube]https://youtu.be/wEhsPWHAhhY[/youtube]

Muncie Girls internal

Monday night at SXSW 2017 was a grab-bag of different bands and different sounds, but it was only the tip of the iceberg. Stay tuned to TGTF for my further accounts from the week in Austin, and if you haven’t been able to keep up with Mary’s fast-paced coverage of events, you can find everything collected right back here.

 

SXSW 2017: BBC 6 Music at the British Music Embassy, plus Spoon and friends at The Main (Thursday night, part 2) – 16th March 2017

 
By on Monday, 3rd April 2017 at 3:00 pm
 

Thursday night at SXSW 2017 at Latitude 30 was a showcase sponsored by BBC 6 Music and the UK Association of Independent Music (AIM). Carrie covered the first act, and I’ll let her tell you about her experience herself. I was able to catch the next three acts on the docket. Lookman Adekunle Salami, who goes by the more streetwise moniker L.A. Salami, is a singer/songwriter who has gentle and bluesy sides to his music.

LA Salami, British Music Embassy, Thursday 16 March 2017

Maybe I had missed his softer, introspective numbers because I arrived after my 5 bands in an hour test, but I was surprised by how loud he and his band was for what I did manage to catch. I realise that the British Music Embassy is the place for UK acts to be seen and to make an impression and while I did enjoy the funkiness of the performance, I felt disappointed the set sounded very similar from song to song. NPR seem to have realised this too, as they invited Salami to perform an acoustic number solo on the rooftop of the Hilton Austin, which I would have enjoyed more.

Meilyr Jones, British Music Embassy, Thursday 16 March 2017, 2

I’d been pulled left and right to see Meilyr (pronounced “MAY-leer”) Jones at SXSW, and Thursday would be the night I would finally get my chance. There are certain moments you always remember if you are covering SXSW as a music journalist: during the soundcheck, Jones waving and grinning slightly maniacally at me like I was a little kid as I was setting up my camera is one of those moments. Emcee for the evening Steve Lamacq commented that his sound reminded him of Aretha Franklin. White man from Wales, black woman from Detroit…how and why, exactly, would those worlds ever intersect?

Meilyr Jones, British Music Embassy, Thursday 16 March 2017

Listen to the big band foot-stomper ‘How to Recognise a Work of Art’, and you will understand exactly what Lammo means. The man also appears not to know – or understand – that the human body has limitations: this set was the first time I’ve seen anyone attempt the caterpillar on the Latitude 30 stage, coupled with what looked like spastic pop locking. Of any act I saw at SXSW, he was the unlikeliest (I thought anyway) to have fan boys, but there were a group of guys down the front who dance and screamed and shouted for more. He was their ‘Don Juan’, if you will. As echoed by many I spoke with, Jones was definitely an unexpected find for many in Austin for the week For sure, the British Music Embassy will never be the same again.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QlGwQYCw-5E[/youtube]

She Drew the Gun from the Wirral were up next. Louisa Roach and her band won Glastonbury’s 2016 Emerging Talent competition and they are a favourite of 6 Music’s, so their appearance on this night isn’t a surprise. After such a strange yet weirdly engaging set from Meilyr Jones, it was hard to get back into more standard indie rock mode. The socially conscious ‘Poem’ is a fragile moment deserving kudos for its content, but I felt unconvinced this was the year for them to come out to SXSW. After a handful of songs hanging out in that weird no man’s land between indie and folk but being neither fully, I left for my next adventure.

She Drew the Gun British Music Embassy, Thursday 16 March 2017

As mentioned in my review of the sexy title track single ‘Hot Thoughts’, Texan band Spoon took over The Main for a 3-night residency at this year’s SXSW. It was all in anticipation of the release of ‘Hot Thoughts’ the album on Friday. To be honest and based on how many people I guessed would want to see them, I didn’t think I had a chance to get into The Main for any of the nights they were playing. However, I had some luck that morning in getting a press pass for the final night, so that I could hear the single that had impressed me so much being played live.

For all 3 nights, barring the special guests announced on the day (Tuesday’s was The New Pornographers, Wednesday’s was !!!), nearly all of the bands supporting Spoon were from the local area. A fave of Spoon’s Britt Daniel, Sweet Spirit are proud to be an Austin band; their ‘St. Mojo’ album out this Friday is being released on Austin’s Nine Mile Records. ‘Collective’ is a better word to describe them than ‘band’: they currently have nine members and somehow all of them, plus all their equipment fit on the stage.

Sweet Spirit, The Main, Thursday 16 March 2017

I’ve seen ‘country rock’ bandied around to describe them, but you’ve never heard a country rock band like this before. ‘Take Me to a Party’, they do. With that many members, theirs is a cacophonous but entertaining mélange of sound and attitude. While I don’t think I’d choose to listen to a band like theirs – there’s nothing subtle or really artful about their music – they’re definitely a band who will get folks dancing. Trouble is, we were packed in like sardines on the floor, so dancing was impossible.

With anticipation building in the Main, I was pretty sure I was the only person in the room that didn’t know who would go on next. At first, all I saw was a cowboy-looking guy pacing on stage with visible anxiety and wondered who he was. It has been a while since his band went on an extended hiatus, with many of their members going on to their own solo projects. But I will always think of Hamilton Leithauser as popular Noughties American band The Walkman’s frontman. For his last solo album, he joined forces with Rostam Batmanglij, formerly of Vampire Weekend, to come up with ‘I Had a Dream You Were Mine’. Oddly for someone who has spent most of his adult life performing to people, I never got the sense that he was 100% comfortable on stage. Maybe he felt naked with his wingman Rostam?

Hamilton Leithauser, The Main, Thursday 16 March 2017

Older and wiser than his Walkmen days, Leithauser’s new career as a solo artist has been an interesting evolution. There’s a country air to some of the songs on his latest LP (‘Peaceful Morning’), which makes sense given his preference for an acoustic in live performance. But on LP opener ‘A 1000 Times’, he goes from crooner to tortured performer in the span of 4 minutes. Which is the real Hamilton Leithauser or rather, which guise will he choose going forward? Food for thought.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9FILAkKinQ[/youtube]

Britt Daniel had spent the evening passing in and out of the green room to periodically check on the proceedings. But now it was time for the main event, Spoon. The crowd roared to life when Daniel and co. took the stage; Daniel rewarded some fans who had probably been stood there since the venue opened that night by shaking outstretched hands and kissing ladies’ palms. ‘Do I Have to Talk You Into It’ to start the set seemed like a knowing joke to the devoted; ‘Hot Thoughts’ quickly followed it, bringing up the energy in the room that seemed to have been sapped out during Leithauser’s set.

Spoon, The Main,  Thursday 16 March 2017

But they weren’t there just to preview the new album. Spoon wowed punters with ‘Inside Out’ (with a synthesised harp?) and ‘The Beast and Dragon, Adored’ from earlier albums. I scanned the crowd and saw the look of wonderment on faces and every word to their older songs on their lips. Not only was I out of my depth, it no longer made sense for someone like me who wasn’t a massive fan of theirs to be second row from the front. At SXSW, I’m of the opinion that no-one should stay in a venue any longer than needed, and this is especially true if you’re not paying attention to who is onstage and your sole intention is to get drunk. You can do that in any bar without a band playing.

In a world when a lot of things are inherently unfair, leaving a packed venue to let the next super fan in the queue outside dying to get in is a simple act of kindness not enough people are willing to do. Bending my head down to speak into the ear of the young woman next to me, I told her I was leaving and to get ready to take my spot as soon as I made a move. She had a look of incredulity on her face, but it was clear she was grateful. In the end, this is a music festival for fans and full of fans. BE NICE. It isn’t hard to be nice.

 

SXSW 2017: how to see five bands in 1 hour, or editor Mary’s method to smash SXSW (Thursday night, part 1) – 16th March 2017

 
By on Monday, 3rd April 2017 at 2:00 pm
 

If your intention during your time at SXSW is to catch as many bands as possible, you’re in luck. Many of SXSW’s venues are close together. Usually the bigger problem is navigating around the people who aren’t as bothered from getting from point A to point B as you are. That’s avoidable if you detour around 6th Street. Is FOMO still a thing? Maybe everyone who is experiencing it just isn’t announcing it on the internet every 5 seconds.

If the terrible feeling does come over you, I have a solution for those I who worry they might be missing out on the Next Big Thing. It’s not for everyone and certainly not for the faint of heart, so put on your big boy/girl pants and buckle up. I’m going to tell you how I saw 5 bands in the span of 1 hour Thursday evening, and I will provide a few ‘rules’ on how to smash SXSW. None of the venues I visit in this summary were on 6th Street proper, so I feel like a bit of a champ rereading my schedule for the night.

Rule #1: Like switching the radio station or cueing up a new song on your favourite streaming service before the previous song finishes, leaving in the middle of a set, at least to old hands at this, is not only expected but to some extent, even encouraged. Be considerate to the performers and depart quietly to minimise blocking of the view of your fellow punters. Watching a pop band and not feeling it? Step outside, go down the street, and poke your head in to the next club and get some better dance or rock into you. You’ll find it, and it won’t be far.

Rule #2: Embrace venues that have one entrance and two stages to maximise your time in a venue while minimising your time in a queue. Barracuda (formerly Red 7 a few years ago), Scratchouse (formerly Holy Mountain), Cheer Up Charlie’s, Empire Control Room and its associated Garage (not to be confused with the Mazda behemoth set up this year) and the Mohawk are great examples of this.

So is Tellers, where I saw my first two bands of the night, clambering up the stairs, thinking that’s where I was supposed to be. This is where I happened upon The Gift from Portugal, and what a unique surprise they were. An astounding supporter of the band and as well as collaborator is Brian Eno: he cowrote and has produced songs from their latest album ‘Altar’. It appears his golden touch has already translated to a lot of positive attention for the group.

The Gift, Planetary Group showcase, Tellers, Thursday 16 March 2017

If you walked into the room not knowing anything about the band like I did, you’d probably think, “Liza Minnelli! Cabaret!” looking at camp frontwoman Sonia Tavares, looking vaguely gypsy-ish and like she stepped out of a ‘20s film. Yes, the keyword here is ‘theatrical’. The music started, with thumping disco beats and shiny synthpop. Evidently, the hype has extended its reach as far as The Great Escape, as the Portuguese band are headed there in May. Pencil them into your schedule, you have been advised.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMcSvtA4cqI[/youtube]

The Fontaines, Planetary Group showcase, Tellers, Thursday 16 March 2017

Creaking back down the stairs at Tellers, I resumed back on my planned schedule to see brother-sister act The Fontaines on the lower level of the two stages Planetary Group had curated for the evening. The four member, self-described ‘new-wop’ act barely fit on the small squarish stage, but this did nothing to deter singer Charlotte Fontaine, resplendent in red garb, from giving it her all in her performance. Conjuring up the soulfulness of Etta James and looking as sultry as Marilyn Monroe, it was a bit of a (good) head trip. Accompanied with their bass-heavy sound bringing the funk and things back to present day, what’s not to love? Tipped by me and Tidal ahead of them going out to SXSW, I reckon this band has a bright future ahead.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wGREc6huxs[/youtube]

Rule #3: Embrace and accept the stage delays and unexpected performers you come across. See my further thoughts on the Wednesday evening at Elysium, where the KCRW showcase was running behind schedule. Learn the art of chilling out. Scratchouse had taken over for the night by the Kosha Dillz Presents: Oy Vey showcase. Yes, Kosha Dillz is a meshuggeneh who funnily enough worked his way onto this 6 Music programme of Steve Lamacq’s from 2 weeks ago. A DJ was on the indoor stage when I arrived instead of who I was expecting…

Thankfully, there wasn’t too long of a wait for Los Angeles electropop Smoke Season to start. With their soulful tunes and wide smiles, Gabrielle Wortman and Jason Rosen seemed to be oblivious to the fact that people were still shuffling into the venue. They went for it and were soon rewarded for their dynamic show, with keyboardist Wortman putting her voice through its paces.

Smoke Season, Kosha Dillz Presents: Oy Vey, Scratchouse, Thursday 16 March 2017

Let’s be real, there are tons of electropop groups out there right now, so what sets Smoke Season apart? Wortman’s lead vocals – not to mention her firey ginger hair you can see from a mile away – can turn on a dime, from sultry and slow burning when she wants them to be, to delicate and wispy, to emphatic in a take charge kind of way. If you’re a girl and you’ve ever wanted to be a singer, chances are her voice (with all its quirks) is the kind you’ve always wanted. (If you were wondering, my particular alto range makes this impossible, sob!) As a complete package, I find Smoke Season exciting because they’re not a one-trick pony. Equally good at dreamy numbers (‘Emilia’) just as well as more complex, in your face pop tunes (‘Loose’), I found it hard to pull myself away from their set. But as they say, sometimes needs must.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DN2pL4pPcC0[/youtube]

Rule #2 was invoked again when I swung back west on 7th Street to Barracuda, where the Secretly Group showcase was also just coming to life. I’d seen Alex Lahey the day before at the StubHub / Culture Collide showcase at Banger’s, where she played in front of hundreds of people swilling beer and munching sausages at picnic tables. I was convinced her performance be different at an evening show, and I was at least right about the vibe. The slacker silliness and rapid fire lyrics of ‘Weekend’ worked better in full sun than it did at night, but it was still came off as fun. You just got the feeling an open-air festival would be a better venue for her.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GDBqxBbdWS8[/youtube]

Rule #4: Know when to leave – or better yet, not even join – the long queue. SXSW old timers like me know that you can waste a lot of time queuing to get into venues when you could be elsewhere, seeing a band and knocking back a drink. While there are times you’ll want to queue for your most favourite artists, know when you spot a queue that’s around down the street and many people deep (example: Rag ‘n’ Bone Man opening Friday night at the British Music Embassy) and make a quick decision to bolt if you conclude you don’t have a chance in hell of getting in. Related to this: instead of chasing the big names and the crowds, head for a less busy venue you know you’ll be able to get in so you’ll definitely see a band. Result!

Except for James Vincent McMorrow in 2015 there, we’ve never had a problem getting into and around the inside of Maggie Mae’s Gibson Room (not to be confused with the usually more busy Maggie Mae’s proper and Maggie Mae’s Rooftop). London slackers Happyness, who are gearing up to release their second album ‘Write-in’ on Moshi Moshi in the UK, were appearing on their American label Bar/None’s night there.

Happyness, Bar/None Records showcase, Maggie Mae's Gibson Room, Thursday 16 March 2017

I’ve always liked them much better on record, and I’m a little confused with what seems like a new direction to me. While still embracing the lo-fi sensibility from their previous LP ‘Weird Little Birthday’, I’m not following the Brian Wilson-y meets shoegazing style they’ve now embraced. Jonny Allan in a baseball cap further made me think, okay, so they’re chilled out dad rock now? Mind numbing. This was Thursday night, and most everyone in the room was sitting down. I’m not saying I need to headbang or dance every second when at SXSW, but as Simon Raymonde quipped at his talk at the convention center the next day, “I don’t love it.”

Running around Austin to catch as many bands as you can in an hour isn’t for everyone. But given the carnival of crazy SXSW is, I hope I’ve convinced you it is doable.

 

SXSW 2017: summary of SXSW Conference session Bella Union at 20

 
By on Monday, 3rd April 2017 at 11:00 am
 

In the course of its 20-year history, British independent record label Bella Union has become what you might call a “household name”, if your household were made up of musicians, music journalists, promoters, or other industry types. Headed by former Cocteau Twins member Simon Raymonde, Bella Union was originally founded as a vehicle for releasing Cocteau Twins’ own work, but it expanded to new ventures when the band broke up in 1997. Bella Union’s most acclaimed signees include artists like Fleet Foxes, The Flaming Lips, and Father John Misty, as well as TGTF alums The Trouble With Templeton, Midlake, Emmy the Great, and exmagician.

Bella Union internal 2

In celebration of Bella Union’s 20th anniversary, Raymonde was featured as a session panelist at SXSW 2017, along with Midlake frontman Eric Pulido (who also showcased in Austin with supergroup BNQT) and actor Jason Lee. Pulido’s appearance on the panel wasn’t surprising, but Lee was a bit of a question mark in my mind going into the Friday afternoon session. As it turned out, we had to wait a bit to find out what Lee’s role would be in the discussion, because he was delayed trying to find a parking space. Even featured speakers aren’t immune to busy downtown Austin SXSW traffic!

In Lee’s absence, Pulido took on the role of session faciliator, and he led a spontaneous conversation with Raymonde about the guiding philosophy behind Bella Union. As an experienced and successful musician himself, Raymonde emphasised the “gut instinct” aspect of his label’s work, saying that he strives to release music that genuinely strikes a chord with him on first listen. Pulido remarked that Raymonde’s diplomatic criticism often begins with the phrase “I don’t love it”, but doesn’t necessarily shut the door to future endeavours from promising artists. In fact, much of Raymonde’s success with Bella Union hinges on his openness to his artists’ perseverance. Midlake’s 2006 album ‘The Trials of Van Occupanther’ garnered critical accolades, despite Raymonde’s initial reticence about its unwieldy title.

Bella Union internal 1

When Lee arrived to take part in the discussion, he revealed that it was Raymonde who turned him onto Midlake back in 2004, around the band’s also oddly-titled debut LP ‘Bamnan and Silvercork’. Lee was immediately hooked and eventually directed a video for a single from that album called ‘Balloon Maker.’ The video, and Lee’s continuing enthusiasm for promoting the band, led to a more expansive collaboration, the documentary film ‘Midlake: Live in Denton TX.’

[youtube]https://youtu.be/JfFMPY72k_g[/youtube]

Raymonde highlighted the role of artist interaction and fortuitous timing in his discussion of Bella Union’s continued success. He named Midlake’s collaboration with American singer/songwriter John Grant as a prime example. Grant, who was a longtime fan of the Cocteau Twins, had initially contacted Raymonde during his time with The Czars, and though it took some convincing, Raymonde was eventually persuaded to take the production helm on the band’s second album ‘Before…But Longer.’ Raymonde’s dedication kept The Czars afloat until they broke up in 2004, but his relationship with Grant didn’t end there. Midlake’s artistic collaboration on Grant’s debut solo album, 2010’s ‘Queen of Denmark’ brought Grant back to Raymonde’s attention, and Grant’s fruitful partnership with Bella Union was renewed, continuing through 2013 album ‘Pale Green Ghosts’ and 2015 release ‘Grey Tickles, Black Pressure’.

One of Bella Union’s more recent protégés, singer/songwriter Holly Macve, also started with stroke of luck on Raymonde’s part. Macve had taken a job in a café in Brighton where Raymonde had set up a basement studio, and he happened to hear her sing at an open mic night. His ear for talent and the aforementioned “gut instinct” immediately drew him to sign her to the label. Macve made her American debut last year at SXSW 2016, garnering accolades from NPR among others, and she returned this year with a stunning debut album, ‘Golden Eagle’, under her belt.

Bella Union co-hosted a 20th Anniversary showcase with TuneIn Studios on the Wednesday night of SXSW, featuring current artists BNQT, Holly Macve, Mammut, Pavo Pavo, Will Stratton and Horse Thief. High-calibre artists like these represent the future of Bella Union as the label moves into its third decade of excellence among independent record labels. Stay tuned to TGTF for our coverage of Holly Macve at the British Music Embassy in our roundup of Thursday night at SXSW 2017.

 

Chain of Flowers / April and May 2017 English Tour

 
By on Monday, 3rd April 2017 at 9:00 am
 

Following their second visit to America and appearances at SXSW 2017 in mid-March, Cardiff post-punks Chain of Flowers are set to tour England in late April. Being the good Welsh ambassador that he is, the legend that is Huw Stephens interviewed several of the Welsh acts in Austin during the week of SXSW including Chain of Flowers.You can listen to the broadcast for the next 2 weeks on Radio Wales through here. During his chat with frontman Josh Smith on Thursday at the British Music Embassy, they discuss the slight incongruity that this tour only includes English dates. No matter; I reckon they’ll be back playing shows on American shores soon enough. Tickets to the following shows are on sale now. My review of their Thursday afternoon show can be read here; Carrie also caught them at the Music for Listeners afternon showcase at El Sapo, so her review of that is forthcoming. For more on Chain of Flowers on TGTF, follow this link.

Monday 24th April 2017 – Leeds Brudenell Social Club
Tuesday 25th April 2017 – Manchester Castle
Wednesday 26th April 2017 – Birmingham Hare and Hounds 2
Friday 28th April 2017 – Bristol Louisiana
Saturday 29th April 2017 – Southampton Joiners
Sunday 30th April 2017 – Brighton Hope and Ruin
Monday 1st May 2017 – London Camden Lock Tavern (free show)

 

(SXSW 2017 flavoured!) Video of the Moment #2331: Ryan Vail

 
By on Friday, 31st March 2017 at 6:00 pm
 

Derry electronic musician, composer and producer Ryan Vail was one of a handful of wonderful electronic acts I caught at SXSW 2017 who I couldn’t get enough of. Something I love about electronic composers is that they never seem to stop working. In honour of World Piano Day on Wednesday, the Northern Irish artist revealed two songs, one brand new and the other a rework of a previously released song, ‘East Berlin’.

The original of the two, instrumental ‘We Drift We Wake’, has an accompanying black and white promo video. The series of visuals chosen, showing both the natural and manmade world, provide the perfect foil to Vail’s composition, which darts in and out of, then above the shadows. Moments of broodiness morph into more uplifting ones before the song concludes with a softer, delicious delicacy. Watch the video below. For read more on Ryan Vail, go here; we’ll be adding to our archive on the artist as we continue our review coverage of SXSW in the coming days.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvsTMN_UUpw[/youtube]

 
 
 

About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

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