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(Liverpool Sound City 2015 flavoured!) Video of the Moment #1747: Stealing Sheep

 
By on Thursday, 19th February 2015 at 6:00 pm
 

The BBC may be having their 2nd annual 6 Music Festival in Newcastle this coming weekend, but the North was already raring to go for an exciting year in 2015. The lovely ladies of Stealing Sheep were announced previously to appear at Liverpool Sound City this May in their hometown, and now they’ve got exciting release news for us.

‘Not Real’, their second album, will be released on the 13th of April on Heavenly Recordings, and ahead of that, they’ve revealed the promo for the title track, which will also serve as the LP’s lead single. They’ve reinvented themselves, stepping back from their previously folk-inspired sound for something far more mechanised, yet also poppy. The mesmerising electronic beats (a far cry from ‘Genevieve’ from their first album ‘Into the Diamond Sun’) are a good match to the colourful, fun, and at times surreal visuals, reminding us how important visual art have been to the band. Watch the video below.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Q0UCBNYsms[/youtube]

 

Update: Liverpool Sound City 2015

 
By on Friday, 30th January 2015 at 9:00 am
 

They’ve been asking if they want to come back all these years, and this week it was confirmed that The Vaccines would indeed be coming back to Liverpool Sound City after a 2-year absence. They’ll be joining Belle and Sebastian and The Flaming Lips at the top of an already incredibly tantalising bill of talent.

The four-piece who shot to prominence of the back of their first album ‘What Did You Expect From The Vaccines?’ have barged their way back onto the scene in proper Vaccines fashion. That is, in the form of another 2-and-a-half minute banger, with guitars so fast you’ll miss them if you blink and a chorus as catchy as a cold at this time of year. The guitars are frantic, as they were on all of The Vaccines’ releases we’ve heard up to now, and the four-piece have undeniably stuck to the same formula that has worked so well for them over the last four years.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gV6eODKYHXI[/youtube]

‘Handsome’ may not have as killer a chorus as ‘Do You Wanna’, but it’s a fantastic pop song with wide appeal, there is no doubt. The new single is released on the 8th of March officially, but is already doing the rounds on social media and the radio, and all around it looks like everybody is pretty happy with what The Vaccines have produced. Will the album be on the same form? Well, from this evidence what can we expect from The Vaccines, more of the same…

As for who’s joining them on the bill at the rejuvenated Liverpool Sound City, which has been moved to pastures anew at the docks, there are some fantastic up and coming talents ready to catch the eye on Merseyside. Female four-piece Dum Dum Girls will bring a bit of shoegaze to the Sound City festival. Math rockers Dutch Uncles have also joined the bill and will be looking to move away from being a festival buzz band and to a group which can really excite people on a festival bill – is this festival the right platform? We shall see.

If overblown hipster chic is what you enjoy, eccentric duo The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger are certainly a feast for the eyes. Whether their off-colour take on psychedelic rock will captivate or confuse, they’re likely to be an interesting draw alongside Roni Size /Reprazent, The Thurston Moore Band, Gaz Coombes, F*cked Up, Evian Christ and Unknown Mortal Orchestra.

But with a BBC Sound of 2015 nomination and countless plays of their new single on Radio 1, the act I’m undeniably the most excited about catching a glimpse of at Liverpool Sound City (barring the headliners anyway) are Slaves. Their no nonsense approach on indie rock and incredible tunes like ‘The Hunter’ and ‘Where’s Your Car Debbie’ are certain to draw a capacity crowd to their slot at the festival, and as it did with me at 2000 Trees 2014, they’re almost certain to leave you asking, “Debbie… Where is your car?”

 

Preview: Liverpool Sound City 2015

 
By on Monday, 15th December 2014 at 9:00 am
 

Uproar. There’d be upper-middle class uproar in the streets of Soho if Worthy Farm were to be ditched in favour of a new location for the yearly Glasto bash. People would be throwing down their bowls in cereal bars and tossing their £4.50 mini-paninis in the air in Starbucks. Imagine Reading shifting itself from Richfield Avenue, or Download departing from Donington: it just wouldn’t be on.

These are just a few examples of why Liverpool Sound City 2015 will undeniably the most important year in the festival’s history. The festival is moving from the established inner city in and around Wolstenholme Square, where it has grown and evolved, to the Bramley Moore Dock. It’s a move that Sound City CEO Dave Pichilingi says aids in “our goal year on year being to evolve, grow, challenge, inspire, surprise and delight.”

It did surprise me, there’s no doubting that. As in its 2014 guise, the festival seemed to work a charm, with the tightly knotted interlocking streets of Liverpool city centre providing a maze for punters to stumble through on the way to the next new band they wanted to watch. The decision to ditch the old locations may have been assisted by the old area to soon lose one of its most charming venues, The Kazimier, and alongside this, TGTF favourite The Kazimier Gardens, two of the most atmospheric and chilled venues that the festival had to offer in its old guise.

So barring a location change, what else are the Sound City crew throwing our way to entice us to Liverpool? Well, the most recent headliner announced is bound to draw fans of all demographics to Liverpool. Even if they haven’t released a solid record since ‘At War with the Mystics’, The Flaming Lips (pictured at top) will arrive in Liverpool with one of the most notoriously fun live shows in tow for Saturday night. Frontman Wayne Coyne, who’s known to ride the crowd at the start of gigs in a zorb, is the kind of focal point who will sell tickets on the site of their name on the bill.

The festivals Web site also says, “the site change also opens Sound City up to bigger artists, the first being the legendary Belle and Sebastian, who will play on the historic Liverpool waterfront backed by a full orchestra.” Now after bearing witness to the power of some of Liverpool Sound City’s special sets – including a rousing performance by Noah and the Whale playing inside the Anglican cathedral with the rest of the TGTF crew in 2013, the prospect of the legendary group backed by an entire symphonic orchestra, to close out the event even, is enough to have me chomping at the bit.

So with only two announcements so far to sink ones teeth into, even in its new location the festival looks almost certain to be another success. The only question is, with two bonafide indie legends topping the bill, who have they got up their sleeves for the opening Friday? Most of the announcements have been a huge, welcome surprise. Who Friday’s headliner are is anyone’s guess, but I for one can’t wait to find out.

 

An Update on 2015’s Music Festivals

 
By on Friday, 10th October 2014 at 11:00 am
 

Photo above amen from Martin’s coverage of Kendal Calling 2014

The long, sunny days of summer festivals are now fading into distant memories. But behind the scenes things are moving apace. Autumn is the time where festivals are awarded their baubles – most toilets per head, gloopiest mud, highest concentration of dreadlocks per square mile, that sort of thing. And planning for 2015 is already under way. For those of us pining for those heady days and nights, here’s a quick update of the state of play for some of TGTF’s favourite events as we head towards the season before the season of festival season 2015. Or something.

Glastonbury

There’s a new record for Glastonbury ticket sales, many of which sold out before they were even released, leading keen industry observers, and many physicists, to further speculate about the invention of time travel devices in the not so distant future. Which would also explain Radio 4’s spookily accurate racing tips this week. Critics of such a theory point out that surely a time travel device could be put to better use than simply jumping the queue for festival tickets. Which is a fair point, although consider involvement of Britain’s favourite pin-up physicist, Brian Cox – it all starts to make sense. If D:Ream feature on Glasto’s bill next year, the hypothesis will be considered proven.

Kendal Calling

Everyone’s favourite non-mainstream mainstream festival, Kendal Calling has been nominated for four awards at the “prestigious” UK Festival Awards. They won Best Medium Sized Festival last year, and considering this year it was only a bit bigger, they’ve got a good shot at winning again. Suede’s performance is nominated for Best Headline Performance, which it was, at least for this correspondent. I’m not so sure about Best Toilets though – cubicles with no toilet paper or sanitiser within the first hour of the festival are hardly best practice. Mr A. Loos needs to do better. They’re also nominated for Best Family Festival, which brings us neatly to…

Deer Shed Festival

Never ones to rest on their laurels, Deer Shed have announced an expanded site and an expanded time-frame, introducing Sunday night camping for the very first time. Just like every other festival then, although the lack of Sunday camping has long been an attraction for parents wanting to get their kids (and, for that matter, themselves) in a comfortable bed at a reasonable hour for school on Monday morning. It’s back to the past for the first band announcement, which sees Dave Gedge’s Yorkshire indie pioneers The Wedding Present back for their first gig since headlining the first ever Shed. Early bird tickets are on sale today, Friday the 10th of October, at the bargainacious price of £89, so don’t delay if you like punky indie on the hottest North Yorkshire weekend of the year.

PS The Wedding Present are releasing several of their back catalogue recordings as multi-disc sets this October. With previously unreleased audio, TV footage, and ‘ephermera’, these will be for completists only. It’s nice to know there are still some out there.

Liverpool Sound City

And finally… Sound City have opened the application process for bands wishing to play the event in 2015. So for any readers with an unrequited passion to play at a world-renowned career-launching industry event, get your applications in without delay. You can’t fare any worse than Willy Moon.

 

Liverpool Sound City 2014: Day 3 Roundup

 
By on Friday, 16th May 2014 at 2:00 pm
 

For all my photos from Sound City 2014, head this way; for all my Sound City 2014 coverage from Liverpool, use this link.

Saturday at Liverpool Sound City 2014: on the homestretch now, but it’s also sad to know that something you’ve waited for all year is about to end. But I had something unusual to start my last day in Liverpool with: if it’s not music in Liverpool, it’s got to be football, innit?

The legendary John Peel was famously known as a Reds fan (good man) so it makes sense that the football tournament taking place during Sound City, a major music event for the town, is named after him. As much as I am a footy fan, I’d still not managed to make it to Chavasse Park, the nice stretch of green hovering above the hulking Liverpool One shopping district, over the last 2 years for the John Peel World Cup. That all changed this year when Geordies Boy Jumps Ship, the nice boys I’d met the previous night after I’d rocked out to their music, invited me to come watch them play five-a-side as Boy Jumps Ship F.C. Or as they had said, eke through a couple rounds of five-a-side and wonder why they’d agreed to play in the first place, the morning after they’d gigged at the festival.

I am sure John and Martin will get a kick out of this, but as can probably imagine if you’ve met me before, I’m not an athletic person (I prefer to be a sports bystander) so arriving at Chavasse Park, surrounded by loads of cute boys (albeit exhibiting varying shades of intimidation and being generally loud to match the intimidation) was akin to me being a duck out of water. I was, however, dressed to the nines for this, as I was sporting my new, perfect red Steven Gerrard jersey obtained from Anfield on Wednesday. So nyah!

Soon enough, I found the Boy Jumps Ship fellas in their white kit and even though the matches were only 10 minutes long, everything I watched at the park that afternoon was tense and fast-paced. I have to say, if you’re going as a spectator to this event, it’s sure a lot more fun cheering on your mates. Football expert John has said (threatened?) that he needs to participate in the tournament next year, so keep that in mind as a definite reason why you should attend Sound City 2015.

I didn’t hang around for the finals but from all accounts, Boy Jumps Ship was doing pretty good when I’d left to meet up with my next interviewees, Dave Bayley and Joe Seaward, who were sound checking with their band Glass Animals at the Kazimier. The Kazimier, along with the Zanzibar, would prove to be the most important venues of the night to me, which judging from this post-event report from famed Liverpudlian music man on the street Peter Guy, turned out to be a smart move.

Red Found Glory @ Zanzibar

While I waiting for my next interview subject Tommy Wright, the well-coiffed frontman for Young Kato, who was delayed, I had time to kill. Going off our Irish friends Kodaline‘s earlier Tweets, I skulked around the inside of the Zanzibar to look for them, as they’d said first band up Red Found Glory were a good shout and they were hoping to make it in to see them before they were due on to headline at the Cathedral that night. (I guess they are friends?) I don’t know if it was anxiety waiting for Tommy or if these guys from London were just not very unique, they were a good enough rock band I suppose but nothing special jumped out at me.

Glass Animals @ Kazimier

I thought I’d mosey back to the Kazimier for Glass Animals‘ set. It’s quite ironic that Carrie fell in love with their music (at the Harvest Records showcase Tuesday night at SXSW 2014) before I did, because the dance / urban sound is much more my thing than hers, but I really wasn’t having any of “those peanut butter vibes” initially. Saturday at SXSW during ‘Black Mambo’, Carrie was going mental (then again, it was everyone’s last day in Austin, so everyone present was already sauced by noon) and maybe I was off that afternoon, but I wasn’t completely sold. Until I saw them in Liverpool, that is. Playing to a daytime crowd in Austin at Latitude 30 is entirely different than playing a rammed Kazimier, filled down the front with women with drink in hand, grooving to the music in their summer dresses. Maybe it was the magic of Liverpool that made me finally see what I had been missing for months?

While Martin waxed philosophical about them in October of last year and described their song ‘Exxus’ as having “mellifluous mellotron mixes with otherworldly, disembodied voices, as if Gyorgy Ligeti and Edgar Froese were having a bromance right there in one’s Eustachian tube”, I found something more tangible and oddly down to earth about the band’s sound. Songs like ‘Hazey’ from their forthcoming album ‘Zaba’ and yes, that ‘Black Mambo’ tune show a collected coolness from Bayley and crew that seems to be at odds with most of the music I saw at Sound City. The music slides and glides seemingly effortlessly and judging from the fact at their first American headline show in New York Wednesday night sold out well in advance, America is ready for Britain’s latest hip dance export. It was inevitable that they would end their set with ‘Gooey’, but why not when it’s the most recognisable of their songs to date and the one that brings the house down every time?

I rushed away after them to the Brooklyn Mixer with every intention of catching Pennsylvania’s The Districts. You’re probably wondering why I was bothering to catch a band from the state directly due north of mine, but I had a good reason: I missed them at this year’s SXSW. Just like Thursday night, I knew something was amiss when I arrived. For one, there were all these non-Anglicised shouts of approval and I had to ask someone at the door who was playing, because they didn’t look American. I guess the Districts cancelled, as a Brazilian band the Parrots had stepped in for them. I stayed for a short while since I didn’t like what I heard, I went back to the Kazimier to ready myself to see We Have Band, who I’d been waiting to see for years. Who should I run into on my way back but Glass Animals loading out? A discussion between Dave Bayley and me of various places in America ensued. Oh, English music festivals. You never cease to amaze and amuse me!

We Have Band @ Kazimier

We Have Band‘s ‘Divisive’ from their debut album ‘WHB’, one of my favourite dance anthems of 2010, was the sole song I had on my mind initially. I figured they had to play it and if they didn’t, I’d be quite cross, ha! And it didn’t disappoint at all live. But the band had a more important mission that night with their set: to get out the new songs from their brand new album ‘Movements’. Measured in its chaos yet also glittery synth-wise single ‘Modulate’ saw sole female band member Dede Wegg-Prosser take centre stage, and she commanded attention from the word go, whether it was when she was singing or she was gyrating on stage in minimalist black clothing, which no doubt wasn’t lost on her male admirers. Another album cut, ‘Heart Jump’, was a dance revelation on steroids, with its relentless beats, and even after such a short festival set, the crowd was sweaty but yelling for more. With their flurry of synths, bass grooves and drum pad beats, they were definitely worth the wait!

After the excitement of We Have Band, I wanted somewhere to chill and it occurred to me that maybe the best plan of attack would be to stop in at the Zanzibar, where I had planned to see Young Kato later. It was with major disappointment that I learned of Dublin’s the Minutes cancelling their Sound City appearance in favour of performing in their hometown that day instead, but considering they haven’t gotten a record deal for ‘Live Well, Change Often’ in the UK, I guess it kind of makes sense that they wouldn’t bother with trying to promote an album in a country where people can’t actually buy it.

Serotonin @ Zanzibar

I’m not sure where the band Serotonin is from (there are several on the interwebs), but they haplessly filled in for the absent Irish band. Who wears black turtlenecks in Liverpool, unless you’re a beatnik from the Sixties? Also, me and another female journalist were laughing at what the frontman was ‘packing’ in his trousers… You just couldn’t take them seriously.

Young Kato @ Zanzibar

After a changeover, Young Kato were next, and I was happy to explain to punters not familiar with them about their history. Well, at least the fact that they were on Made in Chelsea, but perhaps in hindsight, that’s not a good factoid to offer up to the more discerning music fan? Either way, it didn’t matter.

Although I was situated on a sofa overlooking the stage for most of their set (hey, it was Saturday, I was tired, don’t judge), I was standing up and cheering like the rest of the audience for them. Tommy Wright did his job in ‘selling’ the free mp3 ‘Ignite’, which we gave away in this previous MP3 of the Day post; as usual, the sparkly ‘Lights’ went down a treat, as did ‘Revolution’, which seems like an unlikely competitor in a town with a band with an untouchable history with a song of the same name. Naturally, the song that concluded the proceedings was ‘Drink, Dance, Play’, which has become the band’s rallying cry: is this the sound of young Britain? I certainly hope so, I’d rather it be Young Kato than Bastille.

Public Access TV @ Zanzibar

I would have been happy with them ending my Sound City experience this year, but I was convinced by some newly made friends that I should wait for the next band, Public Access TV (not to be confused with London historical PSA-repurposers Public Service Broadcasting, who were without a doubt making a big noise on the next street over at Nation at the same exact time). After I left Liverpool, I did some research on Public Access TV to find that NME had tipped the New York band for big things at the start of the year and that Lindsay Lohan was in attendance during one of the group’s earliest performance. (Er, so what?) I’m truly confused. As I watched them, I saw nothing special: guys with guitars…playing pop with a tinge of guitar. Hello, the Strokes? Michael Hann of the Guardian has since jumped onboard this bandwagon, presuming off the back of their appearance at the Great Escape the following weekend and I’ve figured out why everyone’s putting their money on the band (finish Hann’s article and you will see what I mean).

But just because a band has talked to the right people doesn’t mean they’re good. See them live and decide for yourself. That’s the greatest thing about a festival like Sound City: it just goes to show when a great place like Liverpool can put on hundreds of bands over a weekend, you’re bound to find music that will astound, make you think, is just plain fun, or all of the above. Make the most of such an opportunity.

 

Liverpool Sound City 2014: Day 2 Roundup

 
By on Thursday, 15th May 2014 at 1:00 pm
 

For all my photos from Sound City 2014, head this way; for all my Sound City 2014 coverage from Liverpool, use this link.

While it was my intention to see as many bands as I wanted to off my Thursday Liverpool Sound City 2014 schedule, by the time I woke up Friday morning, I was feeling it. Oh no, oh no, oh no! The worst thing as a music writer to wake up to: a painful sore throat. After two scalding hot milky teas did not seem to do the trick, a quick stop into Tesco’s on Bold Street to grab some honey lemon Strepsils (as Radcliffe and Maconie and Marc Riley say on their radio programmes, other shops and lozenges are available) was required. And then I was off again, though not with the same get up and go as the previous day.

Thanks to a tip from Chris Donnelly of Sounds of Now Music, I had initially pencilled in the mysterious Moats as a possible early band to catch. However, as it so happens to all of us, hunger set in and I ended up meeting with an industry friend at the amazing Leaf Cafe where I’d seen Sivu close out the night before in fine fashion. They do amazing food and, of course for a place with the word ‘leaf’ in their name, a fine cuppa for a bad throat (thanks all).

The Orielles @ Shipping Forecast

After I’d gotten sufficient food in the tummy, it was time to head back out for our friends The Orielles, who were playing the cramped Shipping Forecast where Traams had got tail feathers shaking late Thursday evening. They were slotted in at the unenviable time of 7, just like Prides the night before, except the downstairs room of the Shipping Forecast was actually packed. Good for them! Funnily enough, the two girls at the delegate greeting table at the Hilton were stood right next to me, I think a little startled that I was there, snapping photos.

You can read more about the Orielles’ live performance in my review of their ‘Entity’ single launch party at Manchester Deaf Institute on the 26th of April through this link and you can also listen to them live in conversation here, but I think the more important take home message from their Sound City appearance is their confidence. It’s a good word to describe the trio, as I’ve seen lesser – and dare I say it, older – bands quake under the pressure of a industry-related festival such as Sound City, but the Orielles are professionals. In a confined space like this, they had nowhere to run – literally – and all eyes were on them. Yet they were calm, cool and collected, which is exactly what their style of surf pop demands. I’m really looking forward to seeing where their music takes them.

Strangers @ Brooklyn Mixer

Then I was off to see someone (or three someones, as I expected) back at the Brooklyn Mixer. Maybe it is just my personality to want to help as many deserving people as possible, but I’ve found it inevitable – in an entirely good way, I might add – that bands we’ve discovered and fallen in love with (and often times, those that you readers have fallen in love with too) become friends. Electro dance act Strangers appeared at #2 on the TGTF 10 for 2012 way back at the end of 2011 and even though I’d corresponded with frontman David Maddox-Jones for years it seems, for one reason or another I always missed seeing them gig in London. When I was scanning the schedule between panel sessions on Thursday, I noticed their name on the Friday. David explained to me that they were asked to fill in last minute. Naturally, I seized the chance to finally see them live.

With his awesome wingtips, Maddox-Jones was the height of fashion. Unfortunately, it was to Strangers’ detriment that the punters present for their set seemed more keen on their pints and less on the electronic music on offer right in front of them. However, as I stood watching Maddox-Jones give it his all – he’s got a fine set of pipes full of soul and emotion there, for sure, and he gets entirely caught up in the music, his body never stopping for a moment – I couldn’t help wonder how the performance would have been helped with an entirely different environment. I remember Delphic saying in an interview once that they’d requested a German festival put them in a greenhouse-like tent for their performance at an event so that the mood was as dark and clubby as possible, and I think that’s exactly the kind of venue I’d want to see Strangers at. As for the three someones I previous mentioned? Piers Sherwood-Roberts has left the band so Strangers is now a duo, though I suppose you could argue with two guys on synthesisers, do you really need a third, if between two people you’ve got one manning the synths ably and the other with a voice perfectly suited to the music?

The Inkhearts @ Kazimier Gardens

There was no time to stay and exchange pleasantries after, sadly. I was off like a rocket to catch The Inkhearts, who oddly popped up in conversations all over my 2-week holiday across England. They’re a young student band from Skelmersdale who appeared at the Label Recordings showcase at the atmospheric Kazimier Gardens. ‘Keeping Up’ is the Inkhearts’ current single, and it’s getting airplay all over the country already (apparently it’s a hit particularly with a radio presenter in Cornwall), which is a good sign as any that these kids are on to something good. And as we know, ‘Something Good Can Work’… I don’t like waving my press badge around at any festival if I can help it (it’s pretentious), but sometimes desperate times call for desperate measures, and the bouncers were not letting me in, so waving and yelling saved the day and got me into the place finally.

I think it’s a testament to the good people of the North West that such a showcase was put together to promote young talent and give them a proper way to show off their hard work and what they’re all about. (Read more about the label based at Edge Hill University here.) Yes, they’re young, but you can tell there is a definite desire of wanting to make it, and looking on at these youngsters, you can’t help but feel a sense of pride and that the future of the music business will keep going on the talent and energy of kids like them. I could barely keep up with my own studies when I was in school, so I know that these four who are doing the music on the side while also trying to further their education must have their hearts in the right place. After I interviewed the Inkhearts in the upstairs atrium (and apparently gave them a Stuart Maconie factoid to take back with them to school the next week), Heebie Jeebies beckoned.

Model Aeroplanes @ Heebie Jeebies

With the sheer number of and different kinds of venues at Liverpool Sound City, there’s no use guessing which bands will draw packed houses. Model Aeroplanes from Dundee, who I’d also had the pleasure of chatting with but earlier in the day at the Hilton, deserved a larger crowd but given the low archways I described from Thursday, I’m almost glad it wasn’t packed, because had the place been rammed, it might have been a serious fire code violation.

As it was, the vitality of the Scottish band’s live performance was impressive. Model Aeroplanes’ set, which included new single ‘Electricity’ and closed out with the sweeter ‘Innocent Love’, was energetic like the Inkhearts earlier but in a different way: they’re older, so I think the hunger for fame seems more real to them, especially since they’ve got the support of BBC Radio Scotland’s Vic Galloway and success is seemingly within reach. We had agreed about how Two Door Cinema Club‘s first album was better than their second, and I hear whispers of Two Door in their music: a compliment that they’ve got a very poppy, fun sound and happy guitars that I could see taking Britain and the world by storm very soon.

Boy Jumps Ship @ Mello Mello

I had a little bit of time before I said goodbye to the Model Aeroplanes lads and make my way to Mello Mello, where the Generator proper of the North East was hosting their night at Sound City. I’ve made it a point each year I’ve covered the festival to listen to and watch all the videos of every band scheduled to showcase in Liverpool, especially the ones I’d never heard of, to get a nice smattering of bands on my spreadsheet that I’d otherwise not have known about. Boy Jumps Ship from Newcastle was on the top of that new discovery list and I realised within seconds of seeing them live that I’d definitely made the right decision seeing them.

When I first started music writing, I seemed to spend a lot of my time trying to convince people either by word of mouth or through my writing that it was possible for a dance band to write something emotional, because those kinds of bands are hopelessly misunderstood. In a way, hard rock bands suffer from the same misunderstanding, depending on the company you’re with. I could see in the case of Boy Jumps Ship, fans of theirs probably generally are already fans of that genre of aggressive, devil may care kind of rock. But how does a band like theirs relate to someone like me?

I went into Sound City somewhat of a broken, exhausted woman from personal stuff and somehow, the honesty and just pedal to the metal-type delivery of this hard-rocking Geordie band ticked off all the right boxes for me. In my head, their music sounded of letting go, about laying it out on the line, of giving it all you’ve got. Live, they’re just so incredibly fun to watch: frontman Si Todd growls into his microphone and bangs his guitar ferociously as his bandmates play their instruments frenetically to keep up the pace.

There is a reason why Arcane Roots and Marmozets chose them as their support: both bands knew they could bring it. While the band say in my interview with them that they would love to tour with Biffy Clyro, I wonder if one day soon they will surpass the Biff entirely. While I also heard snatches of current radio darlings Royal Blood emanating from the Duke Street Garage around the corner later that night, I couldn’t help but think that all those people crammed inside there were watching the wrong band and should have caught Boy Jumps Ship instead. Those Geordies sure have heart.

 
 
 

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There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

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