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Live Gig Videos: Alessi’s Ark, The Crookes and Lianne La Havas perform acoustic sessions for Tramlines 2013

By on Friday, 26th July 2013 at 4:00 pm

In what’s like a bunker – an acoustically sound bunker – at this year’s Tramlines, the festival hid a couple acts away to record some really lovely acoustic sessions for all of us to savour.

First, Alessi’s Ark, aka London singer/songwriter Alessi Laurent-Marke, performs a stripped back version of ‘The Rain’ from her album released this year on Bella Union, ‘The Still Life’.

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Next, we’ve got local boys the Crookes performing ‘American Girls’, one of the singles off their 2012 Fierce Panda album ‘Hold Fast’. The choice of song seems rather appropriate given this Tweet from them yesterday! (Mmm yes indeed. The American half of our writership is very excited about this touring prospect.)

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Finally, we have Lianne La Havas (pictured at top performing at Alexandra Palace in 2012) all by her lonesome with her acoustic guitar, playing ‘Tease Me’.

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Interviews: Dutch Uncles and Public Service Broadcasting chat at Tramlines 2013

By on Friday, 26th July 2013 at 11:00 am

I like a festival that actively seeks to film interviews, performances and sessions with the wealth of talent they have appearing at their event. Earlier this week we posted bands’ thoughts on this year’s Tramlines in Sheffield, as well as some live stage performances. This morning we have some exclusive chats filmed by the festival.

First on tap are Dutch Uncles‘ Duncan Wallis and Andy Proudfoot chatting about their year so far – including their support slot with American rock band behemoth Paramore – and what it’s like for the Marple band to come to play in Sheffield.

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Following that, we have Wilgoose and Wrigglesworth of Public Service Broadcasting being interviewed by the Guardian’s New Band Up North columnist Emily Brinnand, ahead of their appearance at the Harley.

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Live Gig Videos: The Heartbreaks, the Jim Jones Revue and Wet Nuns perform at Tramlines 2013

By on Thursday, 25th July 2013 at 4:00 pm

This afternoon we’ve got for you some really spectacular live performances from this year’s Tramlines festival in Sheffield. First up, the Heartbreaks from Morecambe are at the Harley performing ‘Liar My Dear’, which frontman Matthew Whitehouse describes as being “about being a very, very naughty boy in a seaside town”. Ooher…

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Next, we have the growly, garage rock stylings of the Jim Jones Revue (pictured at top) on the Main Stage at Devonshire Green, playing ‘Righteous Wrong’ from their blistering 2010 album ‘Burning Your House Down’.

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Finally, Wet Nuns bring their punishing guitars and beats in this video taken at their Academy show.

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Tramlines 2013: The Bands Speak

By on Wednesday, 24th July 2013 at 11:00 am

Not counting the varying levels of success in 2006 to 2008 at a Baltimore racetrack and since 2009 when Richard Branson brought in the Virgin Mobile FreeFest to Merriweather Post Pavilion (the venue, not the Animal Collective album), Washington DC doesn’t have a major music festival. And the FreeFest doesn’t even attempt to cater to people who might not be mainstream music listeners, such as myself. I wouldn’t drive anywhere to go see the Black Keys or Jack White, just two examples of previous FreeFest headliners. Most other American festivals suffer from the same problem. They focus on getting huge names that the MTV watching public would enjoy. Coachella and Lollapalooza, anyone? Despite John and Martin’s urging that I need to do one at least once, I don’t think I could survive the massive camping festivals, so city festivals, with their many venues dotted across one given place while also allowing me to sleep in a real bed for the night, are very appealing to me.

This year I decided to pay more attention to a local UK city festival that has been going on for a couple years and seem to be doing it right: while they bring in big names to headline the main stages, there is a whole wealth of bands, big and small, playing traditional venues to the town cathedral. I am, of course, speaking of Sheffield’s Tramlines, which I had understood from the get-go had been an idea borne by local Sheffielders such as Arctic Monkeys’ Matt Helders, Jon McClure of Reverend and the Makers and Toddla T.

Even the name of the festival, inspired by the friendly-looking tram transit network I admired when visiting the city in the spring, seems to indicate the pride the festival organisers have just by being from the city and wanting it to remain something very special to the people that live there, yet all the while being entirely welcoming to those who choose to come into town to enjoy it with them. It’s hard not to have your heart warmed when you hear things such as Festival Director Sarah Nulty talking about this year’s event, “A huge thank you to everyone who attended and made it a truly wonderful event. The fantastic weather on Friday set everyone in a great mood which lasted across the site all weekend. Musically it was a great year for Tramlines with so many talented artists on the bill. Through Tramlines we get to showcase exactly what Sheffield has to offer and we’re very proud of it.”

John and I have been in discussion that next year we might just join forces and go finally, having looked jealously as this year’s line-up and whinged that we weren’t there. Who was there were the bands, of course. We’ve asked several of them to weigh on their Tramlines 2013 experience, so here we go…

Andrew Parry, keyboardist, Story Books:
Tramlines 2013 was our first band trip to Sheffield, and what a pleasant one it was. Tramlines is one of those inner city festivals that takes over an area of a city, encouraging sprawling crowds on streets and music coming out of its ear holes. Situated a few yards away from the aforementioned tramlines, our venue of battle was The Bowery, a cosy bar with a stage the precise dimensions to squeeze us and our gear on. This made for a real fun set. Nice and close in, we forgot any inhibitions and had a ruddy good time. The crowd were attentive and appreciative, with many a complimentary post-gig word. Which is all you can ask for isn’t it? That, and chips and gravy. And ‘scraps’. We’ll be back, Sheffield. Cheers.

Fran O’Hanlon, vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, Ajimal:
The cathedral might have been the most beautiful construction site I’ve ever played! Unfortunately, the body of the cathedral is being renovated, but the sound was pretty incredible none the less, such a beautiful and massive space. There was a bigger crowd there for me than I expected, which was lovely to come out to, and really attentive – those kind of venues always seem to inspire pin drop silence.

It was nice to wander round and get a sense of everything going on in Sheffield at Tramlines. I also managed to catch Dutch Uncles who I’d been meaning to see since their last album came out. Brilliant band.

James Leesley, vocalist and guitarist, High Hazels (read my Bands to Watch on them here):
To collectively summarise the weekend in two words, hectically pleasant would probably be accurate. Saturday was a day where we had three shows to play, the first being inside the Sheffield Cathedral. I think we were all particularly excited about playing in the cathedral, it’s quite a rare place to play and sonically speaking, it has a natural sound that we strive for within a lot of our music. The gig surpassed all our expectations and went really well – the audience sounded like they enjoyed it which is always a good sign. Along with the Cathedral, we played at Weston Park and later at Shakespeare’s, which was our highlight. There was a great atmosphere and it was a fitting ending to a very good day.

Sunday, we were on at The Bowery in the afternoon which was another full house and a great show. It was a good way to draw the curtains on our playing for the weekend and we were all really pleased with the response and quite humbled by the way we were received.The rest of the day was the first real chance we had to catch some of the other bands and join the traffic of the festival, which is always nice.

We thoroughly enjoyed it and are looking forward to next year.

Eddie Dullaway, guitarist, Van Susans:
After a 4-hour drive and two festival gigs in Kent on Saturday, we arrived in Sheffield’s Weston Park for the first of two performances. As we were setting up there was an apparent air of anticipation. A crowd, not on their feet, but sitting waiting for the next eargasm. We made for a musical fixation, drawing in with technical interludes and catchy hooks; our set time was halved but it kept us short and sweet and the crowd eager for more!

Our second show was at The Forum at 10.30 PM so with a little time to spare we engaged ourselves in frisbee, interviews, football, eating and more interviews. It was also Olly’s birthday, so a small amount of alcohol was consumed! The second show came bringing much of the crowd from the first into The Forum for an acoustic show which equally entertained the listeners. Overall, it was a brief, hectic but energetic day. We left Sheffield at around 12 AM to return to base (Bromley, Kent) and arrived home at 4.30 AM just in time to see the sunrise.

Ben Duffy, vocalist, Fenech-Soler:
Sheffield, for me, felt like it all clicked from a live perspective. It takes some shows and some experiences to fully get to grips with new material, especially the way we make our music. On the first record we had hundreds of shows testing things out but Tramlines felt like we were fully comfortable. We hadn’t actually slept in few days as we’d come straight from Switzerland so that just added to the mental state on stage. It’s nice getting totally lost in a performance. It’s also always hard at festivals playing songs that no one knows but the reaction has really made the last 12 months worth it. We’re just looking forward to releasing ‘Rituals’ (their second album out on the 2nd of September) now.

Dave Fendick, multi-instrumentalist, Fossil Collective:
Tramlines was pretty cool. We love playing in Sheffield, and it’s always good to be so close to home (as we can sleep in our own beds!) Although the weather forecast predicted rain, it held out and it was nice to arrive and see everyone lounging about, drinking beer and soaking up the vibe.

Playing on a bandstand instead of a normal stage was a nice touch. It made a change from the normal festival stages that we play. The crowd were very receptive too. (The cheap beer helped!) It was a nice family vibe, with lots of little stalls selling a variety of food and drink. We stayed on for a bit after the gig, talking to various people who’d seen us by chance and who were very glad that they did.

We left having made some new friends, and hoping that we get another invitation next year.

Tom Sanders, vocalist and guitarist, Teleman:
We played in the afternoon on Sunday, the weather was calm and temperate and everything seemed nice and relaxed. I don’t think many people knew our songs, or who we were, but that didn’t seem to stop people from enjoying it. I always think these kinds of festivals are about just wandering round and discovering new music anyway. Some of the best shows I’ve seen have been entirely by accident. Sheffield seemed a perfect setting for the festival and I can only see it going from strength to strength!

Bridie Jackson, vocalist and piano and guitar player, Bridie Jackson and the Arbour:
We played two gigs at Tramlines on Sunday, starting off with The Folk Forest, where we enjoyed some great music and our first Pimm’s of the season! The atmosphere was fantastic and the audience were great – we even managed to get them to join in with our rather whimsical Justin Timberlake cover.

Our second gig was at The Riverside, which boasted the highest ratio of cellos on one stage that we have ever seen! All the music was excellent, but particular highlights were The Early Cartographers, The Pocket Satellites and Joe Banfi. Again, the crowd were great and fun was had by all.

Matthew Whitehouse, vocalist and guitarist, The Heartbreaks:
Arrived in Sheffield at about 8 PM. Sat in the van outside the Harley mixing vodka and tonic in the bottle until Russ and Tom from the Crookes walked past and Russ gave us some promotional Red Bull cups. Tom was eating a margarita pizza. Saw the singer from Grammatics (who we went on our first UK tour with) and met the singer from Komokino, who our tour manager Mark used to drum for. Charlie Bone was there too. At about 5 past 10, we walked out to Sharpe’s ending theme as sung by Rifleman Daniel Hagman and played seven songs, including ‘Polly’ for the first time since February. Joe did a nice new drum bit at the end. Dedicated a song to Richard Sharpe and no one laughed. Ate an entire packet of custard creams.

Tom Dakin, guitarist, The Crookes (photograph below from the stage by drummer Russell Bates):
Tramlines is comfortably the highlight of the musical year in Sheffield, and will always have a place in our hearts. We’ve played at every year of the festival and it has been thrilling seeing it grow from its smaller roots into the city-wide, all encompassing event it now is. Every day on our route to our practice room in town we cross the green where the main stage is (Devonshire Green) during the festival, and it’s hard to believe it’s the same place when we’re stood onstage looking out at all the people.

This year has been particularly special for Sheffield music, which really is the lifeblood of our city. Bands such as Hey Sholay, Seize the Chair and High Hazels are just a few of the brilliant new wave of Sheffielders breaking through, and 65daysofstatic created a stunning combination of three-dimensional music and visual effects which left us wondering if our minds would ever be the same again as we wandered in a daze from their installation at the Millennium Galleries.

Needless to say, as the dust settles on this year’s Tramlines, all we can do is try to shake off our hangovers and begin the countdown to next year’s festival. May there be many more.

Crookes Tramlines 2013 sm

And that’s it from the bands of Tramlines 2013. Funds and time off from work willing, we’ll be in the thick of next year’s festivities so we can experience first-hand what always sounds like one of the best UK city festivals of the summer. See you soon, Sheffield!


The View / November and December 2013 UK/Irish Tour

By on Monday, 22nd July 2013 at 9:00 am

Scottish band The View have announced a massive tour of the UK and Ireland for this winter. Tickets are on sale now.

Saturday 23th November 2013 – Bristol Thekla
Sunday 24th November 2013 – Portsmouth Wedgewood Rooms
Tuesday 26th November 2013 – Oxford Academy 2
Wednesday 27th November 2013 – Gloucester Guildhall
Thursday 28th November 2013 – London Scala
Friday 29th November 2013 – Southend Chinnerys
Saturday 30th November 2013 – Windsor Fire Station
Monday 2nd December 2013 – Galway Roisin Dubh
Tuesday 3rd December 2013 – Cork Cyprus Avenue
Wednesday 4th December 2013 – Dublin Academy 2
Thursday 5th December 2013 – Belfast Limelight
Saturday 7th December 2013 – Cardiff Clwb Ifor Bach
Sunday 8th December 2013 – Birmingham Academy 2
Monday 9th December 2013 – Leeds Cockpit
Tuesday 10th December 2013 – Liverpool EVAC
Thursday 12th December 2013 – Manchester Ruby Lounge
Friday 13th December 2013 – Preston 53 Degrees
Saturday 14th December 2013 – Sheffield Leadmill
Sunday 15th December 2013 – Newcastle Hoults Yard
Tuesday 17th December 2013 – Carlisle Brickyard
Wednesday 18th December 2013 – Glasgow Academy
Thursday 19th December 2013 – Inverness Ironworks
Friday 20th December 2013 – Kilmarnock Grand Hall
Sarurday 21th December 2013 – Edinburgh Picture House


Arctic Monkeys / October and November 2013 UK Tour

By on Friday, 5th July 2013 at 5:00 pm

Sheffield’s Arctic Monkeys will be heading out on an arena tour of the UK this autumn, ending with a hometown show at Sheffield Motorpoint Arena on Saturday the 2nd of November 2013. Due to demand, they’ve just announced a second London Earls Court date. Tickets are on sale now.

The Monkeys’ next album ‘AM’, their fifth, will be out on the 9th of September on Domino.

Tuesday 22nd October 2013 – Newcastle Metro Radio Arena
Wednesday 23rd October 2013 – Manchester Arena
Friday 25th October 2013 – London Earls Court
Saturday 26th October 2013 – London Earls Court
Monday 28th October 2013 – Liverpool Echo Arena
Tuesday 29th October 2013 – Cardiff Motorpoint Arena
Thursday 31st October 2013 – Birmingham LG Arena
Friday 1st November 2013 – Glasgow Hydro
Saturday 2nd November 2013 – Sheffield Motorpoint Arena

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About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest tours, gigs, and music we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like idiots.

The blog is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington DC. She is joined by writers in the UK and America. It was started up by Phil Singer in Bristol, UK.

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