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Live Gig Video: New Order reveal live performance of ‘Temptation’ from Bestival 2012, related to new charity album

 
By on Wednesday, 10th July 2013 at 4:00 pm
 

Similar to this album that the Cure released in 2011, the current incarnation of New Order have released ‘Live at Bestival 2012′, a charity CD to support the Isle Of Wight Youth Trust. This video just released is of the legendary Manchester band bringing it to the festival last year to perform ‘Temptation’, in all its 9-minutes plus glory. Watch it below.

New Order’s ‘Live at Bestival 2012′ is available now from Rob da Bank’s Sunday Best label, with all proceeds go to the Isle of White Youth Trust, a charitable, independent and professional organisation offering counseling, advice, information and support services to young people aged 25 and under who live on the Isle of Wight (the home of Bestival, natch) and, in some cases, their parents or carers.

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Preview: Kendal Calling 2013

 
By on Tuesday, 9th July 2013 at 3:00 pm
 

What do you need to know about Kendal Calling? It’s taking place this year 26 to 28 July and it’s situated in a beautiful part of the Lake District, easily accessible from Scotland, northern England, and even somewhere like Coventry is less than 3 hours away. The entertainment lineup is superb this year, possibly one of the best ever, and the festival has already been dubbed “The Glastonbury of the North”. This may be so, but its sensible size means there’s still a pleasant local feel to the event. The great news for TGTF readers is that at the time of writing there’s still a handful of tickets left for Kendal Calling this year, so let me tempt you with some tasty morsels of what’s in store…

There’s two excellent places to watch bands – the Main Stage with its big names, and the equally promising Calling Stage with up-and-coming and alternative acts. The big headliners appear to come in pairs each night, and Friday sees Chuck D, Flava Flav and DJ Lord taking a brief holiday in rural Cumbria – yes, it’s Public Enemy, fresh from a triumphant Somerset set, looking just as angry as ever, and ready to rip your ears off with their politically-charged flow. And who better to get the first evening’s party started than Basement Jaxx, the perennial pop-dance outfit with a string of hits longer than a wet weekend in Barrow-in-Furness.

For those of a less party persuasion, the Calling Stage has some real gems on the first day. Concrete Knives were twice superb at Liverpool Sound City, and they’re back across the channel for a rare UK apperance with their funk-laden musique raffinée. Foy Vance and his incredible voice will surely deliver a soulful, acoustic interlude, Waylayers add an early afternoon dance vibe with their summery, Balearic-influenced tracks, and TGTF favourites The Heartbreaks (who editor Mary just interviewed in London a couple weeks ago at the Scala) will supply their stylish, upbeat, typically British guitar-pop sound as the sun goes down.

And for night owls, there’s any number of DJ sets, the biggest of which take place in the Glow Dance Tent, where your late-night shenanigans are enhanced by the no doubt head-scrambling presence of LEDs, lasers and enough UV light to bring on cataracts ten years early. Friday will see Oneman, remixer of The xx and TLC and purveyor of minimalist yet grimily atmospheric techno, young Brightonian Dismantle who specialises in “sort of dubstep”, young Lancastrian duo Bondax and their intimate, blissed-out electronica, before climaxing with Artwork, who, as one-third of Magnetic Man, released one of dance music’s biggest albums in 2010.

And then it all happens again on the Saturday! Highlights from the Calling Stage include Welsh art-pop from Sweet Baboo, delicate folk stylings from Fossil Collective, and an opportunity to see what all the fuss is about London Grammar – are they just an xx rip-off or is there something more there? Unmissable on the Main Stage are Mike Skinner and Rob Harvey’s intriguing project The D.O.T.; there’s an opportunity for people of a certain age to rock out like it’s 1996 with Ash, and I Am Kloot bring their delicate songwriting and ensemble melodiousness to life just before Saturday’s headliners The Charlatans (pictured at top) reveal whether or not they’re any good any more.

Sunday is surely the strongest Main Stage lineup – having had to suffer the ignominy of being Tom Watson’s favourite band, hopefully Drenge will play with even more venom and spirit today; and I don’t really need to explain anything about what is effectively a triple-headline bill: Johnny Marr, Seasick Steve and Primal Scream bring the whole affair to a resounding climax. As if that’s not enough, there’s a distinct drum ‘n’ bass flavour to the Glow Tent on Sunday, with Grooverider warming up for none other than Sir Roni of Size. World-class stuff.

And of course there’s stacks more going on around the site. There’s an entire jazz strand called Riot Jazz. Chai Wallahs have their own acoustic and chill out stage. The Houseparty is apparently someone’s front room transported to the middle of a field with loads of random stuff going on: world-class DJs, punk bands, and perhaps a bit of karaoke – and don’t forget Leeds’ Wind-Up Birds – the underground tip for set of the weekend. There’s the Woodlands stage (maybe that’s in, um, a wood?), where all the acts with the best names are playing; the Soap Box, a lighthearted variety show which has previously hosted Howard Marks and John Cooper Clarke; and a tea shack run by Tim Burgess himself! Not forgetting the little ones: there’s the Ladybird area with different fancy dress each day, and crafts and workshops galore.

With so much going on, and the festival capacity limited to just 13,000 people, Kendal Calling is surely every decent festival rolled into one – the music is top-class, but with just a fraction of the crowds which you could expect at a bigger event. As we go to press there’s just a handful of tickets left (go here for more information), so you’ll need to be quick if you want to be there!

 

Preview: Lodestar Festival 2013

 
By on Friday, 5th July 2013 at 5:30 pm
 

In terms of summer music festivals, Cambridge was previously best known as the locale for the Cambridge Folk Festival. Not anymore, it shouldn’t. It’s very odd but this was the first time we’ve been contacted about Lodestar Festival, taking place just 15 minutes outside Cambridge city centre. This year’s event takes place 30 August to 1 September, and in its family friendly programming, it could very well be the South’s answer to Deer Shed Festival (Well, I’ll have to consult Martin about this, obviously…) We’ll also be running a competition related to the event in the coming weeks here on TGTF so…

But for now, let’s concentrate on what we do best, the music, shall we? The headliners for this year’s Lodestar are brilliant: Friday will see rising South Devon singer/songwriter Ryan Keen, Saturday’s festivities will star our good friends The Joy Formidable, with Ritzy Bryan holding court as shown in the header pic and Canada’s Dragonette will close out the festival by getting bodies bumping with their brand of dance funk.

However, just watching music is not just the only focus of Lodestar. Fancy bringing out your inner Gloria Estefan? The Pan-Jam workshop will allow you to try out steel drums, the instrument that brings calypso and reggae music their distinctive sound; other workshops are yet to be announced. Did our Oxford mates Stornoway ever make you curious about the sport of zorbing? You can do that at Lodestar, along with archery and power kiting. Comedy and dance troupe performances are also scheduled.

Adult mid-bird tickets are still available for £64 for all 3 days, with only £5 extra for your tent or caravan. Comparable mid-bird tickets for 15 to 17s are £56 for 3 days; children 14 or younger are free. For more information on tickets, visit the official Lodestar Festival Web site.

 

Live Gig Video: Miles Kane plays ‘Come Closer’ at Glastonbury 2013

 
By on Monday, 1st July 2013 at 4:00 pm
 

If you missed any Glasto 2013 coverage and whether you live in the UK or not, the BBC has kindly put quite a few videos of the action online. Like this one of Miles Kane appropriately closing his set on Friday night on the John Peel stage with a blistering rendition of ‘Come Closer’. Wearing a Union Jack on his chest, no less. Watch it below.

Kane will be touring England this autumn; all the dates and details are here.

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Preview: Deer Shed Festival 2013 (Part 2)

 
By on Thursday, 27th June 2013 at 9:00 am
 

We’ve already previewed the extensive small- and big-kid friendly activities available at Deer Shed Festival 2013, but what of the music? Featuring full 2 days of music (Friday evening, Saturday all day, and Sunday afternoon), and a smattering of stages, this isn’t your run-of-the-mill enormo-fest, and is all the better for it. The entire card is quality, but here we run down some of the highlights of Deer Shed 2013’s music offering…

Friday night sees a clash-tastic triumvirate of triumphant talent. Edinburgh festival favourites Tubular Bells For Two take over the In The Dock stage all night – for those who haven’t heard, TBFT are Aussies Daniel Holdsworth and Aidan Roberts, who have taken it upon themselves to recreate Mike Oldfield’s multi-layered masterpiece Tubular Bells in its entirety, complete with a home-made set of the eponymous melodic percussion. An inspired booking, and a rare opportunity to catch TBFT in the fresh air.

Gaz Coombes proved with his diverse work with Supergrass that he’s one of the finest songwriters of his generation; his solo album ‘Here Come The Bombs’ superbly reinforced that reputation. He’s just put out a new double-A single: ‘One of These Days’ is a typically bittersweet string-enhanced 4 minutes of slow-burning goodness, marking an intriguing move into gentle electronica stylings; ‘Break the Silence’ is a more upbeat synth-led stomper with hints of Supergrass’ superb 2004 orphan release ‘Kiss Of Life’. Which all bodes well for the second album which is rumoured for imminent release.

In a fairer world, Gaz Coombes would be the highlight of the evening. But if Coombes’ star is still developing, Edwyn Collins’ is a full-on supernova. There’s no need to go over the old ground of his medical history (if you need the details, see here), suffice to say that Collins’ personal story is as remarkable as his music. His 2010 LP ‘Losing Sleep’ gathered my Writer’s Choice for a Mercury nomination that year; this year’s release ‘Understated’ continues his output of smart pop-soul, hinting obliquely at his trials, but mostly simply affirming the human condition in matchless, witty style. A true legend, revered warmly by industry and fans alike, and a great way to wrap up Friday night at Deer Shed.

Saturday afternoon is folky and soulful. Tynesiders and Craig Charles favourites Smoove and Turrell (John Turrell is the male voice of Charles’ Fantasy Funk Band) are perfectly timed to get the crowd into a groove; Zervas and Pepper soundtrack dreams of shimmering open plains and dusty roadhouses; To Kill a King purvey that keening, yearning folk-rock sound that has such broad appeal these days that will surely make them a highlight of the day for many.

Elsewhere, Spring Offensive bring their suave Oxonianisms to the In The Dock Stage. If you like atmospheric, emotive guitar music, and wish you had seen Radiohead live before they released ‘The Bends’, the Spring Offensive are not to be missed. Neither are The Phantom Band, whose sound genuinely defies classification. There’s detailed multi-movemented arrangements, pepperings of atonality, a touch of ‘Green’-era R.E.M., and even the hint of properly heavy guitars on occasion. Very difficult to describe, which means that they’re very clever indeed. Worth being acquainted with beforehand, but will reward the effort live.

Darwin Deez has a lot to live up to – the punditry casually bandy around names like Beck, Prince, and Hendrix whenever he’s mentioned. Yes, Deez displays a loose, carefree obscurantism that Beck would be familiar with, but there’s little evidence of the epic sweep of Prince, or indeed of Hendrix’s Stratocaster majesty. Perhaps his live show will answer the doubters. But most excitingly of all, Saturday night finds The House of Love on the main stage. Surely the most underrated band of the pre-Britpop era, The House of Love’s self-titled meisterwerk contains future echoes of The Stone Roses, James, and both Oasis and Blur, and without whose influence British pop music would surely have taken a different, and undoubtedly inferior, path. Despite such achievements, in comparison with their peers they remain relative unknowns, with founding member Guy Chadwick carving a second career fitting sash windows. The story of the band is no less remarkable than their music, featuring personal acrimony, heavy drug use, mental problems, countless spin-off side projects, and the inevitable ritual burning of banknotes – enough to fill a decent book, one would imagine. Will The House of Love find their final redemption in their reformation and release of new material? Will Deer Shed be where it all finally comes together? One waits with bated breath.

After the excitement of Saturday night, Sunday is wind-down day. The Unthanks bring to life the North-East’s history of heavy industry and hard living with ‘Songs From The Shipyards’, and band-of-the-moment Public Service Broadcasting (who we caught last month in Newcastle) offer a similarly historical yet rather more lighthearted take on this island’s history with their audiovisual tour-de-force. On the main stage, we have chilled-out ambience from AlascA, knowing ensemble wittiness from Moulettes, and the acoustic finale belongs to the avuncular King Creosote, who has a challenge on his hands to match the vertical, punch- and love-drunk ambience of last year’s Cherry Ghost set.

If it had escaped your notice, this is just part of what’s on offer at Deer Shed Festival this year. Take a look at my Part 1 for a roundup of the crazy catalogue of activities to lose yourself in. Tier three tickets are still available from from the official Web site – but probably not for much longer!

 

Download Festival 2013: Day 3 Roundup

 
By on Tuesday, 25th June 2013 at 2:00 pm
 

The brow of a Viking longboat protruded ominously from the Zippo Encore Stage as Amon Amarth summoned their otherworldly brand of Norse-themed metal to that sullied pasture on day 3 of Download Festival 2013. Drummer Nico Mehra held fort underneath the ship’s sail (with cymbals spilling over port and starboard), whilst his fellow barbarians lined up along the front in headbanging unison. The opening track – ‘War of the Gods’, from their 2011 album ‘Surtur Rising’ – was a merciless display of melodic death metal with .50 calibre double bass line and a soaring solo. Save vocalist Johan Hegg’s guttural growl, ‘The Pursuit of Vikings’ had a pace and riff focus similar to that of some Megadeth tracks, whilst ‘Deceiver of the Gods’ was one continuous crescendo from the Swedish quintet. The relentless ‘Twilight of the Thunder God’ turned out to be their final track, with the set cut short as a result of technical difficulties earlier in the day, sealing the gate to a portal the crowd were willingly throwing themselves into.

Metalcore five-piece Vision of Disorder shun the traditional trappings of spikes and leather as they take to the Pepsi Max Stage and, not for the first time, it’s sound system delivers a level above that of the Main or Zippo Encore stages. Unlike their studio recordings, loud seems to be the sole dynamic, but this only serves to feed the sense of release as the pit claims more victims. The chorus to the hook laden ‘Set to Fail’ was returned with fervour by the crowd, followed up by the likes of ‘What You Are’ and the pummelling marching beat of ‘Blood Red Sun’.

Red Fang might just snatch the award for the most underrated band of the festival, in terms of their spot in the line up at least. Frequently given as a second or third answer as a band fellow Downloaders wanted to see, the Oregonian four piece’s own brand of stoner metal had already received an unexpected recommendation from Motörhead’s own Lemmy Kilmister the day before. It took a while for most of the crowd to realise the people on stage were not, in fact, roadies, but they eventually slammed into their massive opener ‘Malverde’, which had echoes of Tool’s 2006 album ‘10,000 Days’ in its staccato verses. ‘Wires’ has a relentless, almost Queens of the Stone Age edge, with a killer key change on the chorus and mesmeric finale. It was followed up by ‘Into the Eye’, from their latest album ‘Murder the Mountains’, and ‘Sharks’ from their debut Sargent House EPs. Their final track, ‘Prehistoric Dog’, is arguably the biggest to date, and fans got involved the only way they know how; by smashing into each other in homemade beer can armour.

It’s safe to say that with Airbourne – musically at least – you know what you’re going to get. At Sonisphere 2011 lead vocalist and guitarist Joel O’Keeffe scaled the scaffolding of the second stage (20 metres or more), kicking their set to new heights, literally. They seem to keep a keener eye on the talent at Download, unfortunately, but the pace of the Aussies AC/DC-esque hard rock was just what the doctor ordered for a weary crowd. They rattled through staples ‘Ready to Rock, ‘Cheap Wine & Cheaper Women’, ‘Black Dog Barking’ and ‘Wave the Flag’ before ‘Live it Up’ had the fists pumping and the crowd warming their vocal chords. And, just in time. Next up was the infectious ‘Too Much, Too Young, Too Fast’, the most successful track off their 2007 album ‘Runnin’ Wild’. The eponymous single from this album capped off the set, sliding neatly into a rendition of the riff from Black Sabbath’s ‘Paranoid’.

So many questions need to be asked about the involvement of 30 Seconds to Mars on the Main Stage at this point in the festival. Surely, this was Limp Bizkit’s slot; another band that had success in the early Noughties, and would have drawn the same crowd. Instead two almighty waves of people had to navigate through the detritus and up the hill to escape Jared Leto’s turgid peacocking. Having secretly camped among us plebs at the festival last year, you can tell he’s picked up some tips from Metallica and Slipknot (probably from 2 nights previous) on how to put on a decent stage show. Unfortunately, the personal spin he put on it resulted in nothing more than a flood of brightly coloured yoga balls being dropped onto a heavily spiked crowd, and a nonplussed reaction to attempts to get everyone down on their knees. They played the usual fluff, including: ‘Birth’, ‘This is War’, ‘Conquistador’ and ‘Vox Populi’, before the MTV2 Award-winning ‘The Kill (Bury Me)’. Leto doubled the precipitation count for the weekend by inviting a group of blubbing fans on stage for their final track ‘Up in the Air’, so someone appreciated them at least.

Limp Bizkit had the Zippo Encore Stage full to bursting as fans clamoured to catch a glimpse of singer Fred Durst and his new Gandalf look. And, with a set comprised largely of tracks from their 2000 breakout album ‘Chocolate Starfish and the Hot Dog Flavoured Water’ – named ‘Worst Album of the Year’ by Entertainment Weekly whilst simultaneously becoming the fastest selling rock album ever – they could almost let the crowd tackle this one alone. Opening with live favourite ‘Thieves’, by second track ‘Rollin’ (Air Raid Vehicle)’ it was evident that these nu metal forerunners had matured, combining gut-shuddering bass with a willingness to experiment. Of course, “all the people in the house” did “put their hands in the air”, and by their third offering, ‘Nookie’, everything from bottles to bog rolls was being lobbed skyward.

A huge swathe of the crowd broke away like a tectonic plate at this stage as headliners Rammstein (pictured at top) were set to take to the Main Stage. The rest of Limp Bizkit’s set was peppered with classics, from ‘My Generation’, ‘Livin’ it Up’ and ‘Full Nelson’, to ‘Take a Look Around’, ‘My Way’ and ‘Break Stuff’. There was even time to squeeze in a couple of covers; the predictable spin on George Michae;’s ‘Faith’ and a rapturous version of Rage Against the Machine’s ‘Killing in the Name’.

Somehow Rammstein managed to remain something of an unknown quantity until taking to the stage as the curtain closers of Download 2013. Their live antics are so legendary that it’s tough to separate the fact from the fiction. What transpired was an avante-garde opera; a jaw-dropping amalgam of industrial machinery, art school sexuality, Dante’s ‘Inferno’ and ‘The Rocky Horror Picture Show’. Vocalist Till Lindemann descended from the rafters on a spark sprinkling platform to their opening track ‘Ich tu dir weh’ (‘I Hunt You’), clad in a fluffy pink coat over his grimy overalls and folding himself into a ‘Silence of the Lambs’ stlye mangina (not the first that’s been witnessed this weekend). Next, ‘Wollt ihr das Bett in Flammen sehen?’ had 90,000 pumping their fists in marching rhythm to chants of ‘Rammstein’, and allowed them their first opportunity to indulge their passion for pyrotechnics. ‘Keine Lust’ saw sparks flying from the lead singers hands before the sinisterly vulnerable cries of “mir ist kalt” at the song’s climax. After, Lindemann and guitarists Richard Z. Kruspe and Paul H. Lambers all donned flame spitting masks and lit things up for the bombastic ‘Feuer frei!’.

Keyboardist Christian ‘Flake’ Lorenz took his first beating of the night as he was wheeled out in an oversized cooking pot for ‘Mein Teil’, before being roasted with blasts from increasingly larger flamethrowers. The sadomasochistic Lindemann bathed unprotected under a shower of sparks for ‘Ohne Dich’, before chasing a (fake) rogue crowd member across stage with a flamethrower during ‘Benzin’, like some sort of cabaret golem. The set proper finished with a potent run of ‘Links 2-3-4’, ‘Du Hast’ and the rousing ‘Ich Will’. After a solo off with guitar mounted flamethrowers, their infamous live track ‘Bück dich’ saw Lorenz in a gimp outfit and chaps being buggered by Lindemann on a 20-foot riser, with the latter foaming everyone on the front rows with his prosthetic appendage. After the crowd had cooled off, they returned for an encore with a heartfelt piano-only rendition of the epic ‘Mein Herz brennt’ and the melodic ‘Sonne’, but Lindemann couldn’t resist pulling out an even bigger foaming appendage to violate the crowd during their final track ‘Pussy’. Even so, this audience had not been screwed.

So, as the piano rang out on an instrumental rendition of ‘Ohne Dich’, the writhing masses were left to reflect on a festival that promised so much, but delivered even more. No UK festival can match the passion and honest release witnessed every year on Donington’s hallowed fields. And, despite all the hype over next year’s potential headliners, for many, next June can’t come soon enough.

 
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About Us

There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest tours, gigs, and music we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like idiots.

The blog is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington DC. She is joined by writers in the UK and America. It was started up by Phil Singer in Bristol, UK.

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