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Live Gig Video: Hudson Taylor share live version of ‘Feel It Again’ at Dublin Olympia

 
By on Tuesday, 17th July 2018 at 4:00 pm
 

Irish duo and brothers Hudson Taylor have a new live video for us this. We previously posted an acoustic version of single ‘Feel It Again’, which the pair released to the wild in late 2017. Now, they have an even more special live version of the same song, filmed in the venerated Dublin Olympia. Having seen the Staves there 3 years ago, I was able to experience the beauty of the historic theatre in the heart of Ireland’s capital first-hand. In this live video, whether you’ve been to the Olympia yourself or not, you can feel (no pun intended) the energy from the performance, as well as all the famous acts who have passed through the Olympia’s doors and played on the very same stage. Watch the performance by Hudson Taylor from March below. The duo have a whole host of summer festival appearances to come in July and August. In the autumn, they’ll be Hozier‘s special guest on his autumn American tour, then go on their own UK headline tour in November; all of their live dates can be found on their Facebook events page. For more writings on the talented Irish act here on TGTF, use this link.

 

Live Gig Video: Fatherson share ‘Making Waves’ from upcoming third album ‘Sum of All Your Parts’

 
By on Tuesday, 26th June 2018 at 4:00 pm
 

Scottish trio Fatherson have a new album out this autumn. To preview the upcoming LP, they’ve unveiled ‘Making Waves’, which shows a definite change in direction for the Scots. Frontman, guitarist and famous beard owner Ross Leighton explained the song “defined how the album would sound” and it being a “heart on your sleeve slacker tune with a tonne of groove.” Slacker is right: the guitars are loud on this new song, and with the muscle of the track, it’s no wonder that when it came time to present the song to the public, they would use a physical way to convey its feeling. In the video, the three-piece are performing the song indoors, accompanied by an interpretative dancer. Watch the video below. ‘Making Waves’ will appear the band’s third studio album ‘Sum of All Your Parts’, which will drop on the 14th of September on Easy Life Records. To read our past coverage on Fatherson, come through.

 

Live Review: Ciaran Lavery with Dustin Furlow at Jammin’ Java, Vienna, VA – 21st June 2018

 
By on Monday, 25th June 2018 at 2:00 pm
 

It isn’t too often that I attend a seated show. As some of you know, Carrie is the singer/songwriter wonk on staff, not me. I’m used to standing in front of loud amps for whichever pop, rock or electronic gig I’ve chosen for the night. I felt pretty much out of my element, but perhaps this is me turning over a new leaf. Are laidback coffee shop gigs in my future? Have I ::cough:: gone soft? I’ll chew on that thought another time.

I arrived just as American Dustin Furlow began his set. He’s from Virginia Beach, pretty much on the opposite side of the state, but of course not as far as the Northern Irish headliner had to travel. Furlow is an award-winning singer/songwriter, billed as one of the most accomplished in Southeastern Virginia. Something that is nigh impossible to reproduce as other club shows is that gentle, priceless intimacy between artist and fan in a place like this. There’d be a sense of awkwardness in those clubs from both parties if a story like Furlow’s about his drunk on bourbon, shirtless father floating in water, the inspiration for ‘Cherokee Lake’, was told from the stage. And yet, when the story is told at Jammin’ Java, it is a touching tale.

Dustin Furlow Jammin Java 2018

I admit to writing off most singer/songwriters if the melodies and lyrics they offer are weak. What became clear through the two instrumentals in the set alone is that Furlow is a virtuoso on acoustic guitar, something rare and not applauded in popular music these days. Watching his fingers dance across the fretboard was pretty incredible, and this is coming from someone who gave up on guitar because remembering the chords was too hard. When he sang, a surprisingly soulful voice came out on songs like ‘Evergreen’ from his 2017 EP ‘Solo’ or a jaunty cover of the Lindsey Buckingham-centric Fleetwood Mac foot-stomper ‘Big Love’ to close out his set.

TGTF have had wonderful opportunities to cover Northern Ireland’s Ciaran Lavery the last few years, mostly around his appearances during SXSW 2016 and 2017. I wonder why the alt-folk troubadour from the village of Aghagallon isn’t a household name yet like Frank Turner. For me, there are two things that make Lavery stand out head and shoulders above everyone else: his emotional, honest lyrics delivered in a gorgeous Irish brogue. Pretension doesn’t exist in his songwriting, as each tune shows Lavery’s heart on his sleeve.

Ciaran Lavery Jammin Java 2018

Early on, he impressed with the rawness of social anxiety chronicled in ‘Shame’ on his 2013 debut LP ‘Not Nearly Dark’. This past spring, he released ‘Sweet Decay’, his third studio album; at this show, he described how writing with others and having to worry about their opinions as an uncomfortable situation. You couldn’t hear this at all in the a cappella version of the title track he delivered stood in front of us, all in white as a model of vulnerability with aplomb. Lavery’s piano cover of The National’s ‘Bloodbuzz Ohio’ was an unexpected triumph, finally making the song palatable to me. ‘Wicked Teeth’, a song about going to the dentist (allegedly!), comes across sweetly, revisiting the theme of vulnerability and combining it with love and desire.

Between songs, he seemed entirely relaxed, as if he was giving us a performance in his front room for his best mates. When he asked if anyone in the crowd wasn’t from DC, an audience member yelled, “Dublin!” Lavery chided him with, “you know, I recently played there and with my whole band, you didn’t have to come this far!” Laughter. His story about his trip on Aer Lingus to the States and his difficulty in using their thin, tiny provided blanket was relatable to those of us who have attempted this during a transatlantic flight. Good-natured snufflings abounded. This is a down-to-earth guy with an honest heart and eager to talk to strangers in bars. If you’re lucky enough to live in one of the North American towns he has left on his tour of our continent through the start of July, spend an evening being spellbound by him and his music. He plays tonight at the Horseshoe Tavern in Toronto.

Ciaran Lavery Jammin Java 2018 2

 

Live Review: ONR. with CrushnPain at DC9, Washington, DC – 15th June 2018

 
By on Monday, 18th June 2018 at 2:00 pm
 

I’ve said it before, but it bears repeating: now more than ever, if you haven’t got a song that pulls the listener in and keeps their attention for more than 30 seconds, you’re sunk as an artist. On the more positive flipside of that, if you are a good songwriter and can write the kind of compelling song that stays with the listener, this talent will pay off massively in terms of getting your music paid attention to. Singer/songwriter Robert Shields, who now performs under the moniker ONR. (pronounced “honour”), is definitely one of the latter. In various projects and under various guises, he’s been quietly honing his craft, which has led to a major label signing last year, after Capitol Records industry bods heard his particularly strong demos.

It’s still early days for the Dumfries-via-Glasgow Scot and his live band: there are only a handful of ONR. singles out to date. An American tour this month, comprised of support dates with SXSW 2017 breakout American star Mondo Cozmo and their own headline dates, is, then, this continent’s first live taste of what amazing things Shields and co. can do. The support dates were announced first and I assumed I was out of luck, as the closest show to me was New York’s Mercury Lounge and on a Wednesday night. To my great excitement, headline dates were soon added, including a stop at my favourite intimate venue in the city of all, DC9, and late on a Friday night to boot.

CrushnPain Washington 2018 2

Two local acts preceded the Scottish band’s performance. My friend and I were too late to see electronic band Honest Haloway, but we arrived in time to witness one-man band CrushnPain. Looking remarkably like a bespectacled close Irish friend of mine, producer Austin Gallas looks unassuming behind two synths and a remarkably small set of controllers. Don’t judge a book by its cover: I was surprised and happy to enjoy his catchy jungle beats as he threw himself into his music. I bopped my head and moved my body to music that was better than some electronic acts I’ve seen at SXSW and The Great Escape. He rarely sang, but when he did, the vocals were dream pop variety and repetitive. To be fair, dream pop lyrics run a spectrum from ephemeral and intentionally lacking substance to floaty, yet thought-provoking. If he was shooting for the former, mission accomplished.

Recall that the first time I saw ONR. was last month at the massive Paganini Ballroom upstairs at the Old Ship Hotel. It was Friday night at The Great Escape 2018, and a massively promoted BBC Introducing showcase at that. Contrast this reception to ONR.’s shows in America, where Shields is largely unknown and without national backing. I have no doubt the Mondo Cozmo support appearances allowed him and his band the opportunity to win over audiences who might never have found his music in the first place, and these kinds of opportunities are priceless to artists debuting in new territories. The majority of acts from Britain have taken those tentative first steps in the Home of the Brave early on in their careers. Those coming to the headline shows are likely to be the true music discoverers, the open-minded people who click on the Related Artists tab in streaming services and are voracious to check out new artists who aren’t on everyone’s lips yet. These music fans are smaller in number but I’d argue they’re far more important in helping to break new artists than they are ever given credit for.

ONR. Washington June 2018 4

These were the fans who were treated to a full-scale, major club-like show in the 200-capacity DC9 Friday night. As mentioned earlier in this review, there are a precious few ONR. songs released, so I think everyone knew the set would be short. Shields and his band delivered an energetic performance, Shields as animated and bounding across the stage with gusto as he did in Brighton. Quick tempo tunes, including driving single ‘Love in Suburbia’ released on the day of the show (watch the promo video at the bottom of this post) and ‘American Gods’ released in February, gave the band quite a workout. A comparison of these to the slow burner 2017 single ‘Jericho’ highlighted the versatility and power of Shields’ voice.

They closed with ‘5 Years Time’, the combination of the vulnerability of the lyrics with the commanding instrumentation providing the ultimate showcase for the stadium-worthy bombast Shields has built into ONR.’s songs. I’m taking the strength of these early singles and this charismatic performance in DC as reliable indicators that ONR. will become a household name soon enough. Just you wait. Check out my interview with Robert Shields at The Great Escape 2018 through here. More photos from this gig are on my Flickr.

ONR Washington June 2018 1

 

Great Escape 2018: Day 3 Roundup (Part 2)

 
By on Friday, 8th June 2018 at 2:00 pm
 

I slipped out of the Prince Albert, allowed another one of Rebecca Taylor’s fans to scoot in where I’d been, and returned to the Hope and Ruin for music far meatier at the This Feeling showcase. I didn’t plan it like this, but they would be the second of three acts I’d see from Sheffield Saturday night. If you’ve done any reading on Sheffield at all, you’ll know its name comes from the River Sheaf that runs through the city. So I had a hunch even before I opened the biography on hard rockers SHEAFS where they were from. Delivered with a sneer, minor key anthem ‘This is Not a Protest’ is a foot-stomper, while ‘Mind Pollution’, encouraging not a revolt but a bigger revolution, is another laced with ‘tude. Forget the Sherlocks, SHEAFS have just pushed them out of the way.

SHEAFS Saturday the Great Escape 2018

I returned to the Old Ship for Charles Watson gigging at the Moshi Moshi Records evening showcase. Like Rebecca Taylor, he’s trying to carve an identity for himself that’s separate from the one he held in Slow Club. On his debut ‘Now That I’m a River’, Watson’s sound is decidedly more similar to that of his songwriting in his previous band, sounding at times like a throwback to ‘70s Americana, complete with the echoes. Imagine Burt Bacharach going folk, or the Eagles with less rock. It seems like a lot of artists are reaching backwards in time for inspiration. It begs the question, has the singer/songwriter genre gone has far forward as it possibly can and the only option left to keep things somewhat interesting is to go backward?

Charles Watson Saturday the Great Escape 2018

To get some air and to see some more music, I walked a short distance down Ship Street to the Walrus to check out a band far from home. ShadowParty are a group that formed in Boston and includes members of New Order and Devo. I’m embarrassed to say I had no clue who they were. Perhaps the knowledge of their existence spread quickly across New Order and Devo’s respective fandoms, filling this basement venue? I wasn’t terribly impressed by the part of their performance I caught (equipment overload for one, but that might not have been their fault but the festival’s for putting them in such a small place), but I’m guessing from the news posts from early May that they’re still in very early days of performing live together. Feel good first single ‘Celebrate’ was unveiled on the 1st of May, the first taster ahead of the release of their debut album on the 27th of May on Mute Records.

Shadowparty Saturday the Great Escape 2018

It was back to the Old Ship for the piece de resistance in my Great Escape 2018. Going through my reports from past editions of this festival, I had completely forgotten, or possibly blocked out my getting shut out of Teleman’s set at the Green Door Store 5 years ago. I know at the moment was I was mad as a wet hen and probably wanting to cry. They’re unequivocally one of my favourite bands of all time. As that old chestnut goes, “Patience, grasshopper.” The following year, I got to see them play songs from ‘Breakfast’ at two shows, one in New York Midtown and one in Brooklyn (RIP, Glasslands). Now, 4 years on from there, I’d get to see them at the Paginini Ballroom. The only way their performance could have been any better: if they’d been allowed to play both ‘Breakfast’ and ‘Brilliant Sanity’ in their entirety.

On this trip, I had to fill in some of my less knowledgeable British musician friends that three-fourths of Teleman used to be in another amazing band called Pete and the Pirates. That conversion took place quite a long time ago now, and with two whole albums under their belt, I kind of expected more of those songs to be in their set. Fair do’s that they’d want to put older material to bed and play the songs they’re currently most excited about, but also massively courageous to fill their performance with songs unlikely to be firm favourites except to maybe their most ardent social media followers.

Teleman Saturday the Great Escape 2018 1

Single ‘Cactus’, which will appear on their upcoming third studio album ‘Family of Aliens’, is plenty catchy, but I think it’ll take some growing on me before it joins the heady ranks of my favourites from ‘Breakfast’ and ‘Brilliant Sanity’. For those of us who have memorised the latter, we were rewarded with ‘Fall in Time’ and ‘Dusseldorf’, the latter capping off a plenty bouncy and enjoyable set building anticipation towards the new album’s release and their upcoming tour to take place in the autumn. I’ve been invited to a curry dinner and to jump on a boat with them (long story for another time); we’ll see if I make it back to dear old blighty for that then. Cross your fingers and toes for me.

TGTF’s Great Escape 2018 coverage, that’s a wrap!

 

Great Escape 2018: Day 3 Roundup (Part 1)

 
By on Thursday, 7th June 2018 at 2:00 pm
 

Before I’d even set foot in the country, I had already received loads of band recommendations from friends and industry folk alike on who to see at The Great Escape 2018. Many of them named artists I’d already seen, in Australia at BIGSOUND 2017, past SXSWs or elsewhere. I reminded them that the whole point of me coming out all the way from America was music discovery and finding new talent to spread the word on. My Saturday at The Great Escape 2018 ended up being a mix of new and old favourites, in some cases showing me that something familiar to me in a previous form could be made new, or at least different to what I had been accustomed to. In case you’ve forgotten already, the 19th of May 2018 was also the day of Prince Harry’s wedding to American actress Meghan Markle. Being in Brighton to focus on music discovery while all that faff was going on at Windsor Castle was actually a godsend. (And no, cousins, I didn’t buy you a commemorative plate when I was in London, stop asking.)

Like Friday, I began my day again on Saturday at the decent hour of noon. Having studied classical piano at a young age, I can appreciate the value of a classical music education. Michael Aston was formerly the keyboardist of C Duncan’s live band; the two of them had met when they were studying at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland in Glasgow. The Brighton-based Aston has his own solo project now, Knightstown, which Aston described to me is driven by his desire to create and to write songs.

Knightstown Saturday the Great Escape 2018 3

Live, Aston is joined by Matthew Hodson on beats and electronics, who looked awfully familiar to me. How’s this for spooky: 3 years ago when I was in Brighton last, I was sat in St. George’s Church for the Erased Tapes showcase and I struck up a geeky conversation about Rival Consoles with the bloke next to me. Yup, you guessed it, the guy was Hodson. Everything happens for a reason and when it’s supposed to. While the rest of the non-music-caring country were watching the wedding, Aston and Hodson were hard at work, opening the FatCat Records showcase at One Church. With Aston’s floaty falsetto and piano representing the old garde and synths and beats for the new, Knightstown is the beautiful symbiosis between the two. The music is equal parts reverential and inventive, exemplified by singles ‘First Cry’ and ‘Charlatan’. I’m looking forward to hearing a debut album in the future.

Of the many suggestions I received from BBC Scotland’s Vic Galloway that turned into a tip of my own, I still had Vistas left to see in Brighton. The big crowd at the Hope and Ruin was proof I wasn’t the only one eager to hear the group from Edinburgh play. The guys themselves were very excited, ready to launch their newest single ‘Tigerblood’ the following Friday. For some reason, I just couldn’t get into their music, their guitars sounding tinny and lacklustre. Maybe I was standing in the wrong place? I’ll give them another chance somewhere else in the future, hopefully in a place where I can actually breathe. I’d like to see if they sound better in Scotland…

Indoor Pets Saturday the Great Escape 2018 2

A last-minute addition to the Alternative Escape line-up were indie rockers Indoor Pets (formerly Get Inuit) at a teeny, boiling upstairs room. (Starting to notice a trend here?) They were special guests on the echochamp and DICE showcase at the Western pub. This was my first chance to see them after the announcement that they’d signed to Wichita Recordings. I haven’t gotten around to tagging all my old articles here on TGTF on them with their new name, so you’re going to have to bear with me a bit longer on that. With the triumphant confidence that comes with after signing with a label (maybe I just imagined that?), the band were in fine form, blasting out ‘Barbituates’ and ‘Pro Procrastinator’ with a fury I don’t think I’ve seen from them before. Is that the triumphant confidence that comes with after signing with a label, or did I just imagine that?

Indoor Pets Saturday the Great Escape 2018 3

I try to avoid the Prince Albert venue space like the plague because every time I’ve been there during The Great Escape, it’s been sardine city. The only real place I feel comfortable is by the entrance to the room, which turned out to be a good location. I’ve seen Slow Club a few times live and feeling like that act may have run its artistic course, I thought I’d see Rebecca Taylor as Self Esteem. Why not, right? Right before her set, she’s standing next to me by the door, moaning aloud that she’s worried about how she’s going to get back onstage. She’s a polite Northerner, after all. Bless. I told her to “get in there, honey” and push people out of the way if she has to if they don’t recognise her. Add “moral support to acts” under “guitar minder” in the festivals skills section of my CV.

Self Esteem Rebecca Taylor Saturday the Great Escape 2018

Taylor finally got back onstage with her female “staff”, all resplendent in their ‘squirt not pee’ red t-shirts. Her newer, electronically and rhythmically reliant music is so different than what I consider ‘classic’ Slow Club, it’s jarring. I guess it’s been too long since I’ve seen Slow Club, I totally forgot she was a drummer. Her debut single as Self Esteem, ‘Your Wife’, has been described as a I don’t enjoy the sound as much, but I will say that regardless of how you feel about Self Esteem’s songs, you can’t deny they provide a showcase for Rebecca Taylor’s voice, which has been and will always be beautiful. I might come around on her newest project yet.

 
 
 

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There Goes The Fear is where we tell you about the latest music, gigs, and tours we love and think you should too.

We love music that has its heart on its sleeve, tells a story, swims around our head all day or makes us dance like no-one's watching.

TGTF is edited by Mary Chang, who is based in Washington, DC. She is joined by writers in England, America and Ireland. It began as a UK music blog by Phil Singer in 2005.

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