Album Preview: Two Door Cinema Club – Tourist History

By on Thursday, 7th January 2010 at 2:00 pm
 

The holidays are always stressful and with these shorter days, my good cheer was in short supply. So a sampling of songs from Two Door Cinema Club‘s debut album, entitled ‘Tourist History,’ couldn’t have landed on my desk at a more appropriate time. It is scheduled to drop in the UK on 1 March 2010 on the French electro dance label Kitsuné Maison, who have also signed Delphic and La Roux.

By now I’m sure you’ve heard the Bangor trio’s first two singles, ‘Something Good Can Work’ (released in March 2009) and ‘I Can Talk’ (released in November 2009). Just on the basis of these two tunes, these Irish blokes definitely came well equipped to the party, with killer driving beats and an in-your-face immediacy. For better or for worse, there will be the inevitable comparison to New York City’s Vampire Weekend. (For example, one listen to ‘I Can Talk’ and you’re probably thinking of VW’s ‘A-Punk’ or the newer ‘Cousins’.) With VW’s second album ‘Contra’ out next Monday and TDCC’s not that far behind, I’m expecting a battle on the UK albums chart in early 2010. And if you laughed at the inanity of the video for ‘A-Punk’, I think the promo for ‘I Can Talk’ will make you chuckle as well.

‘Something Good Can Work’ is jaunty, ‘a spring in your step’ kind of number. And ‘I Can Talk’, with a relentless rhythm that is reined in by lead singer Alex Trimble‘s remarkably unemotional verses, is simply great stuff that would get me out on the dance floor. So the question is, can TDCC keep the pace with the rest of their album without sounding repetitive? From what I can tell from the five-song sampler we received, the answer is a resounding yes.

‘This is the Life’ is a bit slower with sing-song, slightly tedious lyrics and a whiny guitar, but it sports such a joyful guitar/beat outro not heard since the days of Republica’s ‘Ready to Go’, by the end it’s likely to have won you over. ‘Undercover Martyn’ begins softly and innocently, with the lyrics of “she spoke words that could melt in your hand / she spoke words of wisdom“. Things would have been just ducky for me had the song continued on this slower course; to be honest, it would have mixed things up a bit. But for those of you who got into TDCC because of the dance beats, not to worry: the song comes roaring back to life in fine style, speaking of spies and girls. Always good topics.

‘Come Back Home’ revisits a theme discussed in ‘Something Good Can Work’ that you probably missed because of the infectious dance beats – that massive worry of striking out on your own and wondering if you’ve got what it takes to make it in the big, bad world. In ‘Come Back Home’, the message is clear: if things aren’t going the way you planned, you can always return home and try something else. In TDCC’s case, I hope they don’t heed their own advice, because I think success is just around the corner for these guys. Stay in London and keep making music for us, please!

‘Tourist History’ by Two Door Cinema Club is scheduled to be released on 1 March 2010 on Kitsuné Maison. This information was current at the time of this posting.

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3 Responses

[…] by Kitsuné Maison on 22 February. The band’s debut album ‘Tourist History’, previewed last month on TGTF, will be released on 01 March. AKPC_IDS += "11086,"; […]

[…] debut album from those lovable lads from Northern Ireland, Two Door Cinema Club, is nigh. Having previewed five of the tracks earlier this year, I was eager to hear the rest of ‘Tourist History’. Considering that I liked what I had […]

[…] love with immediately was Two Door Cinema Club‘s debut ‘Tourist History’. I got a sampler of it electronically a couple weeks before the end of 2009. As a music journalist, I don’t think that aha feeling […]

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